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The Public Intellectual

The Public Intellectual
Within the last few decades, the emergence of public intellectuals as important cultural and social critics has raised fundamental questions not only about the social function of academics, but also about the connection between higher education and public life, between academic work and the major issues shaping the broader society. Truthout's Public Intellectual Project will provide progressive academics with an opportunity to address a number of important social issues in a language that is both rigorous and accessible. All too often, academics produce work that is either too abstract for a generally informed public, or they separate their scholarship from the myriad of issues and contemporary problems that shape everyday life in the United States and abroad. Articles by Henry A. Giroux Articles by (or About) Other Authors in the Public Intellectual Project Seth Adler Ian Angus Stanley Aronowitz Salvatore Babones Zygmunt Bauman Carol Becker Dr. Megan Boler Noam Chomsky David L. Simon Dawes Related:  Sociological TheoryBlogs & Podcast

Pambazuka News Trifunctional hypothesis This part of a 12th-century Swedish tapestry has been interpreted to show, from left to right, the one-eyed Odin, the hammer-wielding Thor and Freyr holding up wheat. Terje Leiren believes this grouping corresponds closely to the trifunctional division. The trifunctional hypothesis of prehistoric Proto-Indo-European society postulates a tripartite ideology ("idéologie tripartite") reflected in the existence of three classes or castes—priests, warriors, and commoners (farmers or tradesmen)—corresponding to the three functions of the sacral, the martial and the economic, respectively. This thesis is especially associated with the French mythographer Georges Dumézil[1] who proposed it in 1929 in the book Flamen-Brahman,[2] and later in Mitra-Varuna.[3] Three-way division[edit] According to Dumézil, Proto-Indo-European society comprised three main groups corresponding to three distinct functions: the function of sovereigntythe military functionthe function of productivity Reception[edit]

ISSC Welcome to The Hampton Institute: A Working-Class Think Tank Soc Rogue Scholars Occupy Boston Radio for the 99%! Listen Now! People’s Parade for Peace, Equality, Jobs, Environmental Stewardship, Social & Economic Justice Read more… Schedule/ProgramsMembersSubmissions GREEN ROOM (Our Blog) @OccupyBosRadio Facebook Wiki Chat Follow THIS LINK if the player is not working for you or you are listening from a smartphone. Please click on links to access program’s blogs, listen to past shows and learn more about OBR hosts. OBR produced programs are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. If you’re interested in helping out with production or having a show yourself, please contact us on our mailing list at radio@lists.occupyboston.org. Please join us for RadioWG weekly meetings: Monday 7-9pm @ E5 Sit-down with us and mix it up! Radio meetings and our studio are at: Encuentro 5/TecsChange 9B Hamilton Place, Ste 2A, Boston MA 02108 (map) Park St T Stop – Hamilton place is the alley with the Orpheum Theatre at the end of it – one block toward Govt.

Science overturns view of humans as naturally ‘nasty’ By Agence France-PresseMonday, February 20, 2012 20:50 EDT VANCOUVER, Canada — Biological research increasingly debunks the view of humanity as competitive, aggressive and brutish, a leading specialist in primate behavior told a major science conference. “Humans have a lot of pro-social tendencies,” Frans de Waal, a biologist at Emory University in Atlanta, told the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. New research on higher animals from primates and elephants to mice shows there is a biological basis for behavior such as cooperation, said de Waal, author of “The Age of Empathy: Nature’s Lessons for a Kinder Society.” Until just 12 years ago, the common view among scientists was that humans were “nasty” at the core but had developed a veneer of morality — albeit a thin one, de Waal told scientists and journalists from some 50 countries. “Human morality is unthinkable without empathy.” Copyright 2012 The Raw Story Agence France-Presse

Craig McKie Sociological Writing What this handout is about This handout introduces you to the wonderful world of writing sociology. Before you can write a clear and coherent sociology paper, you need a firm understanding of the assumptions and expectations of the discipline. You need to know your audience, the way they view the world and how they order and evaluate information. What is sociology, and what do sociologists write about? Unlike many of the other subjects here at UNC, such as history or English, sociology is a new subject for many students. So, just what is a sociological perspective? Key assumptions and characteristics of sociological writing What are the most important things to keep in mind as you write in sociology? Argument The first thing to remember in writing a sociological argument is to be as clear as possible in stating your thesis. Although each of these three arguments seems quite different, they all share one common feature: they assume exactly what they need to be explaining. Evidence

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