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THC Gives Cancer Cells the Munchies Too : The Scientific Activist

THC Gives Cancer Cells the Munchies Too : The Scientific Activist
Through the results of widespread experimentation of the… well… let’s say “non-scientific” variety, it’s pretty well known that marijuana has the side effect of making the user very hungry. This is one of the many physiological effects of the active ingredient THC (?9-tetrahydrocannabinol). More relevantly, however, THC and other cannabinoids are actively being investigated for various useful clinical purposes, including the treatment of cancer through the inhibition of tumor growth. A new study by Salazar et al. in The Journal of Clinical Investigation demonstrates that THC causes tumor cells to begin to degrade themselves from the inside (a process called autophagy, i.e. “self-eating”). Despite the imagery that the title of this post (and maybe even casual experience) may imply, it’s not that THC causes cancer cells to ravenously and indiscriminately destroy themselves. Mostly, this is interesting (to me) more for the big picture aspect and the implications for clinical medicine.

http://scienceblogs.com/scientificactivist/2009/04/02/thc-gives-cancer-cells-the-mun/

Related:  Medical Cannabis Review

Weed sequenced. No really — weed. (Credit: stock image) DNA sequencing hit a new high with the release of the Cannabis sativa genome, says Nature News. The raw sequence, done in Amsterdam (where else?), was posted on Amazon’s EC2 public cloud computing service by a young company called Medicinal Genomics, which aims to explore the genomes of therapeutic plants. Medicinal Genomics founder Kevin McKernan says he estimates the size of the C. sativa genome to be about 400 million bases. Marijuana Cuts Lung Cancer Tumor Growth In Half, Study Shows The active ingredient in marijuana cuts tumor growth in common lung cancer in half and significantly reduces the ability of the cancer to spread, say researchers at Harvard University who tested the chemical in both lab and mouse studies. They say this is the first set of experiments to show that the compound, Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), inhibits EGF-induced growth and migration in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expressing non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. Lung cancers that over-express EGFR are usually highly aggressive and resistant to chemotherapy. THC that targets cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 is similar in function to endocannabinoids, which are cannabinoids that are naturally produced in the body and activate these receptors. The researchers suggest that THC or other designer agents that activate these receptors might be used in a targeted fashion to treat lung cancer.

What cannabis actually does to your brain Chances are they would've ended up brainless morons with or without the pot. It's quite frankly not strong enough of a narcotic to destroy one's life such as you describe. It's very dependent on the user's persona. @Tadashii: Are you also for alcohol and tobacco prohibition? Those ruin more lives every year then marijuana has ever. Videos > Weed Wars: Medical Marijuana Hits Reality TV "Most of our patients and our staff were really skeptical about doing a reality TV show because they were watching Jersey Shore and The Kardashians," says Andrew DeAngelo, general manager of Oakland, California's Harborside Health Center, the largest medical marijuana dispensary in the world. Andrew and his brother, Harborside's Executive Director Steve DeAngleo, are co-stars of Weed Wars, a new show by the Discovery Channel that looks into lives of those who run Harborside, the patients that seek out their services, and the politicians looking to shut them down. "There are a lot of stigmas about medical cannabis patients, that we don't work hard, that we're a bunch of stoners, that we are lazy, that we are really criminals or drug traffickers," explains Andrew DeAngleo. "All that is a lie that has been perpetrated by the feds and the media." About 8.20 minutes.
Produced and edited by Meredith Bragg.

Israeli company grows medical marijuana which doesn't get you high Situated in an undisclosed location near Tzfat, northern Israel, is a government-approved medical marijuana plantation which was founded in 2004 by a retired biology teacher. Named Tikun Olam, the plantation has created a new cannabis strain which contains very low traces of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main constituent in cannabis responsible for making people feel "stoned". By virtually eliminating THC in the new strain, Tikun Olam can now offer the drug's medicinal benefits to those patients who wish to keep a clear head. Marijuana contains over 60 constituents named cannabinoids and though THC is the most famous due to its psychoactive effects, another important constituent is cannabidiol (CBD).

Cannabis hope for inflammatory bowel disease Chemicals found in cannabis could prove an effective treatment for the inflammatory bowel diseases Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease, say scientists. Laboratory tests have shown that two compounds found in the cannabis plant -- the cannabinoids THC and cannabidiol -- interact with the body's system that controls gut function. Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, which affect about one in every 250 people in Northern Europe, are caused by both genetic and environmental factors.

Molecular mechanism found that controls marijuana-like substance in body A newly discovered molecular mechanism helps control the amount and effectiveness of a substance that mimics an active ingredient in marijuana, but that is produced by the body’s own nerve cells. The results were reported in the latest Nature Neuroscience. The lead author on the study is William R. Marrs of the Neurobiology and Behavior program at the University of Washington (UW). Study confirms that cannabis is beneficial for multiple sclerosis Cannabis can reduce spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. A systematic review, published in the open access journal BMC Neurology, found that five out six randomized controlled trials reported a reduction in spasticity and an improvement in mobility. Shaheen Lakhan and Marie Rowland from the Global Neuroscience Initiative Foundation, Los Angeles, USA, searched for trials evaluating the cannabis extracts delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). According to Lakhan, "We found evidence that combined THC and CBD extracts may provide therapeutic benefit for MS spasticity symptoms." Spasticity, involuntary muscle tension or contraction, is a common symptom of MS.

How to Grow Marijuana… What Should Your Medical Marijuana Plants’ Roots Grow In? When you look at the details on how to grow marijuana, you can get mighty confused about what your marijuana roots should grow in. Obviously they have to grow in a container, because they need to be in the dark, they need to be kept moist, they need to be fed, they need oxygen. But the choices for how you achieve the right place for your marijuana roots are many. Let’s line it out here… Soil: This seems like a simple, logical choice, but it’s not as simple as you might think, because most store-bought potting soil, even kind stuff like Fox Farm Ocean Forest, just isn’t nutritious enough for long enough to feed marijuana for maximum bud production. Using soil, you’ll get bloom phase potassium, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus deficiencies unless you add fertilizer.

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