background preloader

The History Lab: US History Essential Questions

Related:  American History

How The USA Expanded (In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF) The 90-Second History Of Education 9.80K Views 0 Likes Well here's an insanely detailed infographic to peruse. It's the history of education and details the past, present, and future. Rewind Your VHS Tapes Or Face $1 Penalty 623 Views 0 Likes Was it really that long ago when you had to stand up and walk across the room to rewind our VHS tapes to re-watch a favorite scene or catch a softly spoken line that you missed? POP QUIZ: What Is History? 3.42K Views 0 Likes I love these thought-provoking questions. Cartoons for the Classroom :: AAEC - Association of American Editorial Cartoonists Tooning into history Resources to help you include political cartoons in the study of different eras Herblock's 20th Century: From the Crash to the Millennium Herbert L. Presidential elections, 1860-1912 : Cartoons from Harper's Weekly Lincoln vs. America in Caricature Highlights from the Lilly Library collection of political cartoons. Baldy Editorial Cartoons, 1946-1982, 1997: Civil Rights, Cold War, Vietnam Clifford H. Cartoons from the Clifford H. Civil War and Reconstruction Who was Thomas Nast? His cartoons popularized the elephant to symbolize the Republican Party and the donkey as the symbol for the Democratic Party. Click here to find out more about Thomas Nast, including a biography, timeline and portfolio of his most important cartoons. Political cartoons from the presidency of Franklin D. Waiting for the New Deal, Supreme Court Reform, War years 1942, 1943 . . . Harry S. Post World War II cartoon resources Oliphant's Anthem: Pat Oliphant at the Library of Congress

Bryan's "Cross of Gold" Speech: Mesmerizing the Masses The most famous speech in American political history was delivered by William Jennings Bryan on July 9, 1896, at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The issue was whether to endorse the free coinage of silver at a ratio of silver to gold of 16 to 1. (This inflationary measure would have increased the amount of money in circulation and aided cash-poor and debt-burdened farmers.) After speeches on the subject by several U.S. Listen to Audio: I would be presumptuous, indeed, to present myself against the distinguished gentlemen to whom you have listened if this were but a measuring of ability; but this is not a contest among persons. Never before in the history of this country has there been witnessed such a contest as that through which we have passed. But in this contest, brother has been arrayed against brother, and father against son. We do not come as individuals. We come to speak for this broader class of businessmen. It is for these that we speak. Mr. Why this change?

Digital History We are very sorry, but you have reached a page that has moved or no longer exists. Please visit our home page to experience our new look and updated navigation. On August 8, 2012, Digital History switched to a new interface. We have been restructuring the database and the organization of Digital History for the past three years, and we feel this makeover will significantly improve the usability of our materials. In our new interface, materials are organized by era, so users will easily be able to view many different types of resources for a particular era such as the textbook, images, primary sources, multimedia and teacher materials. Although the links to our textbook, primary sources, and other educational materials changed in the new interface, we believe the benefits significantly outweigh any inconvenience. Please email Sara McNeil at smcneil@uh.edu if you have any questions about Digital History.

Primary Source Documents For this entry, the previous subject matter was "Original Dictionaries of the 16th & 17th Centuries" and was linked to excellent work done at the University of Toronto. Time has marched on, links disappear. The works have matured and expanded. Our original list was--; Lion (Lyon) Gardiner's legacy--; Diary of Lion Gardiner (1635) The Gardiner Family of Long Island - genealogy (1635) GARDINER, Lion -- American engineer (1635) The Constitution of Plymouth Colony (1636) The Salem Covenant (1636) The Dedham Covenant (1636) Winthrop's Testimony (1636), the Boston Governor's account of his Christian experience. SNAPSHOT OF EARLIEST AMERICAN COURT RECORDS, including information about crimes and punishments--; The Pynchon Court Record , and earliest Springfield Court records, 11 Jan 1640/41 Massachusetts Body of Liberties (1641) Early written expression of the liberties asserted by the colonists in reaction to the oppressions of European governments. Areopagitica , John Milton (1644).

6 Important Wikipedia Tools for Teachers Wkipedia is a great educational resource for both teachers and students. Its articles appear almost always in the first four links of the search results. I know there are some issues with the use of this resource in education such as : plagiarism, trusted content and many more but still instead of excluding it all together we better learn and teach our students the best ways to use it. Everything online has both negative and positive effects and we should always focus on the filled side of the cup. 1- Wikisummarizer WikiSummarizer is an application designed by Context Discovery Inc. 2- The Full Wiki This is a mash-up between Google Maps and Wikipedia articles. 3- Navify This service is a mash-up of Wkipedia, Flickr, and YouTube. 4- Wiki Field Trip This service allows you to explore new places using Wikipedia entries. 5- Video Wikipedia This is an online project to add videos to Wikipedia articles. 6- Wikihood

History - Colonial Authority Black slaves were prohibited from carrying firearms by a 1639 Virginia law, which prescribed 20 lashes for violations of the statute. There was one exception: with his master’s permission, a slave could bear firearms to defend against Indian raids. Massachusetts became the first colony to legalize slavery in 1641. In 1650, Connecticut legalized slavery. The Barbados slave code was set up by the English in order to provide a legal base for slavery in the Caribbean island. Slavery was legally recognized in Virginia with the passage of a 1661 fugitive slave law. A 1662 law decreed that the children of slaves took on the status of their mother, in contrast to common law, which conferred the father’s status on a child. In 1664, slavery was legalized in New York and New Jersey. In 1667 Virginia even enacted a law that decreed that baptism would not change the status of the converted, meaning that becoming Christian would not free a slave. Pennsylvania banned the importation of slaves in 1712.

Beestar.org - Math and Reading for Kids 1740 | Slave Code of South Carolina Editorial Introduction: Viewed through the looking glass of contemporary law as reflected in free and democratic societies, the 1740 Slave Code of South Carolina is most certainly an abomination. It is a stain upon British and American legal history - South Carolina was a subject Province (aka colony) of "Her Majesty" in 1740. But then, few if any countries have perfect historical records regards to slavery. This law reflected the reality that pursuant to property law as then in vogue, negro slaves were the chattel of their owners to do with as they liked; really, except for speech, no different from a pig or a horse. To some extent, it was a reaction to a slave riot that had occurred in September 9, 1739 near the Stono River (see §56), especially as news had reached South Carolina slaves that the Spanish masters in present-day Florida was not only liberating slaves that could reach their but was also giving them land (see §47). South Carolina's Negro Act certainly went a step further.

Coming of the American Revolution: First Continental Congress News of the Coercive Acts arrives in the colonies in the spring of 1774. In response to the punitive measures outlined in the Boston Port Bill, Bostonians propose to cease all trade with Britain, as set forth in the Solemn League and Covenant. Haunted by the failure of earlier commercial resistance initiatives, the other twelve colonies (as well as most towns in Massachusetts) are wary of yielding to Boston's leadership. A colony-wide congress to discuss a united course of resistance emerges as a logical alternative. Massachusetts delegates John Adams, Samuel Adams, and Thomas Cushing begin their journey to Philadelphia on 10 August, surveying the political landscape and meeting fellow delegates along their route. On 6 September, delegates are informed that General Thomas Gage has seized provincial military supplies stored in Charlestown, Massachusetts, causing quite a stir among the colonists there. The Congress does not publish any of its proceedings until after it has adjourned.

Related: