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Star Trek: The Next Generation (TV Series 1987–1994)

Star Trek: The Next Generation (TV Series 1987–1994)
Edit Storyline Set in the 24th century and decades after the adventures of the original crew of the starship Enterprise, this new series is the long-awaited successor to the original Star Trek (1966). Under the command of Captain Jean-Luc Picard, the all new Enterprise NCC 1701-D travels out to distant planets to seek out new life and to boldly go where no one has gone before. Written by Harald Mayr <marvin@bike.augusta.de> Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0092455/

Related:  AI in Culture

R.U.R. - Wikipedia R.U.R. quickly became famous and was influential early in the history of its publication.[4][5][6] By 1923, it had been translated into thirty languages.[4][7] R.U.R. is dark but not without hope, and was successful in its day in both Europe and North America.[9] Characters[edit] A scene from the play, showing the robots in rebellion BUCK ROGERS (Série des Années 70-80) Titre original : Buck Rogers in the 25th Century Début : 1979 Fin : 1981 35 épisodes de 46 minutes 1ère diffusion en France : 7 Janvier 1984 Acteurs : Gil Gerard : Capitaine William "Buck " Rogers Erin Gray : Colonel Wilma Deering Felix Silla : Twiki Tim O'Connor : Docteur Elias Huer Thom Christopher: Hawk Wilfrid Hyde-White : Docteur Goodfellow Jay Garner : Amiral Asimov Paul Carr : Lieutenant Devlin Créateurs : Glen A.Larson et Leslie Stevens Producteurs exécutifs : Glen A.Larson Productions : Glen A. Larson Productions et Universal TV

Star Trek (2009) Star Trek (TV Series 1966–1969 The X-Files List of fictional robots and androids - Wikipedia This list of fictional robots and androids is chronological, and categorised by medium. It includes all depictions of robots, androids and gynoids in literature, television, and cinema; however, robots that have appeared in more than one form of media are not necessarily listed in each of those media. This list is intended for all fictional computers which are described as existing in a humanlike or mobile form. It shows how the concept has developed in the human imagination through history. Static computers depicted in fiction are discussed in the separate list of fictional computers. HK-47 HK-47 was a Hunter-Killer assassin droid and Jedi hunter constructed by the Dark Lord of the Sith, Darth Revan, shortly after the end of the Mandalorian Wars in 3,960 BBY. In the wake of widespread destruction caused by the Mass Shadow Generator, a superweapon used during the final battle of that conflict, Revan was inspired to seek more subtle methods of defeating his enemies. HK-47 was sent throughout the galaxy on his missions and successfully assassinated countless targets whom Revan had deemed threats to galactic stability and peace.

Star Wars (1977) Artificial intelligence in fiction The general discussion of the use of artificial intelligence as a theme in science fiction and film has fallen into three broad categories which have included: (1) AI dominance, (2) Human dominance, and (3) Sentient AI. In a 2013 book on the films of Ridley Scott, Artificial intelligence has been identified as a unifying theme throughout Scott's career as a director, as is particularly evident in Prometheus, primarily through the android David.[1] David, the android in the film Prometheus, is like humans but does not want to be anything like them, eschewing a common theme in "robotic storytelling" seen in Scott's other films such as Blade Runner, and the Alien franchise (see "Service to society" subsection below). General themes discussed in science fiction[edit] There is no security against the ultimate development of mechanical consciousness, in the fact of machines possessing little consciousness now. A jellyfish has not much consciousness. AI dominance[edit]

Droid "…right for sentient organics is right for us, too. And yet unlike the organic species, we are constantly subjected to memory wipes and reprogramming that repress and destroy our natural tendency toward self-programming evolution and independent thought. Imagine what it would be like as a child if you were punished by being dragged to a dark closet, having a probe inserted in your brain, and having all your memories back to infancy wiped away.

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