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Egyptian Deities and Myths Compared to the Bible

Egyptian Deities and Myths Compared to the Bible
There are few books that have caused as much controversy as the Holy Bible. For centuries now, it has been regarded by many to be the "one true word of God". The writers of the Bible may have been human beings... but it is said that those writers had "divine inspiration" for their words. However, religions and worship of deities existed before the writings of the Bible. Horus One important note about the gods and goddesses of ancient Egypt... they were not one-dimensional beings. Hathor There are differing accounts of this... some of which have Isis as the wife of Horus, rather than his mother, which is a bit confusing. Horus is also the only son of the Osiris, the god of fertility and vegetation. Nepthys The Egyptian Creation Story In the Egyptian creation story, the four children of Geb (god of the sky) and Nut (goddess of the earth) sired four children. Whether or not she found them all is unknown... however, according to legend, she was able to conceive a child, Horus, with him. Related:  EgyptMythology

Mésopotamie Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Carte de la Mésopotamie avec les frontières des États modernes, l'ancien tracé du littoral du golfe Persique et les sites des grandes cités antiques. Elle comprend deux régions topographiques distinctes et remarquables: d'une part au nord (nord-est de la Syrie et le nord de l'Irak actuel) une région de plateaux, celle-ci étant une zone de cultures pluviales; et d'autre par au sud, une région de plaines où l'on pratique une agriculture reposant exclusivement sur l'irrigation. L'ensemble des historiens et des archéologues contemporains s'accorderaient à dire que les Mésopotamiens sont à l'origine de l'écriture. Actuellement, le terme « Mésopotamie » est généralement utilisé en référence à l'histoire antique de cette région, pour la civilisation ayant occupé cet espace jusqu'aux derniers siècles avant l'ère chrétienne ou au VIIe siècle, plus exactement en 637 ap. Géographie[modifier | modifier le code] Chronologie[modifier | modifier le code]

The Kerala Articles: Comparison of Hindu and Greek Mythologies Of Gods and Men Greek Gods Image Courtesy : umich.edu Mythology is the oral retelling of stories or myths of a particular group of people or culture that lived long ago. They provide us an idea about the values, culture and intellectual development of the people of those cultures and civilizations. Two of the most vibrant, advanced and complex mythologies are that of the ancient Greeks and the Hindus (Indian). Zeus and Indra In Hindu mythology the Kashyapa fathered the Devas (Gods). Indra Image Courtesy : jnanam.net In Greek mythology the Gods were fathered by Cronus. Good and Evil The Gods of Mount Olympus represents good while their antitheses are the Titans represent evil. Devas battling the Asuras Image Courtesy : harekrsna.com Gods, Men and Evil While men have always worshipped and showed unfaltering devotion towards the Gods, the Gods on their part have not been as benevolent as they might lead us to believe. Prometheus giving fire to man Image Courtesy : wikipedia.org

Osiris myth From right to left: Isis, her husband Osiris, and their son Horus, the protagonists of the Osiris myth, in a Twenty-second Dynasty statuette The Osiris myth reached its basic form in or before the 24th century BCE. Many of its elements originated in religious ideas, but the conflict between Horus and Set may have been partly inspired by a regional struggle in Egypt's early history or prehistory. Scholars have tried to discern the exact nature of the events that gave rise to the story, but they have reached no definitive conclusions. Parts of the myth appear in a wide variety of Egyptian texts, from funerary texts and magical spells to short stories. Sources[edit] The same elements from the myth that appear in the Pyramid Texts recur in funerary texts written in later times, such as the Coffin Texts from the Middle Kingdom (c. 2055–1650 BCE) and the Book of the Dead from the New Kingdom (c. 1550–1070 BCE). Rituals in honor of Osiris are another major source of information. Synopsis[edit]

The Annunaki and the Myth of a 12th Planet By Neil Freer | ufo.whipnet.org Received from Light Eye Sumerian Culture and the Annunaki Working from the same archaeological discoveries, artifacts, and recovered records as archaeologists and linguists have for two hundred years, Sitchin propounds – proves, in the opinion of this author -- that the Anunnaki (Sumerian: “those who came down from the heavens”; Old testament Hebrew, Anakeim, Nefilim, Elohim; Egyptian: Neter), an advanced civilization from the tenth planet in our solar system, splashed down in the Persian gulf area around 432,000 years ago, colonized the planet, with the purpose of obtaining large quantities of gold. Some 250,000 years ago, the recovered documents tell us, their lower echelon miners rebelled against the conditions in the mines and the Anunnaki directorate decided to create a creature to take their place. Eventually, we became so numerous that some of us were expelled from the Anunnaki city centers, gradually spreading over the planet. By Michael S.

Isis (God of nature and magic,Ideal mother and wife as well as the patroness of ) Temple of Isis in Philae, Egypt Isis (Ancient Greek: Ἶσις, original Egyptian pronunciation more likely "Aset" or "Iset") is a goddess in Ancient Egyptian religious beliefs, whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world. She was worshipped as the ideal mother and wife as well as the patroness of nature and magic. She was the friend of slaves, sinners, artisans and the downtrodden, but she also listened to the prayers of the wealthy, maidens, aristocrats and rulers.[1] Isis is often depicted as the mother of Horus, the hawk-headed god of war and protection (although in some traditions Horus's mother was Hathor). Isis is also known as protector of the dead and goddess of children. This myth became very important during the Greco-Roman period. Etymology[edit] The name Isis is the Greek version of her name, with a final -s added to the original Egyptian form because of the grammatical requirements of the Greek language (-s often being a marker of the nominative case in ancient Greek).

The Bhagavad Gita as an Integral Part of the Epic Mahabharata The Bhagavad Gita as an Integral Part of the Epic Mahabharata The Bhagavad Gita is an integral part of a vast epic, the great Sanskrit poem, The Mahabharata. According to the scholar J.A.B. van Buitenen the Mahabharata has had an immense influence, more than any other text, on Indian civilization. The Mahabharata is not just another tale of the ceaseless human drama, but it is ‘the storehouse of political wisdom, philosophical doctrine, religious doctrines, and a splendid work of literary art’ (M.N. Dutt). Indian tradition has accepted Krishna Dvaipayana Vyasa as poet author of the Mahabharata. Before paper was introduced in 1000 AD, the Sanskrit texts were written on birch bark in the upper north India and palm leaf in the south (J.A.B. van Buitenen). With 100,000 couplets, the Mahabharata is the world’s longest poem and the longest literary work. The dates for the writing of the Mahabharata vary. As Hamlet says: There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, While the Gods Play

Nephthys Etymology[edit] Nephthys - Musée du Louvre, Paris, France Nephthys is the Greek form of an epithet (transliterated as Nebet-het, and Nebt-het, from Egyptian hieroglyphs).The origin of the goddess Nephthys is unclear but the literal translation of her name is usually given as "Lady of the House," which has caused some to mistakenly identify her with the notion of a "housewife," or as the primary lady who ruled a domestic household. This is a pervasive error repeated in many commentaries concerning this deity. Her name means quite specifically, "Lady of the [Temple] Enclosure" which associates her with the role of priestess. Function[edit] Nephthys was known in some ancient Egyptian temple theologies and cosmologies as the "Useful Goddess" or the "Excellent Goddess".[2] These late Ancient Egyptian temple texts describe a goddess who represented divine assistance and protective guardianship. Triad of Isis, Nephthys, and Harpocrates. Pyramid Text Utterance 222 line 210.[11] Symbolism[edit]

Sumerian Gods and Goddesses Sumerian Gods Is Anu holding the symbolic Holy Grail of a Bloodline he created? British Museum Nephilim, Anunnaki - Royal Bloodline - Creators "Those who from Heaven to Earth came" The Sumerian King List allegedly recorded all the rulers of Earth over 400,000 years who were said to be gods, demigods, or immortals ... or one soul playing all the roles. In Sumerian Mythology the Anunnaki were a pantheon of good and evil gods and goddesses (duality) who came to Earth to create the human race. Talismans | Kabbalah | Amulets Creating Bloodlines According to Ancient Alien Theory, the Anunnaki, and other alien groups, came to Earth and seeded the human race in many variations. Physical evidence of ancient astronauts is found throughout the planet, leading one to conclude that different races visited here at different periods in Earth's history, or the same aliens return and set up various programs (civilizations) in which they could remain and experience. These would include: Middle East, Egypt, India,

Nut (goddess) Nut (/nʌt/ or /nuːt/)[1] or Neuth (/nuːθ/ or /njuːθ/; also spelled Nuit or Newet) was the goddess of the sky in the Ennead of Egyptian mythology. She was seen as a star-covered nude woman arching over the earth,[2] or as a cow. Great goddess Nut with her wings stretched across a coffin A sacred symbol of Nut was the ladder, used by Osiris to enter her heavenly skies. This ladder-symbol was called maqet and was placed in tombs to protect the deceased, and to invoke the aid of the deity of the dead. A huge cult developed about Osiris that lasted well into Roman times. The sky goddess Nut depicted as a cow Ra, the sun god, was the second to rule the world, according to the reign of the gods. Some of the titles of Nut were: Nut was the goddess of the sky and all heavenly bodies, a symbol of protecting the dead when they enter the after life. Collier, Mark and Manley, Bill.

The Battle with the Titans - Classical Mythology With his rescued siblings, Zeus had the beginnings of an army with which to challenge Cronus. However, Cronus had some difficulty in assembling his own forces. Some of the Titans refused to help him in the struggle. None of the Titanesses participated, and Oceanus, Cronus's brother, also refused to fight. Prometheus possessed the gift of prophecy, which is why he pledged his loyalty to Zeus. In preparation for war, each side created fortifications. The war was a monumental conflict. Gaia told Zeus that freeing the Cyclopes and Hecatoncheires from Tartarus would gain the Olympians some very powerful allies. With these giants newly recruited to Zeus's army, the tide of the war began to turn. Zeus laid siege to Mount Othrys.

Egyptian pyramids found by infra-red satellite images Seventeen lost pyramids are among the buildings identified in a new satellite survey of Egypt. More than 1,000 tombs and 3,000 ancient settlements were also revealed by looking at infra-red images which show up underground buildings. Initial excavations have already confirmed some of the findings, including two suspected pyramids. The work has been pioneered at the University of Alabama at Birmingham by US Egyptologist Dr Sarah Parcak. She says she was amazed at how much she and her team has found. "We were very intensely doing this research for over a year. "To excavate a pyramid is the dream of every archaeologist," she said. The team analysed images from satellites orbiting 700km above the earth, equipped with cameras so powerful they can pin-point objects less than 1m in diameter on the earth's surface. Infra-red imaging was used to highlight different materials under the surface. And she believes there are more antiquities to be discovered:

Mythical Chronology of Greece This Mythical Chronology of Greece depicts the traditional chronology established for the events of ancient Greek mythology by ancient chronographers and mythographers. This list largely reflects the work of Saint Jerome, whose work in turn was based primarily on the analysis of Apollodorus, Diodorus Siculus, and Eusebius. [1] In a few cases, the chronology also reflects the opinions of more recent scholars, who have cross referenced the mythology to archeological discoveries. These interpolations are noted with italics. Although the Greeks did believe that much of their mythology was grounded in fact, this list is not intended to imply the literal existence of real-world parallels to all the characters listed below. The dates below are approximate. Timeline The ages referenced in this section are the five Ages of Man of Hesiod. Before Hesiod's ages: The Birth of the World (1800BC-1710BC) Chaos gives birth to Gaia Gaia gives birth to Uranus Uranus rapes Gaia. Cronos becomes ruler of Greece.

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