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Recreating 16th and 17th Century Clothing: The Renaissance Tailor

Recreating 16th and 17th Century Clothing: The Renaissance Tailor
Demonstrations>Accessories:Western European>Flat Caps and Tall Hats Once upon a time, a really long time ago, I joined a historical re-enactment society. I constructed a huge number of really bad hats back then but I loved hats so I kept at it. Then, one day, while I was wearing one of my latest tall hat creations (something closer to accurate but still not quite there), a well-meaning but rather tactless long time player bluntly informed me that my hat was so incredibly incorrect that he could not contain himself and had to say something. In public. In a really loud, incredulous voice. Right then and there I made a two-fold vow. I'm proud to say that, to my knowledge, I've not broken the first part of that vow. Let's start with an easy one - Flat caps, in period, were called bonnets, which is a gender loaded word for us modern folk. Flat caps are easy. Only fragments of the crown of this particular cap remained but Arnold assumes that they were simply larger circles. Happy costuming!

http://www.renaissancetailor.com/demos_elizabethanhats.htm

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Free Historical Costume Patterns A list of free historical costume patterns including medieval, Elizabethan and Victorian patterns. Free Patterns Menu: Period Clothing Patterns and Cutting DiagramsVictorian and Edwardian era jacket, suit, shirt, skirt, petticoat, and bodice patterns for women, men, and children. Adapting the Elizabethan Lady's wardrobe for lower class useInstructions for adapting the Elizabethan Lady's Wardrobe patterns in .pdf format. General instructions for an apron, neckcloth, partlet and flat cap. Costuming Through the CenturiesPatterns and instructions on making SCA appropriate clothing including a 800AD Anglo Saxon Tunic, 900AD Viking Apron Dress, 1330AD Cotehardie, 1350AD Sideless Surcoat, 1410AD Houppelande.

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