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Suspension of disbelief

Suspension of disbelief
Suspension of disbelief or willing suspension of disbelief is a term coined in 1817 by the poet and aesthetic philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who suggested that if a writer could infuse a "human interest and a semblance of truth" into a fantastic tale, the reader would suspend judgement concerning the implausibility of the narrative. Suspension of disbelief often applies to fictional works of the action, comedy, fantasy, and horror genres. Cognitive estrangement in fiction involves using a person's ignorance or lack of knowledge to promote suspension of disbelief. The phrase "suspension of disbelief" came to be used more loosely in the later 20th century, often used to imply that the burden was on the reader, rather than the writer, to achieve it. This might be used to refer to the willingness of the audience to overlook the limitations of a medium, so that these do not interfere with the acceptance of those premises. Coleridge's original formulation[edit] Coleridge recalled: ”...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspension_of_disbelief

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Wise Attention Open Awareness By Jack Kornfield Meditation comes alive through a growing capacity to release our habitual entanglement in the stories and plans, conflicts and worries that make up the small sense of self, and to rest in awareness. In meditation we do this simply by acknowledging the moment-to-moment changing conditions—the pleasure and pain, the praise and blame, the litany of ideas and expectations that arise. Without identifying with them, we can rest in the awareness itself, beyond conditions, and experience what my teacher Ajahn Chah called jai pongsai, our natural lightness of heart. Once Upon a Time (game) Once Upon a Time is a card game produced by Atlas Games, originally released in 1994 with a second edition published in 1995[2] and the current third edition in 2012.[3] One object of Once Upon a Time is to tell a fairy tale as a group.[1][2][4] While the story is developed by the whole group, the competitive aspect of the game is that each player has an individual goal of using all of the "Storytelling" cards he or she has in hand, and finishing the story with their own special "Happy Ever After" card.[4][5][6] Only one player at a time is the current storyteller, giving him or her a chance to play their Storytelling cards, while the other players have a chance to "interrupt" the story and become the storyteller if, for example, the storyteller mentions something on one of the interrupting player's cards.[1][5][6] One player at a time is the storyteller. Expansions contain 55 additional cards. 2nd Edition expansions include:[8] 3rd Edition expansions include:[3] Other awards include:

Fix-up Fix-ups first became an accepted practice in the 1950s, when science fiction and fantasy were making the transition from being published mostly in pulp magazines, to being published mostly in book form. Many authors went through old stories, creating new manuscripts and selling them to book publishers. Mainstream fix-ups[edit] Science fiction and fantasy fix-ups[edit] An Antidote for Mindlessness In the mid-nineteen-seventies, the cognitive psychologist Ellen Langer noticed that elderly people who envisioned themselves as younger versions of themselves often began to feel, and even think, like they had actually become younger. Men with trouble walking quickly were playing touch football. Memories were improving and blood pressure was dropping. The mind, Langer realized, could have a strong effect on the body. That realization led her to study the Buddhist principle of mindfulness, or awareness, which she characterizes as “a heightened state of involvement and wakefulness.” But mindfulness is different from the hyperalert way you might feel after a great night’s sleep or a strong cup of coffee.

algorithms to solve rubik's cube algorithms to solve rubik's cube I typed this up to show as an example of an ALGORITHM. What is below is all based on Dan Brown's youtube videos. Chekhov's gun Chekhov's gun is a dramatic principle requiring that every element in a narrative be necessary and irreplaceable, and that everything else be removed.[1][2][3] Remove everything that has no relevance to the story. If you say in the first chapter that there is a rifle hanging on the wall, in the second or third chapter it absolutely must go off.

Whitehall Study The original Whitehall Study investigated social determinants of health, specifically the cardiovascular disease prevalence and mortality rates among British male civil servants between the ages of 20 and 64. The initial prospective cohort study, the Whitehall I Study, examined over 18,000 male civil servants, and was conducted over a period of ten years, beginning in 1967. A second cohort study, the Whitehall II Study, examined the health of 10,308 civil servants aged 35 to 55, of whom two thirds were men and one third women. The response rate for Whitehall II was 73% in total, 74% for men and 71% for women. A long-term follow-up of study subjects from the first two phases is ongoing. The Whitehall cohort studies found a strong association between grade levels of civil servant employment and mortality rates from a range of causes.

How to Setup Your Own Web Proxy Server For Free with Google App Engine 12 Nov 2013 Learn how you can easily create your own online proxy server for free using Google App Engine without requiring any hosting plan or even a domain name. couch mode print story

MacGuffin In fiction, a MacGuffin (sometimes McGuffin or maguffin) is a plot device in the form of some goal, desired object, or other motivator that the protagonist pursues, often with little or no narrative explanation. The specific nature of a MacGuffin is typically unimportant to the overall plot. The most common type of MacGuffin is an object, place or person; other types include money, victory, glory, survival, power, love, or other things unexplained. History and use[edit] Alfred Hitchcock[edit] Interviewed in 1966 by François Truffaut, Alfred Hitchcock illustrated the term "MacGuffin" with this story:[6][7]

Martin Seligman Martin E. P. "Marty" Seligman (born August 12, 1942) is an American psychologist, educator, and author of self-help books.

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