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Australian gold rush timeline, HSIE, Discovering gold, Gold! Year 6, NSW

Australian gold rush timeline, HSIE, Discovering gold, Gold! Year 6, NSW
The first major mineral discovery - gold - was a watershed (a turning point or landmark) for Australian society. The initial stages of the gold rush were responsible for tremendous changes in the community, bringing Australia's first great waves of immigration from countries other than England and Ireland. Ambitious prospectors from Asia, Europe and America made the trek to the goldfields of Ballarat and Bendigo in Victoria, and Bathurst in New South Wales, in the hope of striking it rich. This influx of people brought many social changes, including an increase in racial tensions with the persecution of some groups, notably the Chinese. Government Surveyor James McBrien discovers traces of gold in the Fish River, east of Bathurst. Explorer and geologist Paul de Strzelecki discovers small amounts of gold in silicate near Hartley in the Blue Mountains. The 1840s Early gold discoveries were greeted with fear. William Campbell finds gold on his sheep run in Strathlodden, Victoria, in 1840. Related:  Goldrush Australia

1853 Gold Mining Licence | Australia's migration history timeline | NSW Migration Heritage Centre Era: 1840 - 1900Cultural background: Chinese, EnglishCollection: Powerhouse MuseumTheme:Gold Government Labour Movement Miners Riots Settlement Licence for gold mining, 1853. Courtesy of the Powerhouse Museum Collection Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, Australia. Object Name Gold Mining Licence. Object/Collection Description Licence for gold mining, framed, paper / wood / glass, issued to J McDonnell, printed by John Ferres, Government Printing Office, Victoria, Australia, 1853. In March 1851, Edward Hargraves wrote to the Sydney Morning Herald to announce that he had found payable gold just outside the New South Wales town of Bathurst. Lambing Flat miners’ camp, c.1860s Courtesy State Library of New South Wales With so many people leaving for the gold fields, many businesses found it hard to keep operating. Although there were some remarkable discoveries on the gold fields, few people made their fortune and most drifted back to towns and cities looking for work. Bibliography Websites

Discovery of Gold Discovery of Gold - A Brief History In 1837, under pressure of a bad drought, Thomas Learmonth and a group of squatters explored the area to the north of their settlement near Geelong in search of better watered regions. On this journey they reached and climbed Mt. Bonan Yowing (now Buninyong) and were thus the first to see the Ballarat area. In March 1838, two squatters, Yuille and Anderson, settled with their flocks on the banks of an area known as Black Swamp, now Lake Wendouree. During the next 13 years, shepherds and their flocks roamed in the area with Buninyong becoming the service township for the settlers. The discovery precipitated a great rush to the area which in turn resulted in the rapid growth of the new town of Ballarat. In that same year, 10,000,000 grams of gold were transported under police escort to the Melbourne Treasury. In the 1860's, when the shallow alluvial deposits began to run out, companies were formed to exploit the deep quartz lodes.

Stage 3 Gold Virtual Build July 3, 2012 by mrsbooth006 · 3 Comments · Education Stage 3 classes finished up with their HSIE Gold! unit last week. Many of the grade 5 students had been working on a virtual simulation of a gold rush town and the end result is wonderful. Mrs Booth filmed the build today but there were a few glitches with the program she was using! Also some of the students missed out exporting their builds onto the sim due to various reasons but the overall result and watching the students collaborate on the shared sim as they terraformed the land, selected Eucalyptus trees, various grasses and images was brilliant. Well done everyone. Stage 3 Gold Virtual Build on PhotoPeach My Place Website My Place: For Teachers Mrs Booth We love comments Tags: 5M·5N·Gold·HSIE·sim-on-a-stick·Virtual Worlds

The Australian Gold Rush www.patricktaylor.com | articles First published April 28th, 2006 The Australian Gold Rush - Diggers (State Library of NSW) Many people associate the Gold Rush with California or the Klondike, but the Australian gold rush remains the world's richest. The discovery of Australian gold Isolated gold finds had been reported in New South Wales since the 1820s, but it was another thirty years before a fully-fledged gold rush would take its hold on the British penal colonies in Australia. In February 1851 Hargraves took his pan and rocking-cradle and with his guide, John Lister, set out on horseback to Lewes Pond Creek, a tributary of the Macquarie River close to Bathurst. Word spread quickly and within a few days 100 diggers were frantically tunnelling for instant wealth. Edward Hargraves did not make a fortune from gold. The discovery in New South Wales and the resulting rush of labour from the adjoining state of Victoria prompted the Governor of Victoria, Charles J. The British perspective

Gold rush Sailing to California at the beginning of the Gold Rush A gold rush is a period of feverish migration of workers to an area that has had a dramatic discovery of gold deposits. Major gold rushes took place in the 19th century in Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, Canada, South Africa, and the United States, while smaller gold rushes took place elsewhere. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, there were several major gold rushes. Gold rushes were typically marked by a general buoyant feeling of a "free for all" in income mobility, in which any single individual might become abundantly wealthy almost instantly, as expressed in the California Dream. Gold rushes helped spur a huge immigration that often led to permanent settlement of new regions and define a significant part of the culture of the Australian and North American frontiers. Life cycle of a gold rush[edit] A man leans over a wooden sluice. A rush typically begins with the discovery of placer gold made by an individual. Australia[edit]

Australian gold rushes An Australian gold diggings circa 1855 After the California gold rush began in 1848, causing many people to leave Australia for California to look for gold there, the New South Wales government rethought its position, and sought approval from the Colonial Office in England to allow the exploitation of the mineral resources and also offered rewards for the finding of payable gold.[2] The first gold rush in Australia began in May 1851 after prospector Edward Hargraves claimed to have discovered payable gold near Bathurst, at a site he called Ophir.[3] Hargraves had been to the Californian goldfields and had learned new gold prospecting techniques such as panning and cradling. Hargraves was offered a reward by both the Colony of New South Wales and the Colony of Victoria. Before the end of the year, the gold rush had spread to many other parts of the state where gold had been found, not just to the west, but also to the south and north of Sydney.[4] Pre-rush gold finds[edit] F. At E.

~ GOLD ~ Early gold discoveries in Australia were kept quiet as many feared a gold rush would plunge the largely convict population into chaos and lawlessness. However the rush to California depleted the new colonys small population and forced the authorities to think differently about Australian gold. Self styled knight in shining armour Edward Hargraves rode to the colonys rescue. Early gold discoveriesGold was not always seen as a way of making a fortune. Edward HargravesWas Edward Hargraves really the first to discover gold in Australia? Gold in VictoriaMass migration to NSW forced the Victorian government to think differently. The frenzyAfter weeks at sea, Melbourne was a disappointment for most weary travellers. The journey to AustraliaTen weeks aboard a clipper ship was just the beginning of the journey for many Europeans flocking to the Victorian goldfields. Impressions of MelbourneAfter weeks at sea, Melbourne was a disappointment for most weary travellers.

Stage 3 Gold! June 23, 2012 by mrsbooth006 · No Comments · Education Coffs Harbour Public School Stage 3 students were transported back in time to the days of the gold rush on Wednesday. During term 2, they all have been working on a HSIE unit on the discovery of gold in Australia. Last Wednesday students were involved in a variety of activities including barn dancing, making a campsite (they had to have at least 3 items including a tent per group), stockade, BBQ, weighing gold, photos, alluvial gold hunt etc. It was a great day and the students enjoyed themselves immensely. Some lost large amounts of their gold and money due to bush ranger Jerry springing up from behind the bushes, but some crafty groups kept the bulk of their gold well hidden! Here is our Animoto slide show it lasts for around 7 minutes Happy prospecting Mrs Booth Tags: Gold·HSIE

The Australian gold rush JCF Johnson, A Game of Euchre, col. wood engraving, Australasian Sketcher Supplement [Melbourne], 25 December, 1876. Image courtesy of the : nla.pic-an8927787. The gold rushes of the nineteenth century and the lives of those who worked the goldfields - known as '' - are etched into our national . There is no doubt that the gold rushes had a huge effect on the Australian economy and our development as a nation. The camaraderie and '' that developed between diggers on the goldfields is still integral to how we - and others - perceive ourselves as Australians. Indeed, mateship and defiance of authority have been central to the way our history has been told. Even today, nothing evokes more widespread national pride than groups of irreverent Aussie 'blokes' beating the English at cricket, or any other sport for that matter! It is this early flowering of a national identity that makes any study of the gold rush days so intriguing. The discovery that changed a nation Gold frenzy Racism Vindication

Australian Gold Rush In fact they only got worse. A powerfully disruptive hysteria seemed to grip the State along with the rest of the country. Farmhands simply left their employers with harvests they could no longer reap and thousands of workers fled Melbourne leaving empty industries in their wake. Wages tripled due to scarce labour. To raise money, many property owners put their houses on the market. Luckily however, this was not to last. And of course, lucky miners returning from the gold fields spent extravagantly easing the pressure on the suffering Melbourne. The incredible wealth that poured out of Victoria was unthinkable. Robert Coupe says in his book Australia's Gold Rushes (New Holland, 2000) that: "When the first reports of gold in the colonies were published in English newspapers late in 1851, few took much notice. This wealth brought many imports and improvements to Australia. All this extra money moving around brought criminals too. The tiny settlement was now overflowing with prospectors.

Gold Rush in Australia! The transportation of convicts to Australia was phased out between 1840 and 1868. By 1860, the continent of Australia had been divided into FIVE separate colonies (not officially states yet, mate but seperation away from New South Wales), each not seeing eye-to-eye and exhibiting more loyalty to London to each other. A major force within the colonies was the “squatocracy” – the rich officers and settlers a.k.a. opportunists who had followed the explorers into fertile hinterlands. They simply laid claim to or “squatted” upon enormous tracts of land, often 20,000 acres and more. Free for all, mate with lots of social tension. Development of Australia was at a steady but unspectacular rate. Gold was originally discovered in Australia by Rev. [NEXT: the birth of a new nation!

Gold! Gold Rush in Australia Gold is found in rocks and in the ground. People came to look for gold in Australia. It was called the Gold Rush. It was a hard life digging for gold. Some people became rich but lots did not. Gold is a soft, yellow precious metal. Gold in California and Australia In 1851, during the time that there was a gold rush in California USA, a gold rush began in Australia. However, in Australia, it was not unusual for gold nuggets, some very large, to be found. The California Goldfields. The Largest Australian Nuggets In October 1872 Holtermann's Nugget was found. The Australian gold rush begins Small amounts of gold were found in New South Wales in the early days of the colony, but the authorities hushed it up. Within a week there were over 400 people digging there for gold, and by June there were 2000. Between 1851 and 1861, Australia produced one third of the world's gold. By the end of September 1851, there were about 10,000 people digging for gold near Ballarat.

Searching for Gold: A Collaborative Inquiry Project ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Student Objectives Session One Session Two Session Three Session Four and Additional Work Sessions as Needed Session Five Session Six Extensions Student Assessment/Reflections Students will select research topics based on interest. work in cooperative groups. research information in books and on the Internet. take notes on research topics. develop presentation materials using visual aids. deliver oral presentations to teach others about their topics. back to top Session One Session Two

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