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Results on ReadWriteThink

Results on ReadWriteThink
Find content from Thinkfinity Partners using a visual bookmarking and sharing tool. More Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Results from ReadWriteThink 1-8 of 8 Results from ReadWriteThink Sort by: Classroom Resources | Grades K – 12 | Student Interactive | Writing Poetry Acrostic Poems This online tool enables students to learn about and write acrostic poems.

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Concrete Poetry Sites - North Davidson Middle School Guest | Login Amber Crotts 7th Grade ELA & Science Diamante Poems ReadWriteThink has a variety of resources for out-of-school use. Visit our Parent & Afterschool Resources section to learn more. More Download the plug-in tools you need to use our games and tools, or check to see if you've got the latest version. Learn more The Hat - Random Name Generator Current version: 3.0.9.0License: Freeware "I'm first!" "No I'm first!""No, I called it!" "Well I'm second!"" Haiku Starter Grades 3 – 5 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Seasonal Haiku: Writing Poems to Celebrate Any Season After listening to haiku poetry, students use seasonal descriptive words to write their own haiku, following the traditional format. They then publish their poems by mounting them on illustrated backgrounds. Reading, Writing, Haiku Hiking! A Class Book of Picturesque Poems

SMS Generator Use the icons below to create a chat between two historical or fictional characters. You can save your work for future changes. You can drag and drop, edit and delete entries by hovering over them. After saving, you will also be able to get a QR Code or embed the chat into your own blog, website or wiki! Be Glad Your Nose is on Your Face On September 8, 1940, Jack Prelutsky was born in Brooklyn, and attended Hunter College in New York City. Although he claims to have hated poetry through most of his childhood, he rediscovered poetry later in life, and has devoted many years since to writing fresh, humorous poetry aimed specifically at kids. “I realized poetry was a means of communication, that it could be as exciting or as boring as that person or that experience.” In 2006, Prelutsky was named the first Children’s Poet Laureate by the Poetry Foundation. He lives in Seattle, Washington, and spends much of his time presenting poems to children in schools and libraries throughout the United States.

24 Best Poems to Teach in Middle and High School It can be hard to know which poems will spur your middle and high schoolers into deep, meaningful discussion and which will leave them, ahem, yawning. So we asked experienced teachers to share their favorites—the punch-in-the-gut poems that always get a reaction, even from teens. Here's what they had to say. 1. Snow by David Berman Captures a narrative in miniature with a creative structure. Two Browser-based Noise Meters That Show Students How Loudly They Speak Earlier this week on iPadApps4School.com I featured an app called Too Noisy that shows students how loudly they are speaking. The app measures the volume of the noise in a room and displays a meter indicating whether or not the the room is too noisy. If you don't have an iPad, you can find the same basic features in the following browser-based tools. Bouncy Balls shows students the volume of the noise in your classroom by displaying a set of colorful bouncing balls.

Writing Poetry with English Language Learners Home > ELL Topics from A to Z > Writing Poetry with English Language Learners By: Kristina Robertson (2009) I Have to Write a Poem for Class By Jack PrelutskyI have to write a poem for class But don't think I'll succeed, I know I don't know all the words That I am going to need. I cannot quite imagine How my poem's supposed to be — I've got a sinking feeling I'm not good at poetry.My poem must have a meter And it also has to rhyme, It's due tomorrow morning… How I wish I had more time! I do not think that I can write A poem the way I should — But look…this is a poem right here, And it is pretty good. Writing poetry is a great exercise for English language learners.

Learning Resources “My beard grows to my toes, I never wear no clothes, I wraps my hair Around my bare, And down the road I goes.” – “My Beard” Where the Sidewalk Ends “Needles and pins, Needles and pins, Sew me a sail To catch me the wind.” – from “Needles and Pins” Falling Up “Millie McDeevit screamed a scream So loud it made her eyebrows steam.” – from “Screamin’ Millie” Falling Up “I will not play at tug o’ war. I’d rather play at hug o’ war” – from “Hug O’ War” Where the Sidewalk Ends “If you are a dreamer, come in.” – from “Invitation” Where the Sidewalk Ends “Anything can happen, child, ANYTHING can be.” – from “Listen to the Mustn’ts" Where the Sidewalk Ends “Balancing my ABCs Takes from noon to half past three. I don’t have time to grab a T Or even stop to take a P.” – “Alphabalance” Falling Up “Last night I had a crazy dream That I was teachin’ school.

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