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Why Your Links Should Never Say “Click Here”

Why Your Links Should Never Say “Click Here”
by anthony on 06/20/12 at 10:39 pm Have you ever wanted your users to click your links, but didn’t know how to get them to act? When some designers run into this problem they’re tempted to use the words “click here” on their links. Before you give in to the temptation, you should know that using these words on a link can affect how users experience your interface. “Click” Puts Too Much Focus on Mouse Mechanics Using the word “click” on your links takes the user’s attention away from your interface and on to their mouse. “view” relates to the users task, while “click” puts the focus on mouse mechanics Instead of using the word “click”, look for a different verb you can use that relates to the user’s task. “Here” Conceals What Users are Clicking Some links don’t use the word “click”, but instead they use the word “here”. when your link doesn’t just say “here”, users can skip the verbose text and go right to the link when each link is labeled, they’re a lot easier for the user to distinguish

http://uxmovement.com/content/why-your-links-should-never-say-click-here/

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