background preloader

Primary sources for history & literature teachers

Primary sources for history & literature teachers
The National Humanities Center presents America in Class®: primary and secondary resources, online seminars, and lessons for history and literature teachers. America in Class® is designed to promote the analytical skills called for in the Common Core State Standards for English language arts and literacy in history and social studies: identifying and evaluating textual evidence,determining central ideas,understanding the meanings of words,comprehending the structure of a text,recognizing an author’s point of view, andinterpreting content presented in diverse media, including visual images. Online Seminars Live, interactive professional development seminars for history and literature teachers, conducted by leading scholars. Watch a brief introduction to America in Class® online seminars.

http://americainclass.org/

Related:  U.S. Historyżycie codzienne

Virtual Tour - Statue Of Liberty National Monument Want to know what's going on inside the Statue of Liberty's head? The eTour will take you around the island and up to the crown. NPS Photo Whether you want to relive a previous visit to the Statue of Liberty, or you've never been to the park and want to get an idea of what it's like, a virtual tour is the way to go. You control your experience within the virtual tour, choosing from 360-degree panoramas, videos, pictures, and sounds. You will need to have the latest version of plugin installed on your computer.

Literacy in Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects: Scaffolding Levels of Text Complexity (With Discipline-based Texts) Today’s standards in Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects require that students comprehend and analyze complex texts and write arguments or informational papers focused on discipline-specific texts. This one-hour on demand web seminar describes strategies piloted among teams of interdisciplinary teachers, grades 6-12, who implemented reading strategies for complex texts, including primary sources, and facilitated students in conducting research to answer a question, citing evidence to make their claims. Glimpse a few activities that motivated teachers to use geoscience texts that moved from simple graphics (such as a representation of fracking fluids) to a highly scientific article on methane contamination. Discuss the role of a content specialist (geoscientist) in providing context for the readings, understanding the organizational patterns of writing for science, and approaching writing inductively.

Learn: For Students: WWII History: Take a Closer Look at Primary Sources Exploring Primary Sources with the National WWII Museum There are a lot of ways to learn history: reading books about a certain time and place, watching videos about a past event, traveling to a different part of the world. When you visit a museum—or in this case a museum’s website—you come in contact with actual pieces of history. Those pieces of history are called Primary Sources. They come in the form of artifacts, archives, and oral histories. YouTube Social Studies Channels and Resources I did a bit of research to develop a concise list of You Tube channels and playlists for our Social Studies department. The feedback I got was these were very useful, so I thought I'd pass them on. Here's what I pulled together, with some brief notes... Crash Course World History & US HistoryFast paced Great opener or refresherHip Hughes HistoryGeared to HS AP studentsUpbeat & engaging fashion - great for new unitYale Courses YouTube playlistsMANY playlists on wide variety of topicsSmithsonian Natural History YouTube playlistsHistory Teachers YouTube videosHistory set to modern music!Example: Attila the Hun to the tune of “Here Comes the Rain Again”

Written in Bone - The Secret in the Cellar: A Written in Bone Forensic Mystery from Colonial America The Secret in the Cellar, is a Webcomic based on an authentic forensic case of a recently discovered 17th Century body. Using graphics, photos, and online activities, the Webcomic unravels a mystery of historical, and scientific importance. Online sleuths can analyze artifacts and examine the skeleton for the tell-tale forensic clues that bring the deceased to life and establish the cause of death.

Find Primary Sources from All Over the World on the World Digital Library As I do every year, I am taking this week to relax, recharge, and ski with friends. While I'm away I will be re-running the most popular posts of the year. This was the third most popular post in June, 2014. Last week in Iowa I shared some good resources for teaching with technology and primary sources. One of my favorite resources that I shared is the World Digital Library. The World Digital Library hosts more than 10,000 primary documents and images from collections around the world. History Globe In 1606, some 105 adventurers set off from England to try and establish the first permanent English colony in the New World. They settled in what is now the state of Virginia and called their colony first James Fort, and then James Towne, in honor of James I, the King of England. The early years of the colony were nearly a total disaster. Almost half of the settlers died due to poor choices in settlement location, management of resources, and quarrels with the indigenous Powhatan Indians. You are the Captain of the Jamestown Colony: Can you do any better than the real colonists?

Teaching World War II in a Split Classroom Many teachers divide their time between multiple classrooms, but how do they manage the challenge of teaching two grades or two subjects simultaneously? The web is loaded with content and activity resources that can be adapted to students of varying ages and learning needs. It's just a matter of finding the right ones. When dividing time between two grade levels, effective classroom management is essential. This World War II project, which encompasses both American and world history, allows a teacher to provide direct instruction to students in one grade level while students in another grade level work or collaborate independently. Begin by having students who will be working on the independent project read textbook content and reputable online resources, such as PBS' The Perilous Fight and History.com's Inside WWII sites, for background on the conflict's chief causes, key players and significant battles.

Primary Source Sets Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop critical thinking skills by exploring topics in history, literature, and culture through primary sources. Drawing online materials from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States, the sets use letters, photographs, posters, oral histories, video clips, sheet music, and more. Each set includes a topic overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

The Elizabeth Murray Project Mrs. James Smith (Elizabeth Murray), By John Singleton Copley, 1769. Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Copyright© 2002-2013 The Elizabeth Murray Project Site maintained at California State University, Long Beach Last Updated November 21, 2013 The War of 1812 For two and a half years, Americans fought Against the British, Canadian colonists, and native nations. In the years to come, the War of 1812 would be celebrated in some places and essentially forgotten in others. But it is a war worth remembering—a struggle that threatened the existence of Canada, then divided the United States so deeply that the nation almost broke apart. Some of its battles and heroes became legendary, yet its blunders and cowards were just as prominent. The film shows how the glories of war became enshrined in history – how failures are quickly forgotten – how inconvenient truths are ignored forever. With stunning re-enactments, evocative animation and the incisive commentary of key experts, The War of 1812 presents the conflict that forged the destiny of a continent.

The Real History That Inspired “Star Wars” - History in the Headlines Filmmaker George Lucas may have set “Star Wars” in a galaxy far, far away, but real-life characters and events from this planet’s history inspired his creation of the sci-fi saga. Explore how history—some of it a long time ago and some much more recent—has been a powerful force in shaping one of Hollywood’s top movie franchises. When George Lucas developed the storyline for “Star Wars” and crafted his heroes and villains, he tapped into elements of theology, mysticism and mythology as well as his knowledge of classic films. And befitting a story set a “long time ago,” real-life history also played a central role in shaping the filmmaker’s space opera. “I love history, so while the psychological basis of ‘Star Wars’ is mythological, the political and social bases are historical,” Lucas told the Boston Globe in a 2005 interview. Nazi Germany There’s nothing subtle about this historical allusion in “Star Wars.”

Related: