background preloader

Classroom Solutions, Top Teaching Ideas in Teacher Blogs

Classroom Solutions, Top Teaching Ideas in Teacher Blogs

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/teaching-ideas

Related:  ms_jor90portal šl

Press Space or double-click to edit Capture ideas at the spead of thought – using a mind map maker designed to help you focus on your ideas and remove all the distractions while mindmapping. Create unlimited mind maps for free, and store them in the cloud. Your mind maps are available everywhere, instantly, from any device. 50 Must-See Teacher Blogs Chosen By You This is part of a series of ‘Best of 2011‘ posts where we share some of the best education-related materials of the past year. Be sure to check back on a regular basis as we’ve got some pretty exciting stuff coming soon! During a recent chat with fellow Edudemic writer Terry Heick, we discussed the purpose of blogs. In a world of social media and connectivity, what role does a blog play for teachers?

Jeff's Edublog Naked Eye Observation Telescopic Observation Spacecraft flyby mission Orbiter observations Planetary Lander Detailed view of landscape Finding Life continue reading This post contains information and resources presented by Jeff Stanger at the 15th Biennial Science Teachers Workshop, The University of Sydney, November 5th, 2012. Wikis, Google or Office Docs as collaborative workspaces A summary of my use of wikis or shared documents as collaborative workspaces is contained within this article A video illustrating the use [...] continue reading

Using Digital Tools for Differentiation Direct Address to this Page: Anyone who has worked in education for any length of time knows just how important it is for teachers to create differentiated classrooms. If schools are truly working to ensure success for every student, learning experiences need to be customized and aligned to student interests, needs, and unique learning styles. The challenge, however, rests in making differentiation manageable. While few teachers doubt the importance of differentiating, many struggle to make customized learning spaces a reality. In this February 2012 Alaska Staff Development Network webinar, sixth grade classroom teacher, blogger and educational technology author Bill Ferriter will introduce participants to a range of digital tools that can be used to (1). provide structure for differentiated classrooms and (2). differentiate learning experiences by student interest.

Teach 4 the Heart Teaching Resources I am the founder of Teach 4 the Heart (www.teach4theheart.com) I've also taught middle school math for four years, including Math 6, pre algebra, and Algebra 1. I've also taught English and accounting. I lean towards a more traditional teaching style, but I am always looking for new ideas. I believe technology should aid in genuine learning, not just be used for its own sake.

The Starr Spangled Planner: 10 Ways to Support Students with Hyperactivity & Attention Needs I know I am not alone when I say that I struggle to sit through staff meetings without doodling on my paper, shifting in my seat, getting up to use the bathroom and occasionally whispering with my teacher friend next to me. Now, these are every other week, and only for an hour. Every time I leave, I think, "How are kids expected to do it all day?!?" Logic and inference through song Spurred by my recent foray into ideas for increasing critical thinking, here’s an idea that I think combines a lot of different ideas, including critical thinking and logical inference, into a skill-building activity that engages a virtually universal student interest: music. The text I will use for the activity I have in mind is Jonathan Coulton’s fabulously bittersweet song Blue Sunny Day. I suspect that this activity could be repeated with other songs, but I chose this song for several reasons. The first is that the song itself is musically upbeat – peppy and in a major setting* – and that will help engage students from the get-go. The second is that the tone of the music does not actually match the tone of the lyrics, which are slightly ironic but in the end a little depressing.

ict4meandyou.wikispaces You are not a member of this wiki. Join now Dismiss guest | Join | Help | Sign In HOME Photos & Videos Sessions PhotoShop iPod & iPads Webtools Captivate SRN Adobe Presenter Photos & Videos math resources Thanks to Laura at Will Grade for Coffee for introducing me to Scholastic Teacher Express. I have never heard of scholastic teacher express until I read her blog this morning. Laura has some great ideas for the classroom and her blog posts are enjoyable to read.

SMART Exchange - USA - Search lessons by keyword Jeopardy [SMART Notebook lesson] A jeopardy game template to be used for a chapter review, or end of year testing review. It takes a while to g... One Sharp Bunch: Guided Reading Organization Hi there, friends! I'm here today with a peek into my guided reading block. I'll be sharing how I organize my guided reading materials, schedule out my guided reading groups, as well as how I plan my guided reading lessons! Psst.... Repetition Doesn’t Work: Better Ways to Train Your Memory How the massive influx of tourists impacted prostitution, which is technically legal, in the South American country. In 1920, to prepare for King Albert of Belgium’s visit to Rio de Janeiro, local officials engaged in an extralegal campaign to improve the city’s “moral hygiene.” Police rounded up all the lower-class prostitutes, cuffed them, and relocated them to the “Mangue”—or downtown marsh district, thereby forming Rio’s very first red light district. Further cleansing occurred in 1967, when police erected walls around the prostitution zone to shield it from the delicate gaze of Queen Elizabeth II in advance of her state visit the following year. The police crackdown on crime also extended to prostitution in order to, as the district attorney stated, “contribute to changing [Rio’s] soiled image.” Thousands of sex websites were reportedly targeted, and Brazil’s leftist president, Dilma Rousseff, took to Twitter to denounce “sexual tourism” during the World Cup.

OneNote – A Practical Tip « First Steps We started using OneNote with our Year 9 English classes in 2009 and continued with the process as they moved into Year 10 in 2010. Our Year 9 students that have just received their laptops have now also begun the process of using OneNote as their English book. (Please see my previous post for how we set up the OneNote notebooks as templates for the entire cohorts.) This has been going swimmingly, and apart from spelling tests and in-class writing tasks, we have rarely used their exercise book since. This led us to a unique challenge though. We collect student books once per term to check on their work, mark work and give feedback as to progress, etc.

Related:  Scholastsic.com