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Geospatial Revolution Project

Geospatial Revolution Project
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List of terrestrial ecoregions (WWF) This is a list of terrestrial ecoregions as compiled by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). The WWF identifies terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecoregions. The terrestrial scheme divides the Earth's land surface into 8 terrestrial ecozones, containing 867 smaller ecoregions. Additional ecoregions for Antarctic Realm are currently being incorporated (based on Terauds et al. 2012). Terauds, A, SL Chown, F Morgan, HJ Peat, DJ Watts, H Keys, P Convey, DM Bergstrom. 2012. Ricketts, Taylor H., Eric Dinerstein, David M.

Classics - John Snow: The London Cholera Epidemic of 1854 It wasn't until 1854 that Cholera struck England once again, that Snow was able to legitimate his argument that Cholera was spread through contaminated food or water. Snow, in investigating the epidemic, began plotting the location of deaths related to Cholera (see illustration). At the time, London was supplied its water by two water companies. One of these companies pulled its water out of the Thames River upstream of the main city while the second pulled its water from the river downstream from the city. A higher concentration of Cholera was found in the region of town supplied by the water company that drew its water form the downstream location. Water from this source could have been contaminated by the city's sewage. After the panic-stricken officials followed Snow's advice to remove the handle of the Broad Street Pump that supplied the water to this neighborhood, the epidemic was contained.

Chapter 1: Data and Information | The Nature of Geographic Information course home page Navigation Start Here Orientation Resources Course Text Recent comments more Search Chapter 1: Data and Information Printer-friendly version ‹ GEOG 482 up 1. Author: David DiBiase, Senior Lecturer, John A. Penn State Professional Masters Degree in GIS: Winner of the 2009 Sloan Consortium award for Most Outstanding Online Program © 2014 The Pennsylvania State University This courseware module is part of Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences' OER Initiative. The College of Earth and Mineral Sciences is committed to making its websites accessible to all users, and welcomes comments or suggestions on access improvements. Locative media Locative media or Location-based media are media of communication functionally bound to a location. The physical implementation of locative media, however, is not bound to the same location to which the content refers. Location-based media (LBM) delivers multimedia and other content directly to the user of a mobile device dependent upon their location. Location information determined by means such as mobile phone tracking and other emerging Real-time locating system technologies like Wi-Fi or RFID can be used to customize media content presented on the device. The term was jointly coined at the 2004 Consumer Electronics Show by Tom Brammar, the then Chief Executive of Node, and Martin Hill, founder of the Product Management function and practices at Symbian, and wireless pioneer. Locative media are digital media applied to real places and thus triggering real social interactions. Description[edit] Locative, ubiquitous and pervasive computing[edit] Enabling technologies[edit] Examples[edit]

Spatial History Project The Spatial History Project at Stanford University, a part of the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis (CESTA), is made possible by the generous funding of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (VPUE), DoResearch, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and The Wallenberg Foundation Media Places Initiative. The Spatial History Project at Stanford University is a place for a collaborative community of students, staff, and scholars to engage in creative spatial, textual and visual analysis to further research in the humanities. We are part of the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis (CESTA) along with Humanities+Design and the Literary Lab on the top floor of Wallenberg Hall. We continually seek fruitful collaborations with faculty at Stanford and beyond, and hire motivated students year round. If you are interested in learning more, please contact Matt Bryant.

Big ideas from small places Editor's Note: Parag Khanna is a senior research fellow at the New America Foundation, visiting senior fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, and author of The Second World and How to Run the World. David Skilling is founding director at Landfall Strategy Group, a Singapore-based advisory firm. By Parag Khanna and David Skilling – Special to CNN In the current phase of globalization, financial, ecological, political and social crises are occurring simultaneously and magnifying each other in unpredictable ways. Large countries and blocs such as the U.S., China and the EU, and new groupings like the G-20 and the BRICS, are grappling with this unprecedented combination of structural challenges and black swans. Perhaps we need to look elsewhere for the next generation of policy innovations. Because small countries are much more exposed and vulnerable to global developments, they have an acute understanding of globalization’s turbulent dynamics.

Right MAP Making GIS Commons: A Free eText about Geographic Information Systems

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