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Main Page - partsregistry.org

Main Page - partsregistry.org
The Registry's Repository The Registry's Repository contains DNA samples for thousands of parts, submitted by iGEM teams and labs. Last year, iGEM teams sent in samples for over 1500 parts. Be sure to add your parts and send samples to the Registry so that they can be made available to the community! The iGEM Registry is a growing collection of genetic parts that can be mixed and matched to build synthetic biology devices and systems. As part of the synthetic biology community's efforts to make biology easier to engineer, it provides a source of genetic parts to iGEM teams and academic labs.

http://partsregistry.org/Main_Page

Related:  Human Species Upgrade?

Carnival Booth: An Algorithm for Defeating the Computer-Assisted Passenger Screening System Carnival Booth: An Algorithm for Defeating the Computer-Assisted Passenger Screening System Samidh Chakrabarti Aaron Strauss 6.806: Law and Ethics on the Electronic Frontier Abstract Lasersaur Lasersaur The Lasersaur is an open source laser cutter. We designed it to fill the need of makers, artist and scientist who wanted a safe and highly-capable machine. Unlike others it comes fully loaded with knowledge to run, maintain, and modify. Since its conception, Nortd Labs and the Lasersaur community has generated knowledge to develop a comprehensive system. We have specifically focused on laser cutting, software, and making the building process repeatable.

Edge Master Class 2009 THE CURRENT CATALOG OF LIFE By Ed Regis In their futuristic workshops, the masters of the Synthetic Genomics, Craig Venter and George Church, play out their visions of bacteria reprogrammed to turn coal into methane gas and other microbes programmed to create jet fuel 14. August 2009 — John Brockman is a New York City literary agent with a twist: not only does he represent many of the world's top scientists and science writers, he's also founder and head of the Edge Foundation (www.edge.org), devoted to disseminating news of the latest advances in cutting-edge science and technology.

The Boston Shuffler The Carnivore, the Boston Shuffler, the Knife… are some of the names of the algorithms on Wall Street that make up 70% of the operating system of stocks formerly known as known as your pension fund, and portfolio. What Kevin Slavin is talking about is High Frequency Trading/Black Boxes that dominate The Street. Protei >> 2013/04/25, 08:00 : Barcelona, Spain>> 2013/04/18, 08:00 - April 21, 20:00 : Casablanca, Morroco>> 2012/04/06, 08:00 - April 10, 20:00 Tema (Accra), Ghana>> 2013/03/25, 08:00 - March 30, 20:00 : CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA>> 2013/03/08, 08:00 - March 18, 20:00 : Port Louis, Mauritanie>> 2013/03/06 08:00 - March 11, 20:00 : Cochin, India>> 2013/03/01, 20:00 - Feb 25, 08:00 : Rangoon, Burma>> 2013/02/20, 08:00 - Feb 21, 20:00 : Singapore>> 2013/02/12, 08:00 - February 18, 16:00 : Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam>> 2013/02/07, 08:00 - Feb 8, 20:00 : Hong Kong>> 2013/02/03 : 08:00 - Feb 4, 20:00 : Shanghai, China>> 2013/01/30, 08:00 - Jan 31, 20:00 : Kobe, Japan>> 2013/01/27, 08:00 - Jan 28, 23:00 : Yokohama, Japan >> 2013/01/15, 08:00 - 16, 20:00 : Hilo, Hawaii, USA>> 2013/01/9, 17:00 : departure from San Diego, CA, USA >> 2012/11/29 : TEDxVilaMada "Nosso Planeta Agua" Sao Paolo, Brasil >> 2012/10/18 - 28 : Protei at Lodz Design Festival, Poland. Blog Origin of the name & Biomimicry

WHAK! [KEVIN KELLY:] The main question that I'm asking myself is, what is the meaning of technology in our lives? What place does technology have in the universe? What place does it have in the human condition? And what place should it play in my own personal life? Genomics History[edit] Etymology[edit] While the word "genome" (from the German Genom, attributed to Hans Winkler) was in use in English as early as 1926,[6] the term "genomics" was coined by Dr. Tom Roderick, a geneticist at the Jackson Laboratory (Bar Harbor, Maine), over beer at a meeting held in Maryland on the mapping of the human genome in 1986.[7] Early sequencing efforts[edit]

Wiki edit is restricted to the sysop group (set from the "protect" tab)move is restricted to the sysop group (set from the "protect" tab)read is restricted to the sysop group (set from the "protect" tab) About | Development | Community | RepRap Machines | Resources RepRap is humanity's first general-purpose self-replicating manufacturing machine. Neither models nor miracles: a look at synthetic biology The 20th century broke open both the atom and the human genome. Physics deftly imposed mathematical order on the upwelling of particles. Now, in the 21st century, systems biology aims to fit equations to living matter, creating mathematical models that promise new insight into disease and cures. But, after a decade of effort and growth in computing power, models of cells and organs remain crude. Researchers are retreating from complexity towards simpler systems. And, perversely, ever-expanding data are making models more complicated instead of accurate.

Norman Borlaug Norman Ernest Borlaug (March 25, 1914 – September 12, 2009)[2] was an American biologist, humanitarian and Nobel laureate who has been called "the father of the Green Revolution",[3] "agriculture's greatest spokesperson"[4] and "The Man Who Saved A Billion Lives".[5][6] He is one of seven people to have won the Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal[7] and was also awarded the Padma Vibhushan, India's second highest civilian honor.[8] During the mid-20th century, Borlaug led the introduction of these high-yielding varieties combined with modern agricultural production techniques to Mexico, Pakistan, and India. As a result, Mexico became a net exporter of wheat by 1963. Later in his life, he helped apply these methods of increasing food production to Asia and Africa.[11] Early life, education and family[edit]

OpenCola (drink) OpenCola is a brand of open-source cola, where the instructions for making it are freely available and modifiable. Anybody can make the drink, and anyone can modify and improve on the recipe as long as they, too, license their recipe under the GNU General Public License. Since recipes are, by themselves, not copyrightable, the legal basis for this is untested.[1] The flavouring formula for OpenCola is:[2][3] Ingredients of OpenCola On Biotechnology Without Borders Can the reengineering of biology be coupled to the spread of tools and knowledge sufficient to improve the health of people and the environment worldwide? We believe the answer is yes, albeit with much work to be accomplished both technically and culturally. Practically, a comprehensive overhaul of the process by which living systems are engineered is needed. Legal, political, and cultural innovations are also required to collectively insure that the resulting knowledge and tools are freely availably to those who would use them constructively.

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