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Recreating 16th and 17th Century Clothing: The Renaissance Tailo

Recreating 16th and 17th Century Clothing: The Renaissance Tailo
Demonstrations>Accessories:Western European>Flat Caps and Tall Hats Once upon a time, a really long time ago, I joined a historical re-enactment society. I constructed a huge number of really bad hats back then but I loved hats so I kept at it. Right then and there I made a two-fold vow. I'm proud to say that, to my knowledge, I've not broken the first part of that vow. Let's start with an easy one - Flat caps, in period, were called bonnets, which is a gender loaded word for us modern folk. Flat caps are easy. According to Arnold's pattern the brim consisted of doughnut shaped pieces (one each of lining, felt interlining, and tufted wool outer shell). Only fragments of the crown of this particular cap remained but Arnold assumes that they were simply larger circles. To make your own flat cap you will need to measure around your or the cap recipient's head for circumference. Diameter=Circumference divided by 3.14. And now for the more difficult one - So there you have it! Happy costuming! Related:  Costume & Cosplay

Victorian mourning etiquette Following Victoria’s example, it became customary for families to go through elaborate rituals to commemorate their dead. This included wearing mourning clothes, having a lavish (and expensive) funeral, curtailing social behavior for a set period of time, and erecting an ornate monument on the grave. Mourning clothes were a family’s outward display of their inner feelings. For deepest mourning clothes were to be black, symbolic of spiritual darkness. Men had it easy – they simply wore their usual dark suits along with black gloves, hatbands and cravats. The length of mourning depended on your relationship to the deceased. Someone had to provide the clothes quickly to mourners. close window

Free Historical Costume Patterns A list of free historical costume patterns including medieval, Elizabethan and Victorian patterns. Free Patterns Menu: Period Clothing Patterns and Cutting DiagramsVictorian and Edwardian era jacket, suit, shirt, skirt, petticoat, and bodice patterns for women, men, and children. Adapting the Elizabethan Lady's wardrobe for lower class useInstructions for adapting the Elizabethan Lady's Wardrobe patterns in .pdf format. Making a Gored Kirtle PatternFlemish gown based roughly on the 1570-1580 loose kirtle described in Janet Arnold's Patterns of Fashion 1560-1620. Want more free historical costume patterns?

The Tudor Costume Page For 1578, the look for most women should approximate that shown on the right, which is taken from the "Wedding at Bermondsey". Most women should wear a smock with a high collar and ruffles (low status) or seperate, starched ruffs (middling to high) at neck and wrists. Over this is worn a long skirt pleated to a waistband, with a contrast coloured bodice over the top. The bodice is front laced, with a point at centre front. It may have details such as stuffed rolls at the shoulder, or tabs at shoulder and/or waist. Discourse over, lets go on to the garments... The shift The first layer is the shift. The sleeves on this shift are just a narrow tube with a neat hem at the end. You'll see lots of shifts on the manor with fuller sleeves gathered onto a cuff. If you're going to be on the manor for more than two or three days you will want two of these. It's amazing how risque it feels posting a picture of me in the Tudor equivalent of bra and knickers! The petticoat The kirtle Finishing touches

Elizabethan Costuming Page We Make History: Where History & The Arts Meet! Free Patterns Menu: Period Clothing Patterns and Cutting Diagrams - The Ladies Treasury of Costume and Fashion Period Clothing Patterns and Cutting Diagrams IMPORTANT: Notes On Using Our Patterns These patterns are reproduced from original period patterns and from cutting diagrams found in English, French and American publications of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Those copied from full-sized patterns were scanned in at 1/2, 1/4 or 1/8 of the original size as indicated on each piece. They can be printed out and enlarged on a photocopier, projector, digitally, or by hand. Patterns copied from cutting diagrams have been scanned in at 1 to 1½ times original size and are not to scale. We also include period cutting layouts and diagrams which are not always to scale. All of these patterns come in one size only: that of the original. We are happy to grant non-commercial private and personal use of the patterns we share with you for free, but permission must be obtained prior to using them for any other purpose. Please click on a title or scroll down the page to view our selection

Sixteenth-Century Clothing - Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clot The sixteenth century was one of the most extravagant and splendid periods in all of costume history and one of the first periods in which modern ideas of fashion influenced what people wore. Some of the larger cultural trends of the time included the rise and spread of books, the expansion of trade and exploration, and the increase in power and wealth of national monarchies, or kingdoms, in France, England, and Spain. Each of these trends influenced what people chose to wear and contributed to the frequent changes in style and the emergence of style trendsetters that are characteristic of modern fashion. Wealth and the monarchies of Europe Perhaps the single biggest factor influencing fashion in the sixteenth century was the wealth of European kingdoms and powerful city-states in Italy. The powerful kings and queens who led European nations believed that one of the ways that they could display their power was through their clothing. Fashion historian Ruth M. The pressure to keep up

Free Patterns Menu: Period Clothing Patterns and Cutting Diagram Period Clothing Patterns and Cutting Diagrams IMPORTANT: Notes On Using Our Patterns These patterns are reproduced from original period patterns and from cutting diagrams found in English, French and American publications of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Those copied from full-sized patterns were scanned in at 1/2, 1/4 or 1/8 of the original size as indicated on each piece. Patterns copied from cutting diagrams have been scanned in at 1 to 1½ times original size and are not to scale. We also include period cutting layouts and diagrams which are not always to scale. All of these patterns come in one size only: that of the original. We are happy to grant non-commercial private and personal use of the patterns we share with you for free, but permission must be obtained prior to using them for any other purpose. Please click on a title or scroll down the page to view our selection

Clothing, Costuming and Textiles - Ravensgard eneral Costuming mbroidery, Textiles and Dyes arp-Weighted Loom ablet Weaving ewelry Making eneral Supplies Return to <A HREF="medieval.html" target="_top">Main Medieval Page</A>, <A HREF="interests.html" target="_top">Medieval Arts and Sciences Page</A>, or <A HREF=".. Fairy Wings Tutorial With Mid-Summers Eve and Fairy Day being only 2 days away the glitter if flowing freely at our home. I ventured out trying to find my girls some fairy wings and ended up with nothing after visiting four different party/costume stores. Soooooo we made our own. I found them simple enough to do although the decorating took a while to finish. List of Supplies Needed: 4 wire coat hangers, Duct Tape, 2 pair of tights or sheer toe nylons. Modge Podge and paintbrush, Glitter, Not pictured but also needed, 1/2 inch wide elastic, Safety Pin Pliers for helping bend the wire. Other items you could consider using are acrylic paints, Flowers and the wire to wrap them, Possible a glue gun if you don’t want to wrap your flowers with wire. Extra embellishments for your wings, jewels, flowers, ribbon, leaves. Straighten all four hangers then twist the ends like shown. Wrap a small piece of duct take around the ends to help hold them securely. Using more duct tape attach a top piece to a bottom piece.

Sapphire & Sage - Renaissance & Medieval Feather Fans Collection By popular request, feather fans are now available! Many fans offered are double-sided, meaning that the ornamental detailing is included on both the front and reverse sides of the fan. The dimensions listed are for the fans at their widest part horizontally, and from the bottom of the wooden handle to the tip of the center feather. To view colors options, click here . "Wilhelmina" Feather Fan The epitome of elegance, this fan will guarantees plenty of "ooh"s and "aah"s! You will choose an ostrich floss feather base color (shown in jet), covered with layers upon layers of colorful peacock eye feathers.Opt for a jewel-less fan style or go for the addition of a jeweled stone in setting for more pizzazz. "Anastasia" Feather Fan An aristocratic asymetrical design that is perfect for faire or Mardi Gras alike! "Cleopatra" Feather Fan Bold and beautiful, this feather fan design is as regal as the pyramids themselves! "Anne" Feather Fan A fan to rival the Queen's! "Juliette" Feather Fan

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