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25 Ways To Plot, Plan and Prep Your Story

25 Ways To Plot, Plan and Prep Your Story
I’m a panster at heart, plotter by necessity — and I always advocate learning how to plot and plan because inevitably someone on the business side of things is going to poke you with a pointy stick and say, “I want this.” Thus you will demonstrate your talent. Even so, in choosing to plot on your own, you aren’t limited to a single path. And so it is that we take a look at the myriad plotting techniques (“plotniques?”) you might use as Storyteller Extraordinaire to get the motherfucking job done. Let us begin. The Basic Vanilla Tried-And-True Outline The basic and essential outline. The Reverse Outline Start at the end, instead. Tentpole Moments A story in your head may require certain keystone events to be part of the plot. Beginning, Middle, End A Series Of Sequences Chapter-By-Chapter For novel writers, you can chart your story by its chapters. Beat Sheet Mind-Maps Happy blocks and bubbles connected to winding bendy spokes connected to a central topical hub. Zero Draft Write A Script Collage

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Mapping a Storyworld Timeline World first, then Plot. This is the mantra I think is so important for developing an episodic series. The principle being that a series lives and dies by it’s dramatic sustainability and if you focus on plot before fully considering the rules, contexts and natural pressures of your story-world, you run the risk of writing your series into an unsustainable hole. A good series should become self perpetuating by the natural dramatic momentum generated by it’s story world.

Notes and diagrams show how famous authors including J.K. Rowling and Sylvia Plath planned out their novels By Tara Brady Published: 17:33 GMT, 18 May 2013 | Updated: 00:52 GMT, 20 May 2013 Gathering your thoughts when writing a novel can be a tricky process. Which is why many of the greats made sure they planned their plots beforehand. A mini-collection of notes penned by writers including James Salter and J.K.

Novel Plotting Worksheet Want to help support the author? There are hundreds, possibly thousands of articles on novel plotting on the web. There are a few plotting worksheets, with spaces and questions for you to fill in your own work – some of them are good. Transmedia Case Study: The Three Little Pigs If the Three Little Pigs were told as a transmedia story it might be designed like this: The basic story would be told in an anchoring medium, such as a novel, TV show, or film. In this case, it’s a short story.There are four primary characters to expand and explore: three pigs and a wolf. There are also deeper themes of hard work, planning, collaboration, family and persistence underlying the main story arc.The first round of expansion: Pig 1 has a blog which details the family history and complicated family dynamics that led to the pigs decision to live apart rather than together.

Novel Planning Tools and Worksheets We recently talked about preparing for NaNoWriMo during October, and I shared some of my own plans such as using the Snowflake Method for this novel's outline. Today I'd like to share some of the best resources for helping you plan your NaNoWriMo novel (or any novel for that matter). Here are links to character planning resources and some of my favorite more general tools and templates related to planning and outlining your novel.

The Storytelling Mandala: Purpose-Inspired Transmedia Storytelling Marketers have always used stories to share information, change opinions and influence decisions. Now, as people create, consume and share brand stories in new ways, marketers need to go beyond the 30-sec product ad or the 300-word press release, and tell purpose-inspired transmedia stories that inspire, organize and energize people. Six Trends in Storytelling Let’s start by recapturing the six important trends that are reshaping how people create, consume and share brand stories: These six trends play an important role in the narrative arc we will draw next: from Hero’s Journey to Heroes to Everyday Heroes.

Writing an Outline of Your Novel By Glen C. Strathy* The final stage of preparation - writing an outline for your novel - builds on everything you have done so far. So if you haven't yet read the following articles, you may want to do so before we go further: Part 1: Choosing an Idea.Part 2: Choosing a Story Goal.Part 3: Creating a Plot Outline in 8 Easy Steps.Part 4: Plot DevelopmentPart 5: Creating Archetypal Characters.Part 6: Making Characters Memorable and Believable.Part 7: Choosing Your Main Character and His/Her Essential CounterpartPart 8: Choosing a SettingPart 9: Choosing a Theme Naturally, you don't have to follow these articles step-by-step in order.

The 4 Story Structures that Dominate Novels All stories contain four elements that can determine structure: milieu, idea, character and event. While each is present in every story, there is generally one that dominates the others. Which one dominates? The one that the author cares about most. This is why the process of discovering the structure of a story is usually a process of self-discovery. Which aspect of the story matters most to you? s Ultimate Guide to Transmedia Filmmakers and artists have been exploring transmedia, or new ways to tell stories in innovative and immersive ways using different platforms and new technology. As filmmakers experiment with transmedia storytelling, they continue to look to Indiewire for resources on the best practices and tips for creating transmedia projects. Even though transmedia is still in its early stages, Indiewire has already gathered quite a bit on the topic, and we've got a list of our essential reading below. Feel free to bookmark this page; we'll keep it updated when we publish new articles that are essential reads for those wanting to know more about the space.

201 Ways to Arouse Your Creativity Arouse your creativity Electric flesh-arrows … traversing the body. A rainbow of color strikes the eyelids. A foam of music falls over the ears. Story, interrupted: why we need new approaches to digital narrative by Pedro Monteiro | September 8, 2011 The way we tell stories in print has been mostly the same for some time now. Space constraints and graphic layout have made the narrative flow a broken one.

Create A Plot Outline In 8 Easy Steps By Glen C. Strathy How would you like to create a plot outline for your novel in less than an hour that is emotionally compelling and dramatically sound? It's easier than you think. The secret is to incorporate the 8 Basic Plot Elements.

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