background preloader

Salsa Music Video Mix

Salsa Music Video Mix

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mv1ZsSrE03o

Related:  Assignment Ethnic Music North America

Chief Black Hawk and Bishop Kearns: Song For Teaching American History - Lyrics and Sound Clip This song is available on Kathleen Wiley's Westward Expansion Songs Chief Black Hawk was a red man .....and a good man. Bishop Kearns was a white man....and a good man.... They loved and trusted each other perfectly No one doubted their fidelity. Then came trouble brewing between their people....

History of Salsa While some respected cuban music historians have popularized the myth that salsa originated in Cuba the earliest evidence of it was in the Puerto Rico with Rafael Cortijo and Ismael Rivera. Salsa started having as background the rich heritage of the Plena, the Afrocaribean form of music that that evolved in Puerto Rico and the influence of more melodic rhythms brought in and developed by mainline Puerto Rican musicians that lived in the United States during the 20's, 30's and 40's and began returning to Puerto Rico after the second world war. These arrivals not only gave the newer Puerto Rican musicians a rich treasure of sounds from all over Latin America, including the Cuban Son and the Guaracha, but also placed on them the responsibility of being creative before those that knew the difference between talent and gimmickry. So the emerging Puerto Rican musician generation began to experiment in new combinations and ways to improve the established styles such as plena.

Mexican Mariachi Music and Mariachi Bands Mariachi: A Mariachi band is a Mexican musical group consisting of four or more musicians that wear charro suits. Mariachi is said to have originated in the state of Jalisco, in the city of Cocula, near Guadalajara, as well as surrounding states of western Mexico. Mariachi is now popular throughout Mexico and the Southwest United States, and is considered representative of Mexican music and culture. Mariachi was recognized by UNESCO as part of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2011. Origins of the Word Mariachi:

Top Salsa Artists : Salsa Music Lovers Marc Anthony If Ricky Martin is the Latin crossover star that wears tight leather and does Pepsi ads, Marc Anthony is the one wearing the black silk and smoking a cigarette. Anthony established himself in the ’90s as a contemporary Salsa superstar, and more recently, his English crossover recordings have expanded his overall audience. Universally respected for his clear and emotional singing style, he’s always brought integrity to his music whether singing a shamelessly revealing romantic ballad or cutting loose with some hot Salsa.

Cajun Music: Alive and Well in Louisiana By Ann Savoy One of French Louisiana's most vital attractions is its music. Acadian music has undergone vast changes since arriving in Louisiana, to a large extent because those who play it today live so differently from earlier residents. What Instruments Are Used in Salsa Music The instruments used in salsa music vary depending upon the specific genre and the geographic influence, but the basic salsa setup demands a brass section, piano and a rhythm section. From these elements musicians create a singular sound representing a fusion of African and Spanish traditions. The key to salsa instrumentation is the beat, so percussion instruments are diverse and often numerous.

Tejano music Tejano music or Tex-Mex music (Texan-Mexican music) is the name given to various forms of folk and popular music originating among the Mexican-American populations of Central and Southern Texas. With roots in the late 19th century, it became a music genre with a wider audience in the late 20th century thanks to artists such as Selena, often referred to as "The Queen of Tejano", Mazz, Elida Reyna, Los Palominos, Ramón Ayala, Elsa García, Laura Canales, La Mafia, Jay Perez, Emilio Navaira, Alicia Villarreal, Gary Hobbs, Shelly Lares, Stefani Montiel, David Lee Garza and Jennifer Peña, La Fiebre La Sombra. Origins[edit] Europeans from Germany (first during Spanish time and 1830s), Poland, and what is now the Czech Republic migrated to Texas and Mexico, bringing with them their style of music and dance. They brought with them the waltz, polkas and other popular forms of music and dance.

History of Salsa Name: Strictly Salsa E-mail: webmaster@strictlysalsa.com Date: 03 Jan 1999 Comments Salsa is not easily defined. Though many get caught up in the age old debate as to who "invented" salsa (Cubans or Puerto Ricans), the truth of the matter is that salsa has and will always continue to have a great number of influences that have each played a large part in its evolution. Music Genre: Salsa - Music of Puerto Rico Introduction The most widely heard and influential form of music from Puerto Rico today is called salsa. The term translates to English as "sauce" to denote music that spices and enlivens things. But not just any music. It is a complex musical genre that evolved from many roots into a uniquely Puerto Rican product. It could be said that "salsa" is primarily a commercial tag for contemporary Latin pop music that connotes a feeling that sums up the variety of redefined and reinterpreted styles at its roots. It encompasses a broad range of musical genres, instrumental combinations and cultural influences, ranging from Cuban son montuno, Puerto Rican bomba and plena, Dominican merengue, Cuban Yoruba ritual music and Afro-American jazz and rhythm and blues.

Salsa music Conga drums, one of the foundational instruments of salsa music. Salsa is primarily Cuban son, itself a fusion of Spanish canción and guitar and Afro-Cuban percussion, merged with North American music styles such as jazz. Salsa also occasionally incorporates elements of rock, R&B, and funk.[6] All of these non-Cuban elements are grafted onto the basic Cuban son montuno template when performed within the context of salsa.[7] Reggae Reggae is a music genre that originated in Jamaica in the late 1960s. While sometimes used in a broad sense to refer to most types of popular Jamaican dance music, the term reggae more properly denotes a particular music style that was strongly influenced by traditional mento and calypso music, as well as American jazz and rhythm and blues, especially the New Orleans R&B practiced by Fats Domino and Allen Toussaint, and evolved out of the earlier genres ska and rocksteady.[1] Stylistically, reggae incorporates some of the musical elements of rhythm and blues, jazz, mento (a celebratory, rural folk form that served its largely rural audience as dance music and an alternative to the hymns and adapted chanteys of local church singing),[2] calypso, African music, as well as other genres. One of the most easily recognizable elements is offbeat rhythms; staccato chords played by a guitar or piano (or both) on the offbeats of the measure.

Celia Cruz She spent much of her career working in the United States and several Latin American countries. Leila Cobo of Billboard Magazine once said "Cruz is indisputably the best known and most influential female figure in the history of Cuban music". Early life[edit] Úrsula Hilaria Celia de la Caridad Cruz Alfonso was born on October 21, 1925[2] in the diverse, working-class neighborhood of Santos Suárez in Havana, Cuba, the second of four children. Her father, Simon Cruz, was a railroad stoker and her mother, Catalina Alfonso was a homemaker who took care of an extended family of fourteen.[2][3]

Related: