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How to make 25 paper Christmas ornaments

How to make 25 paper Christmas ornaments
Here's a roundup of ornaments you can make from paper.Above left: I made with these instructionsAbove right: I made with these instructions (Update: this is now an old post; some of the links no longer work.) More: Printable snowflake 1 Printable snowflake 2 Paper snowflakes stapled together into something 3-D Not 3-D, but nice snowflake cutting templates Origami star Ornament made with circle cut-outsFlower ornament Ball-like star Ball-like... ballFlower ballGeodesic ballMulti-colored balls made this way, but fastened with wireMany-pointed star Mini star-shaped bookletGlitter star ornamentsMoravian stars Recycled paper ornamentCrystal ornament free download plus a gallery of inspiration Huge spiky star Origami Christmas tree 1 Origami Christmas tree 2 Kirigami Christmas tree 3 Happy folding! Related:  Paper craft & origami projects

Recovered The Origami Page This section is intended for the beginner. It introduces all of the major folds in origami and shows how they are done. It also provides a large number of simple models that aim to allow one to practice these folds. Part 1 Paper and arrows Most origami uses a single uncut square of paper, and this website is no exception. On origami diagrams, arrows show you which direction the paper is to be folded in. How to Make a Paper Snowflake Happy Black Friday, everyone! To follow up with Monday’s snowflake mood board, here are the templates and instructions on how to create these simple, yet beautiful, three-dimensional paper snowflakes PRINTING TEMPLATES: Open PDF of small, medium or large snowflake. Print the large template onto 6 pieces of white paper, the medium on 2 and the small on 1 page. CUT & FOLD: Trim off extra paper then on the medium and small cut out the square pieces. FORMING THREE DIMENSIONAL SNOWFLAKE: Open and flatten each triangle back into a square. HANGING & DECORATING: Using a small punch, create a hole in top point so that you can run a string or fishing line through for hanging. Lia Lia is a daily crafter, maker, designer and DIYer.

Tutorials Quilling and other paper crafts (for personal use) The Basics Christmas Additional Ideas (quilling, plus more) 3D paper ball ornaments I love 3D paper things. Love. And when I saw a little picture of what appeared to be paper balls in a CB2 catalog, I thought, "I am going to make those." So the other day while Alex was writing a paper about mysterious things like polymers and flexible films and tactoids, I made a paper ball. Then I proudly announced I had created a tactoid and it was sitting on my desk. He giggled. These are made from 12 slotted flower shapes that fit together to form a sphere. Download the PDF templates here:Large ball (10")– print/cut 12 sheetsMedium ball (5")– print/cut 2 sheetsSmall ball (3")– print/cut 1 sheet Download a Silhouette .studio file here:Small ball (3")– unzip the file; cut 1 sheet. If you want to hang your ornament, you might like to add the string before assembling the ball. Use the slits to join petals together. It might be helpful to think of the first piece as the "north pole," and then add a row of five flowers encircling it.

The Shirt As with all these designs, try to start with a relatively clean, crisp bill. It will make it much easier. All folds should be sharply creased. It helps to go over the fold with a fingernail on a flat, hard surface. Start by folding the bill precisely in half lengthwise. Fold the bill one quarter of the way in from each side lengthwise. Turn the bill over. Turn the bill over again. Fold a little less than one third of the bill lengthwise from the opposite end as shown. Now you will fold inward in the same direction, tucking the previous fold under the "collar" created in step 4. Gently unfold the previous two folds, keeping the creases. (This step is hard to describe, but it is actually fairly easy.) (This is a close-up of what the fold should look like when complete.) (This is what it should look like after both sides are complete.) When you re-tuck the fold you've been working on back under the collar, you're done!

Accordion Fold Bow Today's bow(s) are super simple and can be made any size. If you feel like busting out some sewing skills, you can also make these from fabric (you might want a little interfacing on larger ones to help them keep a crisp shape though)! The best part is that you can alter these to make your accordion bow into a snowflake bow and then every bow is different! To start, select your paper or fabric (to get nice crisp folds in your end product and assure that it will spread nicely once open, I recommend using thinner paper rather than a card stock. Magazine paper or gift wrap would be perfect as it allows your paper to move pretty freely. I always use the ratio of one inch wide for every three inches long when cutting my paper into a strip to be folded. If you want a "perfect" looking bow, you can measure out inch increments on the back of your bow or score fold lines so each fold is the same size. A little Plain Jane for your taste? There you have it!

Temari by Barbara B. Suess, Author of Japanese Temari, Kiku Designs Japanese Arts and Crafts Temari 3D Paper Snowflake Add New Question Does the paper have to be square? wikiHow Contributor Yes, but it's easy to turn a rectangular sheet of paper into a square. Fold one corner over to the opposite side, lining up the edges to form a triangle. Cut off the "leftover" rectangle below the triangle. Unfold the triangle, and you have a square. Ask a Question If this question (or a similar one) is answered twice in this section, please click here to let us know.

Blogs Become a Member for free access to this and other files on the site. See the Membership page for more details. Already a Member? Log in Here Turn the handle on the side of the box and the vertical shaft rotates back and forth. Use this mechanism as the starting point for your own character based designs or as a way of learning first hand how mechanisms work. Look out for the owl model using this mechanism coming soon. Print out the parts onto thin card. Fold up and glue the side tabs on the box to make right angle triangle tube sections. Glue together the two box sides. Fit the base into the box Fold in and glue the four tabs to the inside walls of the box. Assemble the hinged plate as shown. Make up the two crank ends from double thickness card. Glue together the push rod and glue on the two crank ends. Roll round and glue the four paper tubes accurately lining up the edges with the arrows. Thread the second-to-shortest tube into the crank ends. Assemble the two crank pieces Rate this post:

Gift Wrapping Ideas Last night I was wrapping up my gift for the Cold Hands, Warm Hearts gift swap by Much Love, Illy and SandyALaMode, and I realized something. I may be "crafty" but I am sort of awful at wrapping presents. I rip the paper when I'm cutting it. Ok, Martha Stewart is getting a little too advanced for me here. :] This is something I would do. Just GORGEOUS! Don't you want to go wrap up some packages all pretty now? paper flowers | Talk Crafty To Me Why not brighten up your gloomy winter day, by making your own paper flowers. This super simple project takes only about 5 mins and is sure to brighten any room. Add them to twigs or branches for an instant bouquet or simply throw them in a bowl. Originally created by Martha Stewart, Wendy from DoziDesign has whipped up a quick tutorial. Head on over there and start making flowers to your heart’s content. Pictures from Dozi & Jen Elisebeth. related posts

Popup Greeting Cards We've been talking recently about how great free printables are for cheap crafting on the fly. In this guest post, DSC reader Maria Rainier shows us another example with a tutorial for using a printable to make a quick and easy popup Christmas card. Thanks much, Maria! - Rhonda With the holiday shopping season coming up, it’s easy to just take a deep sigh and simply ask, “How much?” No need to spend money on greeting cards this year, though—cheap DIY cards are a great way to save while showing that you care. Project estimate: Paper, on hand or $1Scissors, on handGlue, on hand Total: Free and up First, print out a popup design on the paper. Cut away the sides of the pattern so only the tree and the dotted lines remain. Fold along the vertical dotted line as carefully as you can with the pattern on the outside. Fold over the first tier of branches at the top of the tree along the folded line, back and forth. Take the Christmas tree card and turn it so you’re seeing the dotted lines.

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