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Stephen Wolfram: Computing a theory of everything

Stephen Wolfram: Computing a theory of everything

http://www.ted.com/talks/stephen_wolfram_computing_a_theory_of_everything.html

Related:  Connectivism

Launching Elluminate Live! Start Session Optionally, you can pre-configure your computer and test your audio using one of our Configuration Rooms prior to your session. Please visit our "First time Users" section in the Support Portal to view configuration rooms for Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing. Note: When joining a Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing session for the first time you will see a Security Dialog. 10 Greatest Open Source Software Of 2009 These are full-featured cross-platform softwares, free as in beer and speech. Vivek Gite picks his best open source software of 2009. #1: Inkscape ( Vector Graphics Editor ) Elementary Particle Explorer Welcome to the Elementary Particle Explorer, designed by Garrett Lisi and Troy Gardner. Every known elementary particle is identified by its charges with respect to the electromagnetic, weak, strong, and gravitational forces. Electrons have electric charge -1, up quarks 2/3, down quarks -1/3, and neutrinos 0, with antiparticles having opposite electric charges. In the Standard Model, as you are about to see, these electric charges are a combination of the particles' hypercharge, Y, and weak charge, W. The Elementary Particle Explorer (EPE) allows you to rotate in charge space (by dragging the image), showing the charges of all known particles. Click on them to see how they are allowed to interact, according to charge conservation.

Someone told me that if there are 20 people in a room, there's a 50/50 chance that two of them will have the same birthday. How can that be?" This phenomenon actually has a name -- it is called the birthday paradox, and it turns out it is useful in several different areas (for example, cryptography and hashing algorithms). You can try it yourself -- the next time you are at a gathering of 20 or 30 people, ask everyone for their birth date. It is likely that two people in the group will have the same birthday. It always surprises people! The reason this is so surprising is because we are used to comparing our particular birthdays with others.

Tour Interactive visualization Comments about this visualization Form for posting a new comment Detail of a comment contributed by anonymous user Screenshot showing part of the collection of visualizations on the site Internet Streaming 101: How To Watch Live TV Online Have you ever missed your favorite television show one week and wanted to watch it before the next week’s new episode aired so that you wouldn’t be completely lost (Fans of “24” and “Lost” can certainly relate to this). Have you parked yourself in front of your television to watch a football, basketball, or soccer match only to realize that the game isn’t playing in your market? Have you ever wanted to watch foreign newscasts only to realize that your cable or satellite provider doesn’t provide the coverage you want? Well, you can spend a lot of money and invest in a satellite dish, TiVO, and premium sports and pay-per-view packages. But who has that kind of money to throw around, especially in these difficult times? Luckily for all of us, there are plenty of sites on-line that stream live and on-demand news, sports, and entertainment that we can watch in the comfort of our own homes.

Processing - Please Wait. "An Exceptionally Simple Theory of Everything"[1] is a physics preprint proposing a basis for a unified field theory, very often referred to as "E8 Theory,"[2] which attempts to describe all known fundamental interactions in physics and to stand as a possible theory of everything. The paper was posted to the physics arXiv by Antony Garrett Lisi on November 6, 2007, and was not submitted to a peer-reviewed scientific journal.[3] The title is a pun on the algebra used, the Lie algebra of the largest "simple", "exceptional" Lie group, E8. The theory received accolades from a few physicists[citation needed] amid a flurry of media coverage, but also met with widespread skepticism.[4] Scientific American reported in March 2008 that the theory was being "largely but not entirely ignored" by the mainstream physics community, with a few physicists picking up the work to develop it further.[5] Overview[edit] Non-technical overview[edit]

Deep meaning in Ramanujan's 'simple' pattern - physics-math - 27 January 2011 The first simple formula has been found for calculating how many ways a number can be created by adding together other numbers, solving a puzzle that captivated the legendary mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan. The feat has also led to a greater understanding of a cryptic phrase Ramanujan used to describe sequences of so-called partition numbers. A partition of a number is any combination of integers that adds up to that number. For example, 4 = 3+1 = 2+2 = 2+1+1 = 1+1+1+1, so the partition number of 4 is 5. It sounds simple, yet the partition number of 10 is 42, while 100 has more than 190 million partitions. So a formula for calculating partition numbers was needed.

Stephen Downes: 'Connectivism' and Connective Knowledge On Jan. 17 George Siemens and I will launch the third offering of our online course called 'Connectivism and Connective Knowledge' -- or CCK11. We use the term 'connectivism' to describe a network-based pedagogy. The course itself uses connectivist principles and is therefore an instantiation of the philosophy of teaching and learning we both espouse. If you're interested, you can register here: The course is a MOOC -- a massive open online course.

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