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Center for News Literacy – Bringing crucial critical thinking skills for the 21st century to teachers and students

Center for News Literacy – Bringing crucial critical thinking skills for the 21st century to teachers and students

http://www.centerfornewsliteracy.org/

Related:  Week 12: Teaching/Coaching/Spreading the Word (*=Key reading)Week 6 Part 1: Media/News/Visual Literacy (*=Key reading)Media, social media and New media

Standards for Distance Learning Library Services Approved by the ACRL Board of Directors, July 2008. Revised June 2016. Standards for Distance Learning Library Services Worksheet (.XLSX, 2018 Supplemental Worksheet) Contents Part I FoundationsExecutive Summary: The Access Entitlement PrincipleIntroduction: A Living DocumentAudienceDefinitionsChanging Nature of “Distance”

Teaching Digital Literacy Presented by Michelle Luhtala, Head Librarian, New Canaan High School, CT; and Joyce Valenza, Assistant Teaching Professor, Rutgers University, MI Program Sponsored by Mackin Educational Resources If you attended the live session, you’ll be emailed a CE certificate within 24 hours of the webinar. If you view the recording or listen to the podcast and would like a CE certificate, join the Emerging Tech community and go to the Webinar Archives folder to take the CE quiz. How to Spot Fake News Fake news is nothing new. But bogus stories can reach more people more quickly via social media than what good old-fashioned viral emails could accomplish in years past. Concern about the phenomenon led Facebook and Google to announce that they’ll crack down on fake news sites, restricting their ability to garner ad revenue. Perhaps that could dissipate the amount of malarkey online, though news consumers themselves are the best defense against the spread of misinformation.

*Privacy, Consent, and the Virtual One-Shot – ACRLog (the current academic library situation) Guest poster Nora Almeida is an instruction and outreach librarian at the New York City College of Technology (CUNY) and a volunteer at Interference Archive. Nora researches and writes about critical pedagogy, social justice, neoliberalism, performance, and place. You can find her on twitter: @nora_almeida. In April 2020, when the City University of New York (CUNY) shifted classes and student services online, the one-shot library instruction sessions mostly stopped all together. News and Media Literacy: Building Critical Consumers and Creators Presented by Kelly Mendoza, Senior Director of Learning and Engagement, Common Sense Education Hosted by Common Sense Education and Sponsored by Symantec If you attended the live session, you’ll be emailed a CE certificate within 24 hours of the webinar. If you view the recording and would like a CE certificate, join the Digital Learning & Leadership community and go to the Webinar Archives folder to take the CE quiz. More and more, young people (and adults) are getting their news online and from social media. There is also the increasingly problematic issue of fake news and determining credible news sources online.

CNN Profiles - Brian Stelter - Host, Reliable Sources & Senior Media Correspondent Brian Stelter is the host of "Reliable Sources," which examines the week's top media stories every Sunday at 11:00 a.m. ET on CNN/U.S, and the senior media correspondent for CNN Worldwide. Stelter reports and writes for CNN and CNNMoney. Prior to joining CNN in November 2013, Stelter was a media reporter at The New York Times. Starting in 2007, he covered television and digital media for the Business Day and Arts section of the newspaper. Teen Vogue's Political Coverage Isn’t Surprising - The Atlantic On Saturday morning, Teen Vogue published an op-ed by Lauren Duca titled “Donald Trump Is Gaslighting America.” The tone and message of the piece, which compared the ways in which the president-elect talks about his record to the ways abusive spouses psychologically manipulate their partners, struck a notable chord with readers on social media, garnering almost 30,000 retweets from Teen Vogue’s account, and getting shared by personalities from Patton Oswalt to Dan Rather. Many people tweeting the story did so with an incredulous tone, seeming surprised that a teen-oriented magazine was publishing incisive political coverage rather than makeup tutorials or One Direction interviews. But the tone of Duca’s piece was representative of a larger shift Teen Vogue has made over the last year. In May, 29-year-old Elaine Welteroth took over as editor from Amy Astley, who helped found the magazine in 2003. At the time, Carr noted, many rival teen publications were struggling.

Tutorials & Videos - The Claremont Colleges Library Start Your Research contains 4 modules, each requiring 10-15 minutes to complete. After completing all of the modules, learners will be able to Understand the goal(s) of your assignmentDetermine the information you needExplain how knowledge is created over timeFind the information you need in the library Module 1: Understand Your Assignment By the end of this module, you’ll be able to *Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world We were guaranteed a free press, We were not guaranteed a neutral or a true press. We can celebrate the journalistic freedom to publish without interference from the state. We can also celebrate our freedom to share multiple stories through multiple lenses. But it has always been up to the reader or viewer to make the reliability and credibility decisions.

About Me & Disclosures JEFF JARVIS is the author of Geeks Bearing Gifts: Imagining New Futures for News (CUNY Journalism Press, 2014), Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live (Simon & Schuster, 2011), What Would Google Do? (HarperCollins 2009), and the Kindle Single Gutenberg the Geek. He blogs about media and news at Buzzmachine.com and cohosts the podcast This Week in Google. He is professor and director of the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at the City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism. He advises media companies, startups, and foundations and is a public speaker. Until 2005, he was president and creative director of Advance.net, the online arm of Advance Publications.

USA Today: Students need to know this for media literacy Students today are increasingly turning to online new sources to meet their research needs. Because of this, it is important for educators to teach students about trustworthy news sources and separating real news from fake news—but how can teachers impart these media literacy skills when trends in journalism are constantly shifting? In “Media Literacy: A Crash Course in 60 Minutes,” hosted by edWeb.net and sponsored by Mackin Educational Resources, Michelle Luhtala, Library Department Chair at New Canaan High School, CT, interviewed Greg Toppo, the National Education and Demographics reporter for USA Today, about today’s shifting trends in journalism and how teachers can help students identify reliable sources.

Education Services - University at Buffalo Libraries Librarians from the University at Buffalo (UB) Libraries are active participants in building the information literacy competencies of students at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels. UB librarians work with faculty and teaching assistants to introduce research resources, consult on research projects, provide information literacy instruction, and integrate library resources into programs, courses, and curricula. Micro-CredentialsThe Advanced Information Literate badge is designed to build upon a student’s search skills and expertise in the information literacy concepts that underpin scholarship at a Tier 1 Research Institute. WorkshopsThe Libraries work with other areas on campus to offer workshops on a variety of subjects relevant to students, faculty, and staff.

Lesson plan: How to teach your students about fake news Fake news is making news, and it’s a problem. Not only did a BuzzFeed data analysis find that viral stories falsely claiming that the Pope endorsed Donald Trump and that Hillary Clinton sold weapons to terrorists receive more Facebook attention than the most popular news stories from established news outlets, but a false story about child trafficking in a Washington, D.C. pizza restaurant inspired a North Carolina man to drive 5 hours with a shotgun and other weapons to investigate. This lesson gives students media literacy skills they need to navigate the media, including how to spot fake news. Subjects Social studies, U.S. government, civics, journalism Estimated Time

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