background preloader

Australian gold rushes

Australian gold rushes
An Australian gold diggings circa 1855 After the California gold rush began in 1848, causing many people to leave Australia for California to look for gold there, the New South Wales government rethought its position, and sought approval from the Colonial Office in England to allow the exploitation of the mineral resources and also offered rewards for the finding of payable gold.[2] The first gold rush in Australia began in May 1851 after prospector Edward Hargraves claimed to have discovered payable gold near Bathurst, at a site he called Ophir.[3] Hargraves had been to the Californian goldfields and had learned new gold prospecting techniques such as panning and cradling. Hargraves was offered a reward by both the Colony of New South Wales and the Colony of Victoria. Before the end of the year, the gold rush had spread to many other parts of the state where gold had been found, not just to the west, but also to the south and north of Sydney.[4] Pre-rush gold finds[edit] F. At E. Related:  Goldrush Australiaaustralian bushrangers

Gold Rush in Australia! The transportation of convicts to Australia was phased out between 1840 and 1868. By 1860, the continent of Australia had been divided into FIVE separate colonies (not officially states yet, mate but seperation away from New South Wales), each not seeing eye-to-eye and exhibiting more loyalty to London to each other. A major force within the colonies was the “squatocracy” – the rich officers and settlers a.k.a. opportunists who had followed the explorers into fertile hinterlands. Gold was originally discovered in Australia by Rev. [NEXT: the birth of a new nation!

Australian Bushrangers - The Clarke Brothers | Australian Gold, History & Culture Info - Historic Gold Rush Village Mogo South Coast NSW Australia The murderous Clarke brothers were worse than any of the other Australian bushrangers, outdoing the notorious Ned Kelly, Ben Hall, Captain Lightning, Frank Gardiner and Thunderbolt. The Clarke and Connell gang became known as "The Bloodiest Bushrangers". Jack Clarke, an Irish shoemaker had been transported for seven years in the "Morley". He arrived in 1826 and is descirbed as being of medium build and 5ft 51/4 tall with grey eyes. They constantly raided crops and livestock, aided by their uncles Pat and Tom Connell. As bushrangers they plundered publicans, storekeepers, farmers and travellers. Till November 1866 the gang marauded virtually unchecked in a triangle through the Jingeras from Braidwood to Bega, and up the coast to Moruya and Nelligen. Most of the information on the Clarkes has been sourced thanks to Judith Lawson (nee Connell) and to her gift of O'Sullivan's book.

Victorian gold rush Nerrena Fossickers in Nerrena Creek outside Ballarat Overview[edit] The Victorian Gold Discovery Committee wrote in 1854: The discovery of the Victorian Goldfields has converted a remote dependency into a country of world wide fame; it has attracted a population, extraordinary in number, with unprecedented rapidity; it has enhanced the value of property to an enormous extent; it has made this the richest country in the world; and, in less than three years, it has done for this colony the work of an age, and made its impulses felt in the most distant regions of the earth.[3] For a number of years the gold output from Victoria was greater than in any other country in the world with the exception of the more extensive fields of California. Gold was first discovered in Australia on 15 February 1823, by assistant surveyor James McBrien, at Fish River, between Rydal and Bathurst (in New South Wales). Melbourne was a major boomtown during the gold rush. Background[edit] Gold discovered[edit] Dr.

Australian Gold Rush: 1850 The bonanza in California was only the beginning. An Australian named Edward Hammond Hargraves, who had been there, was certain that the same geological features were to be found in his own country. Returning on the boat from California late in 1850, he predicted that he would find gold within a week. The news of the fresh gold field reached England, along with the first gold, aboard the Thomas Arbuthnot. In fact, Hargraves had touched only the fringe of Australian gold. Other secondary rushes followed.

Bushranger History[edit] More than 2000 bushrangers are believed to have roamed the Australian countryside, beginning with the convict bolters and drawing to a close after Ned Kelly's last stand at Glenrowan.[3] 1850s: gold rush era[edit] The bushrangers' heyday was the Gold Rush years of the 1850s and 1860s as the discovery of gold gave bushrangers access to great wealth that was portable and easily converted to cash. Their task was assisted by the isolated location of the goldfields and a police force decimated by troopers abandoning their duties to join the gold rush.[3] George Melville was hanged in front of a large crowd for robbing the McIvor gold escort near Castlemaine in 1853.[3] 1860s to 1870s[edit] Bushranging numbers flourished in New South Wales with the rise of the colonial-born sons of poor, often ex-convict squatters who were drawn to a more glamorous life than mining or farming.[3] Much of the activity in this era was in the Lachlan Valley, around Forbes, Yass and Cowra.[3]

The Australian Gold Rush www.patricktaylor.com | articles First published April 28th, 2006 The Australian Gold Rush - Diggers (State Library of NSW) Many people associate the Gold Rush with California or the Klondike, but the Australian gold rush remains the world's richest. The discovery of Australian gold Isolated gold finds had been reported in New South Wales since the 1820s, but it was another thirty years before a fully-fledged gold rush would take its hold on the British penal colonies in Australia. In February 1851 Hargraves took his pan and rocking-cradle and with his guide, John Lister, set out on horseback to Lewes Pond Creek, a tributary of the Macquarie River close to Bathurst. Word spread quickly and within a few days 100 diggers were frantically tunnelling for instant wealth. Edward Hargraves did not make a fortune from gold. The discovery in New South Wales and the resulting rush of labour from the adjoining state of Victoria prompted the Governor of Victoria, Charles J. The British perspective

Sovereign Hill Education - Research Notes Welcome to Sovereign Hill Education Victoria’s 1850s goldrush heritage is alive, exciting and very hands-on at Sovereign Hill with creative, stimulating and interactive experiences for school students and kindergarten classes. Students experience Sovereign Hill indoors, outdoors, above-ground and below-ground, giving a tremendous variety for school excursions and ensuring an action-packed, fun day. Sovereign Hill Education Sovereign Hill Education provides programs that are developed and delivered by Sovereign Hill Education officers, who are all experienced teachers. Costumed Schools Program The Sovereign Hill Costumed School Program is a unique, two-day costumed role-play experience where children are fully immersed in the 1850s, learning about manners, costume, behaviour and re-living the discipline of school life on the goldfields. Narmbool Narmbool is a magnificent 2,000 hectare pastoral property at Elaine, approximately 30 minutes’ drive from Ballarat and 90 minutes from Melbourne.

Ned Kelly 1907_ABC1_Education_Schools_Opener_hi.flv ABC TV Education Watch our new on-air promotion Seeking Refuge This BAFTA Children's Award winner is a compelling and moving series of short animated documentaries portraying the real-life stories of young people who have sought asylum. Find out more Lockie Leonard Through the eyes of Lockie Leonard we view the truly mixed-up, yet very normal life of Lockie, his family and friends. Being Chinese Shot entirely on location in Beijing, this programme follows a group of Chinese children through their daily lives. The ABC has been providing an Education TV service for over forty years. ABC TV Education Programming is committed to providing content that not only meets the ABC's Editorial Standards and Code of Practice, but also the Australian National Curriculum. We broadcast on ABC1, Monday to Friday from 10am-11am, for 35 weeks of the year. ABC1 EducationDownload schedule flyers

Related: