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Dr. Kaku's Universe

Dr. Kaku's Universe
Related:  Principle-Centered Learning Environment

Stephen Covey Stephen Richards Covey (October 24, 1932 – July 16, 2012) was an American educator, author, businessman, and keynote speaker. His most popular book was The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. His other books include First Things First, Principle-Centered Leadership, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Families, The 8th Habit, and The Leader In Me — How Schools and Parents Around the World Are Inspiring Greatness, One Child at a Time. He was a professor at the Jon M. Early life[edit] Covey was born to Stephen Glenn Covey and Irene Louise Richards Covey in Salt Lake City, Utah, on October 24, 1932.[1] Louise was the daughter of Stephen L Richards, an apostle and counselor in the first presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints under David O. Covey was athletic as a youth but contracted slipped capital femoral epiphysis in junior high school, requiring him to change his focus to academics. Education[edit] Books[edit] The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People[edit]

Dry-roasted planets: A Sun-Like Star That Tried To Eat Its Young Natalie Batalha has had plenty of experience fielding questions from both layfolk and other scientists over the past couple of years — and with good reason. Batalha is the deputy principal investigator for the spectacularly successful Kepler space telescope, which has found evidence of more than 2,000 planets orbiting distant stars so far — including, just last week, a world almost exactly the size of Earth and another the size of Venus. But Kepler is giving astronomers all sorts of new information about stars as well, and that's what a European TV correspondent wanted to know about during an interview last year. Was it true, she asked, that stars like the sun will eventually swell up and destroy their planets? It's a common question, and Batalha recited the familiar answer, one that's been in astronomy textbooks for at least half a century: Yes, it's true. How indeed? And yet these two worlds, known as KOI 55.01 and KOI 55.02, lived through the ordeal anyway.

PhysicsCentral: Learn How Your World Works NOVA scienceNOW Can Wind Turbines Make You Sick? Residents living in the shadows of wind turbines say the sound is making them sick. But so far the science isn't there. From NOVA Next | Jun 27, 2018 Thirty Years Ago Today, Global Warming First Made Headline News On June 23, a NASA climate scientist, James Hansen, told a U.S. From NOVA Next | Jun 23, 2018 New Middle Eastern Particle Accelerator’s Motto is “Science for Peace” In a region in turmoil, an unprecedented joint venture of scientists and policymakers is working together on Jordan’s new particle accelerator under the motto "science for peace." From NOVA Next | Jun 21, 2018 Psychological Damage Inflicted By Parent-Child Separation is Deep, Long-Lasting Here's what happens in the brain and the body when a child is forcibly separated from his or her parents.

The Top 10 Psychology Studies of 2010 The end of 2010 fast approaches, and I'm thrilled to have been asked by the editors of Psychology Today to write about the Top 10 psychology studies of the year. I've focused on studies that I personally feel stand out, not only as examples of great science, but even more importantly, as examples of how the science of psychology can improve our lives. Each study has a clear "take home" message, offering the reader an insight or a simple strategy they can use to reach their goals , strengthen their relationships, make better decisions, or become happier. If you extract the wisdom from these ten studies and apply them in your own life, 2011 just might be a very good year. 1) How to Break Bad Habits If you are trying to stop smoking , swearing, or chewing your nails, you have probably tried the strategy of distracting yourself - taking your mind off whatever it is you are trying not to do - to break the habit. J. 2) How to Make Everything Seem Easier J. 3) How To Manage Your Time Better M. J.

Salman Khan (educator) Salman Amin "Sal" Khan[2] is a Bangladeshi American[3] educator, entrepreneur, and former hedge fund analyst. He is the founder of the Khan Academy, a free online education platform and nonprofit organization. From a small office in his home, Khan has produced more than 4,800 video lessons teaching a wide spectrum of academic subjects, mainly focusing on mathematics and the sciences.[4] Salman Khan was born and raised in Metairie, Louisiana.[8] His mother was born in Calcutta, India and his father was born in Barisal, Bangladesh.[3] Khan attended the public school Grace King High School in Metairie, Louisiana, where, as he recalls, "a few classmates were fresh out of jail and others were bound for top universities Khan attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, graduating with a BS in mathematics, a BS in electrical engineering and computer science, and an MS in electrical engineering and computer science in 1998.[10] Khan was class president in his senior year.[11]

Can 1 miracle plant solve the world's 3 greatest problems? If someone were to tell you that they had a technology — a weed actually — that could sequester huge amounts of carbon permanently while lifting villagers out of poverty by providing both protein-rich food and super-insulated building materials, you might start to wonder if they were, well, smoking a different weed. But it appears that one retired building contractor, Bill Loftus, has actually come upon a brilliant application of the fast-growing, carbon-sucking plant known as Kenaf. Kenaf is in the Hibiscus family and is thus related to both cotton and okra. Originally from Africa, this 4,000-year-old crop was used for its fiber. It has the astonishing ability to grow up to 14 feet in one growing season, yielding 6-10 tons of fiber per acre and making it a great source of pulp for paper. But researchers have also discovered (PDF) a corresponding ability of Kenaf to inhale huge quantities of our most abundant global warming gas — CO2. But its not enough to simply absorb CO2.

Skeptic » Home » The Skeptics Society & Skeptic magazine AR.Drone.com USA - Parrot Wi-Fi quadricopter. Augmented Reality games on iPhone, iPod touch and iPad “Create high-quality and stable movie shots” The Director mode lets you program automaticmovements so that you can shoot great videos justlike a movie director. Choose your movement: traveling, pan, crane… Adjust speed and moves in real time to compose your video sequence Stabilization system and video post-processing to get clean smooth shots Tune camera settings such as white balance, exposure and luminosity Selection of key sequences in the video Video sharing on YouTube and AR.Drone Academy *In-app purchase on ar.freeflight Learn more Camera moves

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