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Writing Thesauruses v1

Writing Thesauruses v1
Related:  Stuck for a word?mykel

Writing Thesauruses v2 (updated) Feelings and Emotions Vocabulary Word List Advertisement. EnchantedLearning.com is a user-supported site. As a bonus, site members have access to a banner-ad-free version of the site, with print-friendly pages.Click here to learn more. (Already a member? More Word Lists Blog Chuck is the author of the published novels: Blackbirds, Mockingbird, Under the Empyrean Sky, Blue Blazes, Double Dead, Bait Dog, Dinocalypse Now, Beyond Dinocalypse and Gods & Monsters: Unclean Spirits. He also the author of the soon-to-be-published novels: The Cormorant, Blightborn (Heartland Book #2), Heartland Book #3, Dinocalypse Forever, Frack You, and The Hellsblood Bride. Also coming soon is his compilation book of writing advice from this very blog: The Kick-Ass Writer, coming from Writers Digest. He, along with writing partner Lance Weiler, is an alum of the Sundance Film Festival Screenwriter’s Lab (2010). Chuck has contributed over two million words to the game industry, and was the developer of the popular Hunter: The Vigil game line (White Wolf Game Studios / CCP). Much of his writing advice has been collected in various writing- and storytelling-related e-books. He currently lives in the forests of Pennsyltucky with wife, two dogs, and tiny human.

100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Subscribe to Receive our Articles and Exercises via Email You will improve your English in only 5 minutes per day, guaranteed! 21 Responses to “100 Exquisite Adjectives” Rebecca Fantastic list! 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Three Telling Quotes About ‘Very’ Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. ~Mark Twain‘Very’ is the most useless word in the English language and can always come out. If you enjoyed this, you will love: If you want to learn how to write a book, join our Writers Write course in Johannesburg or sign up for our online course. by Amanda Patterson © Amanda Patterson

Believe in Your Story In March, I took a fascinating class with Gwen Hernandez on working with the software program, Scrivener . Scrivener, available from Literature and Latte, is widely touted as a totally wonderful program for writing, and while I had owned it for a while, I knew I needed guidance in fully taking advantage of its many features. The class was great. Hernandez laid out daily information in chunks that were just right to absorb and work with. The homework was easy and helpful. WYSIWYG: What You See Is What You Get Scrivener is not a WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get — pronounced Wizziwig) word processor. But let’s discuss the WYSIWYG question. Creating in WYSIWYG. The Compose Window of Scrivener isolates the writing in its own screen and helps you focus. Creating in Non-WYSIWYG. The relationship between layout and design and content isn’t straightforward. One big advantage of Scrivener is the ability to track metadata, or data about the data. Status. Flexible? Shrunken Manuscript

Eat. Live. Laugh. and sometimes shop!: 50 most beautiful English words. A few weeks ago I ran across a list, which I shared with you, of 33 Ways to Stay Creative. One suggestion was to read a page in the dictionary. That one stuck with me. It made me pause and think: When was the last time I even looked up a word in a real {not online} dictionary? A very long time ago is the answer to that query. I certainly do not fancy myself a wordsmith {an expert in the use of words}, but I am interested by words, especially unused or underused words. Where were the kids you ask? I have no idea. So today I bring you a few of my favorite words. Becoming - attractive. I'm off to gambol around with my children as we enjoy the halcyon days of summer! Cheers!

Verbal Irony: Types Critical Concepts Verbal Irony Verbal irony is a figure of speech. The speaker intends to be understood as meaning something that contrasts with the literal or usual meaning of what he says. The different sorts of discrepancy between the meaning of what is said and what is in fact on the particular occasion meant with it give rise to different kinds of verbal irony: In sarcasm, the two stand in opposition. Example: Mother comes into the TV room and discovers her 11-year-old watching South Park instead of doing his homework, as he was set to a dozen minutes ago. The term comes directly into English from the Greek sarkasmos, which in turn derives from the ugly verb sarkazsein, "to tear the flesh" (used of dogs). Example: "My, you've certainly made a mess of things!" In overstatement, the meaning that ordinarily attaches to what is said is an exaggeration of what the speaker uses it to mean. Well, if he literally died, we should be pretty spooked, because we're face to face with a corpse!

MOODY WRITING 100 Mostly Small But Expressive Interjections David Bier Thanks for this – what a fun post considering there’s no actual narrative in it! Cecily Some of these interjections are quite culturally and age specific, so if people need to be told what they mean, they should probably not be using them.For example, to many Brits, va-va-voom is not old-fashioned at all, but instead is firmly linked to the long-running ads that footballer Thierry Henry made for the Renault Clio. Himanshu Chanda Whoa ! What a biiiig list. And yes this ones really great. You understand exact meaning of those interjections while reading comic strips Michael Huzzah!

Color Words Colour Terms This list contains 168 definitions of obscure colour terms using combinations of 'normal' colours of the rainbow and descriptive adjectives; e.g. cardinal = deep scarlet red; russet = reddish brown. Note that most English speakers outside the U.S. spell colour with the added British 'u' rather than the American version color. Don't worry if the colours (or colors) in your universe don't match up with the definitions I've given for these words, though - I've been known to have skewed perceptions of reality ... I hope you have found this site to be useful.

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