background preloader

The Illustrated Guide to Epigenetics

The Illustrated Guide to Epigenetics
Illustrations by Joe Kloc This month marks the ten-year anniversary of the sequencing of the human genome, that noble achievement underpinning the less noble sales of 23andMe's direct-to-consumer genetic tests. To commemorate the scientific occasion, we've created an illustrated introduction to one subfield of genetics likely to produce even more dubious novelty science projects someday: epigenetics. What is epigenetics? Human life begins as a single cell equipped with all of the genetic information—known as the genome—it will need to develop into a full-grown adult. Through a process of repeated cell division, this cell eventually multiplies into tens of trillions of cells, each containing a complete copy of the genome. FIGURE 1: Through a process called mitosis, a single cell (A) splits into two cells (B) with identical genetic information. FIGURE 2: DNA coils around proteins called histones, forming a nucleosome. How does the epigenome work?

http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2011/02/illustrated-guide-epigenetics

Related:  Genetics 1APBIOteaching

The Ductile Helix: "Jumping Genes" May Influence Brain Activity Mobile DNA molecules that jump from one location in the genome to another may contribute to neurological diseases and could have subtle influences on normal brain function and behavior, according to a study published October 30 in Nature. (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group.) Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements that use a copy-and-paste mechanism to insert extra copies of themselves throughout the genome. 49 Fascinating YouTube Videos to Learn About the Human Body As any doctor, nurse practitioner or other health care professional knows, the body is an interesting system. In many ways, it’s like a machine, with many complex parts. There is a lot to learn about the body and how it works, as well as how its different systems interact to create a larger system. Here are 49 interesting YouTube videos that can help you learn about the human body: Brain

Open Educational Resources Project (Collections Strand) - OeRBITAL UK Centre for Bioscience OER project - Phase 2 The UK Centre for Bioscience sucessfully bid for funding to undertake a 'Collections Strand' Open Educational Resources project over 2010-2011 following its success with the phase 1 (OER pilot projects) Interactive Laboratory and Fieldwork Manual for the Biosciences project. Working with ten discipline consultants from across the country we have produced a wiki for the benefit of the bioscience community to explore the potential of OERs across a range of disciplines. The intention is to guide staff new to Open Educational Resources in the Biosciences towards those which we believe are valuable examples, and the routes to find them. The OeRBITAL project wiki is available at:

Genetics and the tree of life We traditionally think about the tree of life in terms of Kingdoms: plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, etc. Genetics has really revolutionized the way we think about the tree of life and, because our classifications should reflect ancestry (that is, who is more closely related to whom), it has actually called into question a lot of our traditional classifications. Most biologists split up life into three domains: Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya (the last of which includes animals, plants, fungi, etc.).

Repair DNA and Cells using Nanotech Home > Press > Nanobotmodels Company offer vision of future DNA and cell-repair techniques Abstract: Five decades of research and practical application of computers in biomedicine has given rise to the discipline of medical informatics, which has made many advances in genomic and translational medicine possible. Ukraine | Posted on March 15th, 2010 Epigenetics Epigenetics PBS air date: July 24, 2007 CHEERFUL NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON: Did you ever notice that if you get to know two identical twins, they might look alike, but they're always subtly different? CANTANKEROUS NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON: Yep, whatever. CHEERFUL NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON: As they get older, those differences can get more pronounced. Two people start out the same but their appearance and their health can diverge.

NOVA Common House Dust Could Contain Cancer-Causing Molecules For scientists, dust is a goldmine of information about the chemicals we encounter every day. From NOVA Next | Jan 9, 2017 CRISPR and Stem Cells Could Speed Studies of Rare Diseases Push, don't pull your eLearners - removing barriers to learning In the context of eLearning, to me, this is a 'no-brainer' and I find it alarming, disappointing, and depressing, how often people don't get it. I think the same holds true in eLearning. If barriers to using eLearning tools are put up then educators and students won't use the tools, and this sets up a feedback loop. First, educators don't use the tools because they are too difficult or poorly designed, that is, the tools actually make it harder to teach, and the students won't use the system as the educators are not populating it with the information they need. When it comes to eLearning, and getting students and staff involved, I like to apply the KISS principle (Keep It Simple Stupid!).

Understanding Genetics: Human Health and the Genome Try your luck at DNA Roulette. Watch out, you might even learn something...Learn More See whether online genetic tests are right for youLearn More When Will Broccoli Taste Like Chocolate? Learn about our book! Scientists Create an Organism with a New Genetic Code For the first time, scientists have fundamentally changed the genetic code of an organism, raising the possibility that researchers might be able to retool nature and create potent new forms of proteins to combat disease. Scientists from Yale and Harvard have recoded the entire genome of an organism and improved a bacterium’s ability to resist viruses, a dramatic demonstration of the potential of rewriting an organism’s genetic code. “This is the first time the genetic code has been fundamentally changed,” said Farren Isaacs, assistant professor of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology at Yale and co-senior author of the research published October 18 in the journal Science. “Creating an organism with a new genetic code has allowed us to expand the scope of biological function in a number of powerful ways.” In this case, the researchers changed fundamental rules of biology. Other participating researchers from Yale University are Hans Aerni and Adrian Haimovich.

DNA Extraction from Wheat Germ DNA Extraction from Wheat Germ Objective · To observe the physical and chemical properties of DNA · Understand one process of DNA extraction · Demonstrate proficiency with one technique of DNA extraction · Use research to make a drawing of DNA with labeled parts

Related: