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In Praise of Leisure - The Chronicle Review

In Praise of Leisure - The Chronicle Review
By Robert Skidelsky and Edward Skidelsky Imagine a world in which most people worked only 15 hours a week. They would be paid as much as, or even more than, they now are, because the fruits of their labor would be distributed more evenly across society. Leisure would occupy far more of their waking hours than work. It was exactly this prospect that John Maynard Keynes conjured up in a little essay published in 1930 called "Economic Possibilities for Our Grandchildren." Its thesis was simple. Given when it was written, it is not surprising that Keynes's futuristic essay was ignored. He asked something hardly discussed today: What is wealth for? We in the West are once more in the midst of a Great Contraction, the worst since the Great Depression. The first defect is moral. Second, the crisis has exposed capitalism's palpable economic problems. So let us imagine that everyone has enough to lead a good life. Let's begin by pondering the reasons for the failure of Keynes's prophecy.

http://chronicle.com/article/In-Praise-of-Leisure/132251/

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List of live action role-playing groups From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This is a list of live action role-playing game groups. This is for active or once active groups that run or organize games. It is not a list of game systems. A[edit] Refined dining Shaped in an age of scarcity, our appetite for sugar, fat and salt now torments us. But there is hope ©Magnum/ Martin Parr Martin Parr's 'GB. England. New British. Robots are taking your job and mine: deal with it Two striking articles on the roboticization of the workforce: first is Kevin Kelly in Wired, with "Better Than Human", an optimistic and practical-minded look at the way that robots change the jobs landscape, with some advice on how to survive the automation of your gig: Now let’s consider quadrant C, the new jobs created by automation—including the jobs that we did not know we wanted done. This is the greatest genius of the robot takeover: With the assistance of robots and computerized intelligence, we already can do things we never imagined doing 150 years ago. We can remove a tumor in our gut through our navel, make a talking-picture video of our wedding, drive a cart on Mars, print a pattern on fabric that a friend mailed to us through the air.

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Hudson: The Neo-Rentier Economy « Multiplier Effect Michael Hudson is giving a talk titled “The Road to Debt Deflation, Debt Peonage, and Neofeudalism” at the Levy Institute on Friday, February 10 at 2:00 p.m. Hudson is a research associate at the Levy Institute and a financial analyst and president of the Institute for the Study of Long Term Economic Trends. He is distinguished research professor of economics at the University of Missouri–Kansas City and an honorary professor of economics at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. The abstract for the presentation is below the fold. “What is called “capitalism” is best understood as a series of stages. Industrial Capitalism has given way to Finance Capitalism, which in turn has passed through Pension-Fund Capitalism since the 1950s, and a U.S.

Knutepunkt - Nordic Larp Wiki Knutepunkt is an annual conference on Nordic style larp which has been running since the first event in Norway in 1997. It cycles through each of the Nordic countries as hosts; in Sweden it's called Knutpunkt, in Denmark Knudepunkt and in Finland Solmukohta. In English the translation would be meeting point or nodal point. Though the conference started out strictly as an event for larp (Live action role-playing), and it's 3 founders Erlend Eidsem Hansen, Hanne Grasmo and Margrete Raaum all were larporganisers of 360 degrees Nordic Style larps, Knutepunkt has since embraced role-playing games in a more general fashion. Today the conference still has an emphasis on larp, but programs devoted to educational larping, freeform, blackbox larps, gametheory and traditional tabletop role-playing are common.

I have had enough of irony The ultimate faux-pas is not laughing at someone's artfully told joke. Especially when it's a huge in-joke, but stuff it! I did not find the Eurovision song contest in any way funny or joyful. Forgive me, for I have sinned against the law of irony. Instead of loving the whooping Twitter snark and the "witty" live blogging, I committed a veritable thought crime. Instead of thinking "This is so bad it's good", I thought, "This is so bad it's execrable": a futile exercise that people are trying desperately to make "fun". How Technology Is Destroying Jobs Given his calm and reasoned academic demeanor, it is easy to miss just how provocative Erik Brynjolfsson’s contention really is. ­Brynjolfsson, a professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and his collaborator and coauthor Andrew McAfee have been arguing for the last year and a half that impressive advances in computer technology—from improved industrial robotics to automated translation services—are largely behind the sluggish employment growth of the last 10 to 15 years. Even more ominous for workers, the MIT academics foresee dismal prospects for many types of jobs as these powerful new technologies are increasingly adopted not only in manufacturing, clerical, and retail work but in professions such as law, financial services, education, and medicine. That robots, automation, and software can replace people might seem obvious to anyone who’s worked in automotive manufacturing or as a travel agent. But Brynjolfsson and McAfee’s claim is more troubling and controversial.

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