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Ryan’s Bolognese Sauce

Ryan’s Bolognese Sauce
The thing about my recent houseguest Ryan is that he’s an exceptional cook. Bottom line: the guy just flat knows what he’s doing in the kitchen, wrestling pretty much any ingredient to the ground with complete confidence. If he wasn’t a minister, I’d say he missed his calling. But…yeah. The other thing about my recent houseguest Ryan is…he doesn’t so much use recipes. The night before Ryan and his family left Oklahoma (and guess what? For dinner Ryan prepared homemade pasta and his version of a Bolognese sauce. Please bear with me on the quantities of the ingredients Ryan used. He started by grating carrots. I started by having a glass of wine. Then he peeled and halved a red onion. Then he diced up a good amount. Then he sliced and diced a HUGE boatload of garlic. Lots of olive oil went into the Dutch oven. When it comes to adding olive oil to the pan, we don’t deal in tablespoons around here. When the oil was heated, Ryan threw in the grated carrots. Then came the red onions. Intellesting. Related:  Food PornFood & Drink

Zucchini Parmesan Crisps Recipe : Ellie Krieger Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.Slice the zucchini into 1/4-inch thick rounds. In a medium bowl, toss the zucchini with the oil. In a small bowl, combine the Parmesan, bread crumbs, salt, and a few turns of pepper. Flashback to the Seventies: Grasshopper Pie Perrys' Plate: SDT Week - Day 1: Creamy Chicken and Sun-Dried To (What’s SDT Week? Click here.) I’m starting out with a dish that you’d typically think of when you hear the word “pesto”. Throwing pesto (SDT, basil, or otherwise) over a batch of steaming hot pasta is an easy, quick dish you can do in a pinch. Add a few vegetables and some meat, if you like, and you’ve got a whole meal done in under 30 minutes! I must add, though, that sun-dried tomatoes and goat cheese are very good friends. Ingredients:8 ounces whole wheat fettucine (spaghetti or linguine would also work) 1 1/2 cups cooked shredded chicken 1 cup jarred marinated artichoke hearts, chopped 2 cups chopped fresh baby spinach (about 3 big handfuls) 1/3 cup Homemade Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto (or minced oil-pack sun-dried tomatoes) 1 green onion, sliced thinly 2 ounces goat cheese salt and pepper to tasteDirections:Bring a large pot of water to boil.

Sweet 'N Creamy Macaroni Salad No barbecue is complete without a nice chilled pasta salad. Today I’m going to share with you a twist on a classic macaroni salad. One that will be a SUPER-DUPER HIT at any pot luck, 4th of July celebration or a large family gathering!! Now, before any of you go off on me, about this salad not being healthy…I’m letting you know that it isn’t meant to be. It’s a feel good, comforting, holiday pasta salad that you’ll feel guilty for eating so much of, but you can’t help yourself cos it’s soooo good! This isn’t your grandma’s macaroni salad either, it’s a sweet n creamy dressing with hint of spice. Although I made a smaller batch of this salad for the recipe (half a pack of pasta), you can easily double it to make a whole (1lb) pack of pasta, for a larger gathering. Here’s how you can make this deliciously sweet and creamy macaroni salad… Method: - Start by boiling the macaroni in a large pot of salted water, until it’s cooked through.

13 ways to eat like a Peruvian | PERU DELIGHTS Hello everyone! It’s Friday the 13th. As a saying I like goes: “Bad luck? Good luck? Here’s the list: 1. 2. (dried and toasted Andean corn), tequeños, yuquitas (fried yuca) with Huancaina sauce, conchitas a la parmesana, or a combination of dishes shared by everyone in the table , if you eat out in Peru you better be hungry, because 3 courses are not enough for us. 3. 4. with your meals. in their bags when they move abroad. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Which brings us to the next 2 points… 11. 12. 13. Oh, we couldn’t help it. 14. Share this with your friends! Step 3: Fully Funded Emergency Fund | beingfrugal.net Don’t touch your emergency fund, unless you are truly having an emergency! The third step in Dave Ramsey’s plan for getting your financial life in shape is a fully funded emergency fund. The definition of a fully funded emergency fund is 3 to 6 months worth of expenses in an easily accessible account. Why Do You Need a Full Emergency Fund? Some people believe that having a small emergency fund of $1000 or so is enough, as long as they have assets like a 401k to tap into if they run into trouble. My family found out about the importance of a large emergency fund a few years back when my husband lost his job. When you have 3 to 6 months of expenses tucked away, you have the freedom to wait for a good job. You don’t want to be tapping into your 401k to pay for an unexpected surgery or hospital stay. What is a Fully Funded Emergency Fund? It’s not 3 to 6 months of your salary. Deciding whether to fund your emergency fund for three months, six months, or somewhere in between can get tricky.

Penne Bolognese I can’t even recollect how many versions of Bolognese sauce I have made thusfar. Well, my kids just love this classic Italian pasta sauce and so, here goes another one. :-) This Penne Bolognese recipe was adapted from Patsy’s Cookbook-Classic Italian Recipes. I think it’s among one of the best Italian cookbooks out there. It’s filled with simple and flavorful recipes which are accompanied with easy to follow instructions. Some of you may notice, I have tried and posted many of her recipes here. Recipe adapted from Patsy’s Cookbook-Classic Italian RecipesPenne Bolognese(Printable Recipe)Ingredients Method Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and sauté the onions for 4 minutes, or until lightly browned. Coarsely chop the tomatoes and add with their juice, the bay leaves, wine, beef broth, and oregano. Remove the bay leaves.

Sriracha Garlic Wings It's hard to get enough of chicken wings, especially in the summer, and especially when there's some major sporting event on. For as long as I can remember I've followed the Olympics religiously. Swimming, track, gymnastics, tennis, diving, you name it. I'll follow prelims as well as finals and ooh and aah over all the heartwarming background stories of athletes I had never heard of two weeks prior. (And being in Beijing for the 2008 games, in the center of all the action, was such a fun experience!) This time around I'm watching everything from my couch in Brooklyn. These Sriracha garlic wings can be made with common pantry ingredients. And I recommend having some good beer on hand to wash these wings down.

Gonna Want Seconds - Luscious Lemon Crinkle Cookies August 26, 2011 Print This Recipe Do you love lemon flavored bake goods? I soooo do. It seems to me that some people are either chocolate lovers or lemon lovers. I happen to LOVE BOTH. Ingredients: 1/2 Cup - Unsalted Butter, Softened1 Cup - Sugar1/2 Teaspoon - Vanilla Extract1 - Egg, Large1 Teaspoon - Lemon Zest1 Tablespoon - Lemon Juice, Fresh1/4 Teaspoon - Salt1/4 Teaspoon - Baking Powder1/8 Teaspoon - Baking Soda1 1/2 Cup - All Purpose Flour Instructions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Source: Lauren’s Latest

StumbleUpon Life! By Greg Henry You know I have been a fan of StumbleUpon for several months. But like so many of these social networking tools I have come to find that I was not really taking advantage of all it has to offer. I want to pass along a few things I have learned in order to encourage you to use and benefit from the community building aspects of StumbleUpon. In the food specific blogworld, sites like FoodGawker, Photograzing and TasteSpotting can indeed drive traffic to your blog. They are great at helping you build brand recognition, but their format actively discourages the reading of your material. Facebook is great for bragging rights and announcing new posts and reconnecting with your high-school BFF. Twitter is at least for “readers”. To me StumbleUpon is an amalgamation of all these social media outlets. So if you think the point of StumbleUpon is simply voting up your own posts, you’re quite mistaken. Every blogger (or avid blog reader) should have a StumbleUpon membership. “1. 2. 3.

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