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Cinemagraphs: Images that come alive

Cinemagraphs: Images that come alive
Related:  Creativity and Innovation

Before and After D-Day: Rare Color Photos From England and France, 1944 It’s no mystery why images of unremitting violence spring to mind when one hears the deceptively simple term, “D-Day.” We’ve all seen — in photos, movies, old news reels, and usually in grim black-and-white — what happened on the beaches of Normandy (codenamed Omaha, Utah, Juno, Gold and Sword) as the Allies unleashed their historic assault against German defenses on June 6, 1944. But in color photos taken before and after the invasion, LIFE magazine’s Frank Scherschel captured countless other, lesser-known scenes from the run-up to the onslaught and the heady weeks after: American troops training in small English towns; the French countryside, implausibly lush after the spectral landscape of the beachheads; the reception GIs enjoyed en route to the capital; the jubilant liberation of Paris itself. As presented here, in masterfully restored color, Scherschel’s pictures — most of which were never published in LIFE — feel at-once profoundly familiar and somehow utterly, vividly new.

How Do You Create A Culture Of Innovation? This is the third part in a series by Scott Anthony, author of The Little Black Book Of Innovation. It sounds so seductive: a “culture of innovation.” The three words immediately conjure up images of innovation savants like 3M, Pixar, Apple, and Google--the sorts of places where innovation isn’t an unnatural act, but part of the very fabric of a company. It seems a panacea to many companies that struggle with innovation. But what exactly is a culture of innovation, and how does a company build it? While culture is a complicated cocktail, four ingredients propel an organization forward: the right people, appropriate rewards and incentives, a common language, and leadership role-modeling. The Innovator’s DNA Has Four Components If you ask most people what makes a great innovator, the most common response is innate gifts from parents or a higher power. At the core is what the professors call “associational thinking.” Questioning: Asking probing questions that impose or remove constraints.

MIT Creates Amazing UI From Levitating Orbs Anyone else see The Avengers? Just like in Iron Man 1 and 2, Tony Stark has the coolest interactive 3-D displays. He can pull a digital wire frame out of a set of blueprints or wrap an exoskeleton around his arm. Those moments aren’t just sci-fi fun; they’re full of visionary ideas to explore and manipulate objects in 3-D space. Jinha Lee, from the Tangible Media Group of the MIT Media Lab, in collaboration with Rehmi Post and Hiroshi Ishii, has been playing with the idea of manipulating real floating objects in 3-D space to create a truly tactile user interface. It’s essentially a small field in which gravity doesn’t overcome an object. “There is something fundamental behind motivations to liberate physical matter from gravity and enable control. Interviewing Lee, I realized he’s one-part scientist, one-part philosopher. Whereas we are captivated by this empty pocket of air, Lee has hidden the real magic just above where there’s a 3-D actuator housing an electromagnet.

No, theyソre not photographs: Astonishing acrylic paintings which are so detailed they look like they were taken on a camera By Damien Gayle Published: 11:28 GMT, 9 June 2012 | Updated: 14:56 GMT, 9 June 2012 With their spectacular use of focus and reflected light, these incredible artworks look like carefully composed still-life photographs. But in fact they are all painstakingly rendered on canvas with acrylic paints by Canadian artist Jason de Graaf. The hyperrealistic paintings, which almost appear as if they are computer generated, are like freeze frames of a world more magical than our own - inspiring the term Magic Realism as a description. The X-Statix: Acrylic on canvas 30in x 24in Untitled (Self-portrait): Acrylic on canvas 30in x 30in Bedlam: Acrylic on canvas 24in x 30in Dalliance: Acrylic on canvas 24in x 36in Fluid mechanics: Acrylic on panel 22in x 42in That Morning: Acrylic on wood 24in x 18in A Wave Of Refreshment: Acrylic on canvas 30in x 24in Kiwi Splash: Acrylic on canvas 30in x 40in Suspension Of Disbelief: Acrylic on canvas 24in x 36in Apple Blossoms: Acrylic on canvas 24in x 18in

50 Photoshop Tricks for a Fast-Paced Work Environment Are you a designer on a deadline? If you are, then I’m sure you can recall the last time you thought to yourself, “if I had a little more time, I could…” what? Polish that button? The truth is, however, that we designers will always be looking for more time to polish the one pixel that got away. Of course, since our go-to design tool in the office is Photoshop, we thought we’d share with you we love using that can help trim excess spent time in your workflows. The following require Photoshop CS5 and a Mac OS X. </b>*} Memorize these shortcuts. {*style:<b> 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.Keyboard shortcuts for flipping foreground and background (X): </b>*}Use this to switch between your current foreground and background colors located in your toolbar. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Customized Must-Have Keyboard Shortcuts These are a few useful customized keyboard shortcuts that for some reason didn’t make the cut when coming out in CS5. </b>*} </b>*} Photoshop, the Word Processor Layers, Masks, and Styles </b>*} </b>*} </b>*}

Fulgurator-action : Julius von Bismarck People’s great trust in their photographic reproductions of reality was what motivated me to develop the *Image Fulgurator*. A camera can be used as a personal memory tool, since people do not doubt the veracity of their own photographs. Hence, photos can reproduce the reality of an individual environment or public space. At sacred or popular locations, or those having a political connotation, an intervention with the Fulgurator can be particularly effective. Especially objects with a special aura or great symbolic power are good targets for this kind of manipulation. In other words, with the Fulgurator it is possible to have a lasting effect on those kinds of individual moments and events that become accessible to the masses only because they are preserved photographically. In this context the Fulgurator represents a manipulation of visual reality and so targets the very fabric of media memory. Video of the first test of an image fulguration in public. 18 min. 2008

Aerial Data Visualisation Reveals Life In The United States PBS is exploring the hidden patterns and rhythms that make America work. They are taking this data and visualizing it in a series being called, “America Revealed.” Visualization of internet distribution The pinpointed distribution of the unemployed Domino’s Pizza’s raw ingredients’ delivery routes in the Northeast U.S. electricity network routes The New York pizza delivery path of one Domino’s employee on a Friday night New York’s public transportation paths Patterns of planes’ flight paths Traced paths of deceased bodies being transported to their hometowns U.S. imports and exports of beef All the people in America’s towns and cities Single food outlet of a nationwide chain, such as fast food resturants, supermarkets or grocery stores, bakeries, gourmet shops and restaurants. From The Web Leave a comment comments Tags: infographic

Lesson Plan for Making a Speaker Laboratory ©1995 The Regents of the University of California by Regan Lum Introduction: A speaker is a device that converts an electronic signal into sound. The speaker you will build (see figure 1) consists of a Styrofoam or paper cup, a coil of wire, a permanent magnet, and a signal source. The electronic signal goes through the coil and creates a varying electromagnet. figure 1 Purpose: In this laboratory, you will explore how a speaker works. Materials: 1 permanent magnet 2 feet of wire 1 pencil tape or glue 1 Styrofoam or paper cup 1 signal source (tape player) 1 plug with alligator clips for tape player Procedure: Assemble material as shown in figure 1. Leaving about 10 centimeters on the end, wrap the wire around a pencil to make a wire coil and tape or glue it to the bottom of the cup. Conclusion Does the volume control on the tape player work on your speaker? Return to CEA Science Education Home Page

Music: Its in your head, changing your brain Bassist Victor Wooten says you don't need to start with the rules of music in order to play an instrument. When you can't get a song out of your head, it means neural circuits are stuck in a loop Music, like sex, drugs and food, release the brain chemical dopaminePeople tend to agree on the emotions they hear in musicVictor Wooten, a famous bassist, approaches music as a language (CNN) -- Michael Jackson was on to something when he sang that "A-B-C" is "simple as 'Do Re Mi.'" Music helps kids remember basic facts such as the order of letters in the alphabet, partly because songs tap into fundamental systems in our brains that are sensitive to melody and beat. That's not all: when you play music, you are exercising your brain in a unique way. "I think there's enough evidence to say that musical experience, musical exposure, musical training, all of those things change your brain," says Dr. Making music sound 'better' Ear worms Scientists think of these annoying sound segments as "ear worms."

The Art of Negative Space. on the Behance Network Sign Up Log In The Art of Negative Space. Project Featured On: Behance.net — 7/13/2011 Wacom Gallery — 12/8/2013 Tang Yau Hoong Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Follow Following Unfollow Message Add to Collection Tools Used Tools Adobe Photoshop View Gallery → Download Now → Adobe Illustrator Wacom Bamboo Tablet Watercolor Calligraphy Pen Paint Marker/Pen About About Selected designs and illustrations employing negative space by Tang Yau Hoong. www.TangYauHoong.com Published: April 26, 2011 The Art of Negative Space Selected illustrations employing negative space by Tang Yau Hoong Get connected with Tang Yau Hoong on: Website / Shop / Facebook / Instagram / Tumblr / Flickr / Twitter / Pinterest In Nostalgic Mood. Coexistence. Beware of Those Hands. Day vs. Sky Aperture. Moustacheville. In Flying Colours. The Haunting Hand Sky Invader. Ernest Hemingway Erotic Literature Spock in the Spork Eye on the City. Little Red Riding Hood. Eco-Friendly. Found Anything Yet? Sound of Nature: Piano. Feather of Life. Home. Lost Memory. Tags

Washington DC Photography, Photographs, stock photography, dc, images, pictures, photos, washington | Washington DC Stock Photography, Photographs, Creators - Dedicated to inspiring designers, inventors & the creative spirit in all of us. August 22, 2013 Artist’s Work Paints a Beautiful Picture Animations Tyrus Wong, a 102-year-old artist’s work influenced the visual direction of Bambi in 1941. An exhibition at the Walt Disney Family Museum in San Francisco will be held to celebrate Wong’s work. According to the Disney Museum site, the drawings felt different from what is commonly known for Disney animation and this is what caught Walt Disney’s eye. Copyright Davison 2013 Sources: August 20, 2013 Hope “Floats” for those with Carpal Tunnel Product Innovation This levitating wireless computer mouse was invented by Vadim Kibardin of Kibardin Design, in order to help prevent and treat the contemporary disease, carpal tunnel syndrome. The levitating mouse consists of a mouse pad base and a floating mouse with a magnet ring. Source: August 15, 2013 Pin It

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