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How to Read a Compass

How to Read a Compass
Navigation by way of compass may seem daunting at first to a beginner, but this trepidation shouldn’t stand in the way of learning to use one. In fact, once you learn how to read a compass, it will be a valued friend in the back-country — one you can always count on to help guide your steps. This guide is meant to be a general overview of the basics of learning how to read a compass, with or without a map. There are only a few key things to keep in mind, and once you have grasped these fundamentals, the realm of compass navigation will be open to you forever. Compass Basics First of all, what exactly does a compass do? In addition to the floating compass needle, a compass may have a myriad of other features, but only a few are really relevant to basic orienteering. Let’s say for example that you know your home base is in a southeasterly direction, ~120 degrees of azimuth. Magnetic north or Geographic north? There is one catch, though. How to Choose a Compass

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Survive Nature - Techniques for Surviving in every Natural Environment When you find yourself lost in the forest, you should be alert to the fact that there are predators and they are dangerous. Try to fashion a spear or knife out of branches to use as protection. Among the many predators to watch out for, bears are the most dangerous (especially Grizzlies): Black Bears: If you see a black bear 50 yards away or more, then keep your distance and continue hiking always making sure to not get closer. If you happen to come across the bear and it doesn't see you, then carefully walk away and talk loudly to alert the bear to your presence. Navigating Without a Compass - Part 3 - Brian's Backpacking Blog This is the third post in my three-part series on navigating without a compass. In part one I described how you can use easily identifiable constellations to locate the north star, Polaris. In part two I showed how you can use an analog watch and the sun to quickly determine North and South.

Camping Knots for Wilderness Survival By Filip Tkaczyk Knowing how to tie good camping knots is an invaluable skill in wilderness survival situations. Its also a great asset when having fun in the outdoors. 31 How to Sites Must Check Home » How to » 31 Best How To Sites To Learn Everything You Need To Know In Internet you can find lots of site which helps you to learn lots of thing that we use in our daily life. But the question is where to find it and and how to learn lots of thing and guides free. In our daily life we are doing lots of thing such as using computer, learning web design and more and more. If you’re looking for information on How to repair a hard drive, How to Clean PC, How to Design Website, how to use web services, how to make videosor any other questions, you’ll find it in my picks for the best how to sites on the Web.

How to make a Hobo Stove Urban survival is a tricky subject to discuss. There are advantages to urban survival. Anywhere you look there are items in trash cans and dumpsters that can be used to improve a survival situation. Cardboard boxes can be used for shelter, newspapers can be used for insulation and to the practical survivor another persons trash can be a treasure. In this case we will use a coffee can to build a stove. Whether you call it a hobo stove, can stove, or just a survival stove, this is a cheap effective way to both cook and stay warm.

Guest Post: All Dogs Matter Invites You to Our Annual Valentines Dog Walk! Share the love with all four-legged friends this Sunday (February 15th 2015) and come along to enjoy a morning of furry fun in aid of All Dogs Matter. [Credit: Mike Coles] The morning begins at the very dog-friendly Garden Gate pub, Hampstead. Dogs and owners meet and head off across the Heath for a romantic stroll. Navigating Without a Compass - Part 1 - Brian's Backpacking Blog This is the first post of a three-part series in which I want to share with you some easy ways to successfully (and accurately) navigate without the aid of a magnetic compass. There are many different and well proven methods of navigating without a compass, but I’m going to focus on the three techniques that I have found to be the easiest to remember and simplest to actually use. In my opinion you should have a compass with you at all times when venturing outdoors and know how to properly use it.

7 Rock Climbing Knots Every Guy Should Know There are a lot of cool things about rock climbing, from the full-body fitness required to make it up many climbs, to the incredible ways that climbers can manage to keep their bodies on the rock, but one of the most underrated things about climbing has got to be the knots. After all, these knots aren’t just keeping shoes on your feet or a trash bag closed – they’re capable of keeping the full weight of a body from dropping right off the face of a cliff. But you don’t have to ever step foot on the rock in order to take advantage of this knowledge, as most of the common rock climbing knots can be used very effectively for other, non-climbing purposes. Here’s a selection of climbing knots that every guy (and gal) should know:

Preparedness Nuggets Index The original index page for these Preparedness Nuggets, online since 1999, practically a geezer as webpages go, was recently corrupted. Not sure how that happened, but so it did. So the original somewhat gaudily decorated page is replaced with this much more simple page. How to make a Solar Still Solar still built into a pit in the ground Solar still "Watercone" A solar still is a simple way of distilling water, using the heat of the Sun to drive evaporation from humid soil, and ambient air to cool a condenser film. Two basic types of solar stills are box and pit stills. DIY Inspiration for Up-cycling Throwaway Materials If you’re a tradesman, problem solving forms a part of your daily job, and considering the price of raw materials, you are constantly aware of reducing unnecessary waste in order to cut on costs. Next time you’re at work, inspect the site and look for gems such as unused pallets, wood cut offs and piping. These materials are often foregone and taken to dumps after a specific project has been completed, but can be transformed into something both beautiful and functional – with some crafty work of course!

Using a Compass - The Basics - Brian's Backpacking Blog I quite often run into fellow backpackers during my hikes and enjoy chatting with them about where they’re from and what they’re doing, the usual trail chit-chat. A lot of the time our conversations include discussions about the current hike and conditions along the trail, where to find water and areas to avoid if necessary, sharing information with fellow hikers is one of the best parts of meeting people along the trail, in my opinion. However, on more than one recent occasion (too often, in fact) the conversation has included the seemingly innocent question of “so, where are we on the trail – any idea?” To which I am always shocked and usually ask, “don’t you carry a map and a compass?” This elicits several knee-jerk responses, the most frequent being, “yes, but I’m not exactly sure how to use the compass,” along with a sheepish grin. Inside my head I’m thinking, “then why are you carrying it and how on earth do you navigate your position?”

Simple Survival Tips -Treating Minor Sprains and Strained Muscles During a crisis or a disaster, you may find yourself experiencing some very simple medical problems for which normal medical treatment may not be readily available. One of the more common and frequent conditions you may experience are sprained joints or muscle strain. There is a simple solution to these problems. What’s the solution? It’s raw potato juice.

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