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Writing Poetry

Writing Poetry
Home › Results from ReadWriteThink 1-8 of 8 Results from ReadWriteThink Sort by: Classroom Resources | Grades K – 12 | Student Interactive | Writing Poetry Acrostic Poems This online tool enables students to learn about and write acrostic poems. Related:  poetry work

Inquiry and Analysis Find content from Thinkfinity Partners using a visual bookmarking and sharing tool. More Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Results from ReadWriteThink 1-7 of 7 Results from ReadWriteThink Sort by: Classroom Resources | Grades 3 – 6 | Student Interactive | Inquiry & Analysis Animal Inquiry Supporting inquiry-based research projects, the Animal Inquiry interactive invites elementary students to explore animal facts and habitats using writing prompts to guide and record their findings.

Writing Poetry with English Language Learners I Have to Write a Poem for Class By Jack PrelutskyI have to write a poem for class But don't think I'll succeed, I know I don't know all the words That I am going to need. I cannot quite imagine How my poem's supposed to be — I've got a sinking feeling I'm not good at poetry.My poem must have a meter And it also has to rhyme, It's due tomorrow morning… How I wish I had more time! I do not think that I can write A poem the way I should — But look…this is a poem right here, And it is pretty good. Writing poetry is a great exercise for English language learners. It gives them a chance to experiment with language and vocabulary, and to freely share their ideas without the confinement of perfect grammar or firm structures. Read a variety of poems first. My own knowledge of poetry forms was pretty limited before I began teaching poetry, but here are some poetry forms that work effectively with students, as well as some ideas of how to help students try their hand at writing! Group Poem Haiku

Organizing and summarizing skills: Find content from Thinkfinity Partners using a visual bookmarking and sharing tool. More Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Results from ReadWriteThink 1-10 of 21 Results from ReadWriteThink page | 1 2 3 Sort by: Classroom Resources | Grades K – 12 | Student Interactive | Organizing & Summarizing Alphabet Organizer Students use this online tool to create an alphabet chart or pages for an alphabet book.

24 Best Poems to Teach in Middle and High School It can be hard to know which poems will spur your middle and high schoolers into deep, meaningful discussion and which will leave them, ahem, yawning. So we asked experienced teachers to share their favorites—the punch-in-the-gut poems that always get a reaction, even from teens. Here's what they had to say. 1. Snow by David Berman Captures a narrative in miniature with a creative structure. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. What are your favorite poems to teach? Learning about language Home › Results from ReadWriteThink 1-10 of 10 Results from ReadWriteThink Sort by: Classroom Resources | Grades K – 2 | Student Interactive | Learning About Language ABC Match ABC Match is a game that has students practice letter-recognition fluency while honing their memories.

Be Glad Your Nose is on Your Face On September 8, 1940, Jack Prelutsky was born in Brooklyn, and attended Hunter College in New York City. Although he claims to have hated poetry through most of his childhood, he rediscovered poetry later in life, and has devoted many years since to writing fresh, humorous poetry aimed specifically at kids. “I realized poetry was a means of communication, that it could be as exciting or as boring as that person or that experience.” In 2006, Prelutsky was named the first Children’s Poet Laureate by the Poetry Foundation.

Haiku Starter Grades 3 – 5 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Seasonal Haiku: Writing Poems to Celebrate Any Season After listening to haiku poetry, students use seasonal descriptive words to write their own haiku, following the traditional format. Reading, Writing, Haiku Hiking! Students learn haiku write descriptive poems and share with the class. Grades 7 – 10 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Engineering the Perfect Poem by Using the Vocabulary of STEM Students research engineering careers and create poetry to understand the vocabulary of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Grades 5 – 8 | Lesson Plan | Unit Experiencing Haiku Through Mindfulness, Movement & Music By being present and mindful on nature walks, students write haiku using vivid sensory language; and explore body movement, music and art as visual and kinesthetic representations of their poetry. Grades 5 – 8 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Animate that Haiku!

Learning Resources | Shel Silverstein “My beard grows to my toes, I never wear no clothes, I wraps my hair Around my bare, And down the road I goes.” – “My Beard” Where the Sidewalk Ends “Needles and pins, Needles and pins, Sew me a sail To catch me the wind.” – from “Needles and Pins” Falling Up “Millie McDeevit screamed a scream So loud it made her eyebrows steam.” – from “Screamin’ Millie” Falling Up “I will not play at tug o’ war. I’d rather play at hug o’ war” – from “Hug O’ War” Where the Sidewalk Ends “If you are a dreamer, come in.” – from “Invitation” Where the Sidewalk Ends “Anything can happen, child, ANYTHING can be.” – from “Listen to the Mustn’ts" Where the Sidewalk Ends “Balancing my ABCs Takes from noon to half past three. I don’t have time to grab a T Or even stop to take a P.” – “Alphabalance” Falling Up “Last night I had a crazy dream That I was teachin’ school.

Using poems, quotations and proverbs The activities below are ways for students to enjoy the music of English. Poems Choose short simple poems that are close to students' lives. These poems are not for heavy analysis. They are for saying aloud. Give pairs a poem to read together. Learning things by heart is very much a part of school systems and it gives students a sense of achievement to know a poem in English. Recommended poems and poets to try are:; Michael Rosen, Roger McGough or John Hegley . Quotations from Literature Another popular form of learning by heart and reading aloud are the famous sayings from our own literature or the work of philosophers, historians and politicians. They can spark interest in a theme, a person or a writer They are a good basis for discussion They carry universal messages across cultural boundaries They can be learned and recited for their music and beauty They are a common feature of language studies Proverbs They have the same advantages of quotations from literature. For example:

poets.org | Academy of American Poets

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