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The Earth and Beyond

The Earth and Beyond
Welcome to The Earth and Beyond Hello, my name is Tim O'Brien. I'm an astronomer working at The University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory. Exploding stars You may know the names of some patterns of stars (called constellations) such as Orion or the Great Bear. This picture shows Orion the Hunter and Taurus the Bull with the position of an exploded star known as the Crab Nebula. We're all made of stars Understanding why stars explode is very important because most of the chemical elements (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and so on) were made inside stars and are spread out into space when they explode. Billions of years ago the Sun, Earth and the other planets formed out of the leftovers from one of these gigantic explosions. Learn about astronomy Exploding stars is just one example of why astronomy is important and fun. Good luck with your studies! Constellation picture from Stellarium by Fabien Chereau. Related:  Stars, Astronomy & Black holesScience and ICT

BBC Space – Explore the planets, black holes, stars and more Star Walk 2 Night Sky Map: Watch Stars and Planets on the App Store Astronomy For Kids Jamie's Ministry of Food | Home | Jamie Oliver "I want to inspire you to get in the kitchen and cook meals for yourself and your family from scratch, whether you're a complete beginner or a good cook who likes simplicity. With some basic skills under your belt and a handful of recipes, you'll be able to prepare nutritious meals on any budget." Jamie Oliver Tower Hamlets Council join the Ministry of Food campaign to improve residents' cooking skills Thu 16th Apr 2015 10:16READ MORE Ministry of Food Bradford celebrates 5th Birthday Mon 08th Dec 2014 15:08READ MORE Ministry of Food centres proven to improve diet Mon 27th Oct 2014 11:27READ MORE Premiership clubs to kickstart cooking lessons Fri 10th Oct 2014 15:10READ MORE Click on a thumbnail to find out more. Discuss cooking and more. subject

Station Spacewalk Game <center><div class="site_errors"><div class="floatType_site_error_top"></div><div class="floatType_site_error"><table summary="layout table"><tr><td bgcolor="#000000"><font color="#ffffff"><h2><img src="/templateimages/redesign/modules/overlay/site_error.gif" title="Site Error" alt="Site Error"/>There's a problem with your browser or settings. </h2></font><font color="#ffffff"><p>Your browser or your browser's settings are not supported. To get the best experience possible, please download a compatible browser. If you know your browser is up to date, you should check to ensure that javascript is enabled. </p></font><p><a target="_blank" href="/home/How_to_enable_Javascript.html">&rsaquo; Learn How</a></p></td></tr></table></div><div class="floatType_site_error_bottom"></div></div></center> Follow this link to skip to the main content NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration Charles F. Lori B. Multimedia Images Videos Podcasts Interactive Features 3D Resources RSS Feeds Blogs Gameplay

Curious Kids: Where do black holes lead to? This is an article from Curious Kids, a series for children. The Conversation is asking kids to send in questions they’d like an expert to answer. All questions are welcome – serious, weird or wacky! You might also like the podcast Imagine This, a co-production between ABC KIDS listen and The Conversation, based on Curious Kids. Hi. My name is Merion and my question to Curious Kids is: where do black holes lead to? Hi Merion. Black holes can form when a massive star dies. These stars are also made up of very hot gas which lets off a lot of heat. Normally the pull from gravity and the push from the heat balance each other out. Read more: Curious Kids: Does space go on forever? You will never be able to escape a black hole Because black holes are made up of a lot of mass squished into a very small area of space (in science speak we say black holes are very dense) they create a lot of gravity. Sadly, it is really hard to get a camera good enough to take pictures like that.

Healthy Eating Welcome to the Healthy eating module for children aged 5-8 years. This module supports primary school children learning about healthy eating, as depicted by the eatwell plate and is comprised of a comprehensive Teachers' Guide and three Key Facts; Key Fact 1 - Food is a basic requirement for life; Key fact 2 - People choose different types of food; Key Fact 3 - We all need to eat a variety and balance of food to stay healthy, as depicted in the eatwell plate. The Key Facts are the key messages and skills children need to know and ensure that children's learning is coherent and progressive. Interactive activities This module is supported by four exciting activities. Make a balanced plate (The eatwell plate and its food groups.) Make a healthy lunchbox (Create a healthy lunchbox in line with The eatwell plate.) Unmuddle the meals (Investiagte a range of meals and food groups from The eatwell plate.) This module is also available in Welsh.

StarChild: A Learning Center for Young Astronomers The StarChild site is a service of the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), Dr. Alan Smale (Director), within the Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at NASA/GSFC. StarChild Authors: The StarChild Team StarChild Graphics & Music: Acknowledgments StarChild Project Leader: Dr. Laura A. Whitlock Curator: Responsible NASA Official: If you have comments or questions about the StarChild site, please send them to us. The Elements Revealed: An Interactive Periodic Table In the October 2011 issue of Scientific American, we celebrate the International Year of Chemistry. Learn more about its impact on our daily lives in our Special Report. UPDATED: 06/18/2013 In honor of the 2013 Lindau meeting, which focuses on chemistry, we have updated our interactive periodic table with links to Nature Chemistry's In Your Element essay series. Each essay tells the story of a particular element, often describing its discovery, history and eventual uses. Main Sources & More to Explore: The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York. Interactive by Krista Fuentes Davide Castelvecchi Davide Castelvecchi is a freelance science writer based in Rome and a contributing editor for Scientific American magazine.

Star Dust Stardust Lawrence Krauss Tags: science Posted in Facts Comments Hey Posted by Jon on 7/8/2010 6:19:26 PM I prefer the way Carl Sagan said it: The Universe is all that is, or ever was, or ever will be. Posted by Gary on 7/12/2010 1:23:41 AM if we are made of stardust,how are the world-wars are thrust upon us ? Posted by sastri on 8/17/2010 6:56:03 AM @sastri No. Posted by Geoff on 10/14/2010 2:09:57 PM I don't have much use for wars but they're part of the picture as point counter point yin-yang and the billion other contraries assembling in our plane. Posted by jim on 11/16/2010 3:02:31 AM Eh, whats for dinner? Posted by Punatic on 12/4/2010 4:51:12 AM everyone should tell me why this matters. Posted by truth on 2/21/2011 2:28:35 AM The Human body is made almost 3/4 of water which is 2/3 hydrogen. Posted by not technically correct on 2/21/2011 3:21:14 PM People sure enjoy bRagging about how smart they are compared to others. Posted by Defiant John on 2/22/2011 5:51:24 AM Hmm... fruity, but kool hahaha

Welcome to skoool.co.uk ARKive - Discover the world's most endangered species Wildscreen's Arkive project was launched in 2003 and grew to become the world's biggest encyclopaedia of life on Earth. With the help of over 7,000 of the world’s best wildlife filmmakers and photographers, conservationists and scientists, Arkive.org featured multi-media fact-files for more than 16,000 endangered species. Freely accessible to everyone, over half a million people every month, from over 200 countries, used Arkive to learn and discover the wonders of the natural world. Since 2013 Wildscreen was unable to raise sufficient funds from trusts, foundations, corporates and individual donors to support the year-round costs of keeping Arkive online. As a small conservation charity, Wildscreen eventually reached the point where it could no longer financially sustain the ongoing costs of keeping Arkive free and online or invest in its much needed development. Therefore, a very hard decision was made to take the www.arkive.org website offline in February 2019.

Apps for Smartphones and Tablets NASA Spinoff NASA Spinoff profiles the best examples of technology that have been transferred from NASA research and missions into commercial products. From life-saving satellite systems to hospital robots that care for patients and more, NASA technologies benefit society. There's more space in your life than you think! Images of Change Human activities, a changing climate and natural disasters are rapidly altering the face of our planet. › Read More › Get the iPad App→ NASA App The NASA App showcases a huge collection of the latest NASA content, including images, videos on-demand, NASA Television, mission information, news & feature stories, latest tweets, ISS sighting opportunities, satellite tracking, Third Rock Radio and much more. › Learn More › Get the iPhone/iPad App → › Get the Android App → NASA Television The NASA Television App brings live and on-demand TV programming to your phone. › Get the iPhone/iPad App→ Other NASA Apps by Topic: Centers Aeronautics Station & Shuttle Solar System

For Educators Search Educational Resources Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword. These lesson plans and teaching materials support your STEM curriculum. NASA Wavelength A digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels – from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. NASA Education YouTube Channel A-Z List of Publications A-Z List of Websites Educator Resource Centers for Teaching Materials and Workshops

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