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How RDF Databases Differ from Other NoSQL Solutions - The Datagraph Blog

How RDF Databases Differ from Other NoSQL Solutions - The Datagraph Blog
This started out as an answer at Semantic Overflow on how RDF database systems differ from other currently available NoSQL solutions. I've here expanded the answer somewhat and added some general-audience context. RDF database systems are the only standardized NoSQL solutions available at the moment, being built on a simple, uniform data model and a powerful, declarative query language. These systems offer data portability and toolchain interoperability among the dozens of competing implementations that are available at present, avoiding any need to bet the farm on a particular product or vendor. In case you're not familiar with the term, NoSQL ("Not only SQL") is a loosely-defined umbrella moniker for describing the new generation of non-relational database systems that have sprung up in the last several years. These systems tend to be inherently distributed, schema-less, and horizontally scalable. RDF database systems form the largest subset of this last NoSQL category.

http://blog.datagraph.org/2010/04/rdf-nosql-diff

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RDF Web Applications Working Group Current and Upcoming Events Teleconferences: The first Thursday of each month at 10am US Eastern time. An agenda is sent to rdfa-wg 24 hours in advance; minutes follow within a day or two. Will be monitoring comments on any specification or test cases W3C Standards and Notes HTML+RDFa 1.1 (REC) Semantic Web roadmap Up to Design Issues A road map for the future, an architectural plan untested by anything except thought experiments. This was written as part of a requested road map for future Web design, from a level of 20,000ft. Introduction to: RDF vs XML There has always been a misconception between the relationship of RDF and XML. The main difference: XML is a syntax while RDF is a data model. RDF has several syntaxes (Turtle, N3, etc) and XML is one of those (known as RDF/XML). Actually, RDF/XML is the only W3C standard syntax for RDF (Currently, there is Last Call on Turtle, a new W3C standard syntax for RDF). Therefore, comparing XML and RDF is like comparing apples with oranges.

Linked Data - Design Issues Up to Design Issues The Semantic Web isn't just about putting data on the web. It is about making links, so that a person or machine can explore the web of data. With linked data, when you have some of it, you can find other, related, data. Like the web of hypertext, the web of data is constructed with documents on the web. However, unlike the web of hypertext, where links are relationships anchors in hypertext documents written in HTML, for data they links between arbitrary things described by RDF,. RDF: The Basics A new article by Ric Roberts offers an introductory-level explanation of RDF for newcomers to the Semantic Technology space. Roberts begins, “Linked Data is based around describing real world things using RDF. A lot of articles about Linked Data assume you already know what RDF is all about: if you are coming to it for the first time, this article explains the basics. RDF stands for Resource Description Framework. It’s a W3C standard for modeling information.” He continues, “RDF allows you to define statements about things (or resources), in the form of subject-predicate-object expressions (known as RDF-triples due to the 3 constituent parts).

FAQ - schema.org What is the purpose of schema.org? Why are Google, Bing, Yandex and Yahoo! collaborating? Aren't you competitors? The Semantic Web - on the respective Roles of XML an BibTeX Bookmark OpenURL Abstract The next generation of the Web is often characterized as the "Semantic Web": information will no longer only be intended for human readers, but also for processing by machines, enabling intelligent information services, personalized Web-sites, and semantically empowered search-engines. The Semantic Web requires interoperability on the semantic level.

wiki.dbpedia.org : About DBpedia is a crowd-sourced community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia, and to link the different data sets on the Web to Wikipedia data. RDF triple stores — an overview There's a huge range of triple stores out there, and it's not trivial to find the one most suited for your exact needs. I reviewed all those I could find earlier this year for a project, and here is the result. I've evaluated the stores against the requirements that mattered for that particular project. I haven't summarized the scores, as everyone's weights for these requirements will be different. By a triple store I mean a tool that has some form of persistent storage of RDF data and lets you run SPARQL queries against that data.

RDF and Mind Maps Kerstin Forsberg has written an article about mind maps and how the concept of mapping the mind calls for RDF triples and formal models. She writes, “When I see these mind maps I see graphs just begging for RDF triples (subject, predicate, object)… An interesting exercise would be to have the Parkinson’s disease example completed in the concept mapping tool (CMAP) the whole way down to SDTM. And export the mind maps using as RDF triples.”

Linked data An introductory overview of Linked Open Data in the context of cultural institutions. In computing, linked data (often capitalized as Linked Data) describes a method of publishing structured data so that it can be interlinked and become more useful. It builds upon standard Web technologies such as HTTP, RDF and URIs, but rather than using them to serve web pages for human readers, it extends them to share information in a way that can be read automatically by computers. This enables data from different sources to be connected and queried.[1]

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