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Mythical Chronology of Greece

Mythical Chronology of Greece
This Mythical Chronology of Greece depicts the traditional chronology established for the events of ancient Greek mythology by ancient chronographers and mythographers. This list largely reflects the work of Saint Jerome, whose work in turn was based primarily on the analysis of Apollodorus, Diodorus Siculus, and Eusebius. [1] In a few cases, the chronology also reflects the opinions of more recent scholars, who have cross referenced the mythology to archeological discoveries. These interpolations are noted with italics. Although the Greeks did believe that much of their mythology was grounded in fact, this list is not intended to imply the literal existence of real-world parallels to all the characters listed below. The dates below are approximate. Timeline The ages referenced in this section are the five Ages of Man of Hesiod. Before Hesiod's ages: The Birth of the World (1800BC-1710BC) Chaos gives birth to Gaia Gaia gives birth to Uranus Uranus rapes Gaia. Cronos becomes ruler of Greece. Related:  GreeceΕλλάδ, Grèce, Grecia,GreeceMythology

Greek Creation Story, Cronus and Rhea and Birth of Zeus According to Greek mythology, in the beginning there was nothing. This was called Chaos. From this nothingness came light, Mother Earth (Gaia) and Sky (Uranus) were formed. From Gaia and Uranus came six twins known as the Titans. The six twin Titans were named Oceanus and Thethys, Coeos and Phoebe, Hyperion and Thea, Creos and Themis, Iapetos and Clymene, and finally Cronos and Rhea. Gaia and Uranus also gave birth to three Cyclopes, three giants, each with fifty heads and one-hundred arms. Cronos cast the cut off genitals into the sea. After defeating his father, Cronos married his sister Rhea. Major Gods and Goddesses Aphrodite | Apollo | Ares | Artemis | Athena | Demeter | Dionysus Hades | Hephaestus | Hera | Hermes | Hestia | Poseidon | Zeus Heroes Achilles | Aeneas | Diomedes | Hector | Hercules | Jason | Odysseus | Perseus | Theseus Stories Introduction | Creation Story | Olympians VS. Original Sources of Greek-Roman Mythology Bibliography Follow our updates on Facebook or Twitter

Greek Gods Family Tree / Genealogy | ludios.org Doing homework? Your teacher has already seen this. See Theoi; it has properly-sourced information. Known errors: Generally inconsistent sourcing. Greek Stories about Zeus-The Birth of Zeus, the King of the Gods Zeus was born by the Titans Cronus and Rhea. Cronus was notorious for being a very jealous and greedy deity. Out of the fear one of his children could take his throne, Cronus swallowed every child Rhea was giving birth to. However, when Rhea gave birth to her last child, Zeus, she managed to trick Cronus with the help of the Titans Uranus and Gaea. Zeus was raised secretly by the Nymphs and was fed with honey and milk from the goat nurse Amaltheia with the help of her broken-off horn. Soon came the day where Zeus was mature enough to claim the Kingdom of the World and he started a battle against his father and the Titans. Then, with the help of his siblings, Zeus overthrew the Titans in the depths of the Underworld, the Tartarus. After overthrowing his father Cronus, Zeus was confronted with the Giants and also the monster Typhon, which he both defeated successfully.

Introduction to Hindu Mythology Hindu religion is more philosophy than doctrine. There is no authoritative hierarchy of clergy; the religion is highly decentralized with multiple sects, perfectly acceptable to Hinduism (in contrast to the regrettable divisions within Christianity). The Hindu claim that there are different paths for each person. A practical definition of Hinduism: performing the duty (dharma) of one's stage in life and social status (caste). The essence of the Hindu vision of reality lies in the tension between dharma (social duty or righteousness) and moksha (release from the material world, final liberation from the endless cycles of rebirth). Both these perspectives, the world-supporting and the world-denying, are necessary to fulfill human destiny. Other important terms : karma = moral law of cause and effect (deeds of past lives determine present) samsara = rebirth according to the nature of a person's karma; what we are now is the sum of all we have done in the past. Dharma and caste Cycles of time

Mahabharatha and Trojan war - Greek influence on India Pandavas were sent to forest for 14 years, similarly the Greek-Trojan conflict went on for nearly 14 years. The actual conflict described by Homer in Iliad is only 14 days. Same is the case with Mahabharata war, the war at Kurukshetra went on only for 14 days. During the Mahabharata war, the war was stopped in the evenings and was resumed in the next day. Then, why such a story had been written? Note another character in the war scene, Sanjayan describes the war, scene by scene to the blind king Dhridarashra, using his extraordinary vision. Bhishma had taken the role of Hector, the righteous son of Priam, Duryodhana has taken the role of Paris.

Family tree of the Greek gods Key: The essential Olympians' names are given in bold font. See also List of Greek mythological figures Notes External links Media related to Family trees of Greek mythology at Wikimedia Commons The Battle with the Titans - Classical Mythology With his rescued siblings, Zeus had the beginnings of an army with which to challenge Cronus. However, Cronus had some difficulty in assembling his own forces. Some of the Titans refused to help him in the struggle. None of the Titanesses participated, and Oceanus, Cronus's brother, also refused to fight. Prometheus possessed the gift of prophecy, which is why he pledged his loyalty to Zeus. In preparation for war, each side created fortifications. The war was a monumental conflict. Gaia told Zeus that freeing the Cyclopes and Hecatoncheires from Tartarus would gain the Olympians some very powerful allies. With these giants newly recruited to Zeus's army, the tide of the war began to turn. Zeus laid siege to Mount Othrys.

The Bhagavad Gita as an Integral Part of the Epic Mahabharata The Bhagavad Gita as an Integral Part of the Epic Mahabharata The Bhagavad Gita is an integral part of a vast epic, the great Sanskrit poem, The Mahabharata. According to the scholar J.A.B. van Buitenen the Mahabharata has had an immense influence, more than any other text, on Indian civilization. The Mahabharata is not just another tale of the ceaseless human drama, but it is ‘the storehouse of political wisdom, philosophical doctrine, religious doctrines, and a splendid work of literary art’ (M.N. Dutt). Indian tradition has accepted Krishna Dvaipayana Vyasa as poet author of the Mahabharata. Before paper was introduced in 1000 AD, the Sanskrit texts were written on birch bark in the upper north India and palm leaf in the south (J.A.B. van Buitenen). With 100,000 couplets, the Mahabharata is the world’s longest poem and the longest literary work. The dates for the writing of the Mahabharata vary. As Hamlet says: There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, While the Gods Play

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