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Do Cell Phones Belong in the Classroom?

Do Cell Phones Belong in the Classroom?
Mobile devices are ubiquitous in American high schools, and their use is harder to regulate than old-fashioned note passing. But here's why teachers should be paying closer attention. Two U.S. high school students compete in the LG Mobile Worldcup Texting Championship. According to a Pew study, American teenage girls send an average of 100 messages a day. (Reuters) If you were to drop in on most any American high school these days, what would you see? Most schools allow students to have cell phones for safety -- a reaction to the Littleton, Colorado, high school shooting incident of 1999. At a time when middle-class homes are filled with computers and mobile devices, schools are grappling with the question of how much technology to bring into the classroom. But whatever a school's approach to technology, cell phones seem to be nearly ubiquitous. In some cases, schools have actually embraced cell phones and incorporated them into their teaching. So what's the solution?

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2012/05/do-cell-phones-belong-in-the-classroom/257325/

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Cell Phones at School: The Debate of Legitimacy <<< Christian School Solutions Articles On at least one school issue, many parents find themselves agreeing with their children rather than their teachers: that is the permissible use of cell phones at school. Many parents and students vigorously support the legitimacy of allowing cell phones in the classroom, but most teachers still oppose the practice. Lift the Cell Phone Ban Cell phones could become the next big learning tool in the classroom. So why have schools been so slow to embrace them? Without a doubt, cell phones can cause serious disruption in the classroom. From urgent text messages flying across the room to lessons interrupted by rap-song ringtones, these gadgets are responsible for nationwide frustration among educators. And, in extreme cases, students have used their cell phones to cheat on tests and harass other students, even during class time.

How Concerned Should We Be about Cell Phones in Class? As faculty, it seems we are very concerned about cell phones in the classroom. Articles about the problem are popping up everywhere in the pedagogical literature, and they often are the “most-read” and “most-commented” articles listed on various websites. Is student use of electronic devices that pressing of a pedagogical problem? I’ve been wondering if our focus on it isn’t becoming excessive.

Cell Phones in the Classroom: What’s Your Policy? April 15, 2013 By: Sydney Fulbright, PhD in Effective Classroom Management Are we old fuddy-duddies when we ask (demand) students to put away their cell phones in the classroom or clinical areas? Using Smartphones in the Classroom By Edward Graham Found in: Advice and Support Ken Halla knows a thing or two about using technology in the classroom. For the past 5 years, the 22-year teaching veteran has worked to transition his ninth-grade World History and AP Government classrooms into a mobile device-friendly environment where students can incorporate the latest technology into the learning process.

Cellphones in school: a teaching tool or distraction? After 20 years of teaching, Miriam Morgenstern is calling it quits this month. The Lowell High School history and ESL teacher is starting an educational nonprofit, although that’s not the only reason she’s leaving the classroom. Another is her frustration with students and their cellphones. Learn2luvcell: A Powerful Multipurpose Mechanism for Learning Query most secondary school teachers on the subject of cell phones, and you're likely to get an impassioned rant about the device's insidious ability to provoke distraction in the classroom. All that giggly sub rosa texting not only robs students of attentiveness, they say, but also presents an inveterate disciplinary problem. It's why most school districts have strict cell phone policies, and most teachers are grateful for it. But some forward-looking educators have begun to push the subversive idea that the high tech wizardry of mobile phones can be a powerful multipurpose mechanism for learning. Podcasts, video interviews, polling, quizzes, even homework assignments, can all be accomplished via cell phone to enhance students' learning experience, while the phone can also act as a versatile electronic aid to the teacher.

30 Futuristic Phones We Wish Were Real Mobile phone business is one of the most rapid growing industries. Not so long ago, the popular check phone was Nokia 3310 with mere basic functions: call, text messaging and the only bearable game, snake. However, significant improvement has been made since then. We now have so many variety of phones that surpasses the basic function, smart phones for example allows you to connect to social media conveniently, GPS, video conferencing etc. What will be next? What we can expect from the next generation of handsets that will be available in the next 10 year?

Surviving your group project Now that you have created your project task list, it’s time to decide how you’ll get all of the work done. You’ll need to determine in what order the tasks need to be done, when the tasks need to be completed, and who is responsible for each task. You can use backward planning to guide these decisions. Begin with the day the assignment is due. Work backwards to determine the order of the tasks, as well as the deadline and the person responsible for each one.

Citation: Robert, Earl (2012). Do cell phones belong in the classroom. Retrieved from by estherpepin Mar 9

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