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Ska

Ska
Etymology[edit] There are different theories about the origins of the word ska. Ernest Ranglin claimed that the term was coined by musicians to refer to the "skat! skat! skat!" scratching guitar strum.[8] Ranglin described the difference between R&B and ska beats is that the former goes "chink-ka" and the latter goes "ka-chink".[9] Another explanation is that at a recording session in 1959 produced by Coxsone Dodd, double bassist Cluett Johnson instructed guitarist Ranglin to "play like ska, ska, ska", although Ranglin has denied this, stating "Clue couldn't tell me what to play!" History[edit] Byron Lee & the Dragonaires performed ska with Prince Buster, Eric "Monty" Morris, and Jimmy Cliff at the 1964 New York World's Fair. 2 Tone[edit] Third wave [edit] Third wave ska originated in the 1980s and became commercially successful in the 1990s. United States[edit] United Kingdom[edit] Germany, Australia, Japan and South America[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ska

Related:  Youth subculture in Jamaika, UK and continental Europe 60's-80's

Punk rock Punk rock (or simply punk) is a rock music genre that developed between 1974 and 1976 in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in garage rock and other forms of what is now known as protopunk music, punk rock bands eschewed perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. Punk bands typically use short or fast-paced songs, with hard-edged melodies and singing styles, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk embraces a DIY ethic; many bands self-produced recordings and distributed them through informal channels. Characteristics Philosophy

Reel Big Fish History[edit] Early success (1992-1999)[edit] Reel Big Fish released a demo in 1992 which is now called "In The Good Old Days". With the departure of Ben Guzman, then backup vocalist Aaron Barrett took his place as lead singer. Rocksteady Rocksteady is a music genre that originated in Jamaica around 1966.[1] A successor to ska and a precursor to reggae, rocksteady was performed by Jamaican vocal harmony groups such as The Gaylads, The Maytals, The Heptones and The Paragons. The term rocksteady comes from a dance style that was mentioned in the Alton Ellis song "Rock Steady". Dances performed to rocksteady were less energetic than the earlier ska dances. The first international rocksteady hit was "Hold Me Tight" (1968) by the American soul singer Johnny Nash; it reached number one in Canada.[2] Characteristics[edit]

Neo soul Neo soul is a term coined by music industry entrepreneur Kedar Massenburg during the late 1990s to market and describe a style of music that emerged from soul and contemporary R&B.[1] Heavily based in soul music, neo soul is distinguished by a less conventional sound than its contemporary R&B counterpart,[1][2] with incorporated elements ranging from jazz, funk, and hip hop to pop, fusion, and African music. It has been noted by music writers for its traditional R&B influences, conscious-driven lyrics, and strong female presence. Etymology[edit] "By definition, neo-soul is a paradox. Neo means new. Soul is timeless.

Oi! Oi! is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s.[1] The music and its associated subculture had the goal of bringing together punks, skinheads and other working-class youth. [2][3] History[edit] The prevalent ideology of the original Oi! movement was a rough brand of working-class rebellion. Lyrical topics included unemployment, workers' rights, harassment by police and other authorities, and oppression by the government.[4] Oi!

The Mighty Mighty Bosstones The Mighty Mighty Bosstones (informally referred to as The Bosstones) are an American ska-core band from Boston, Massachusetts, formed in 1983.[1][2][3] Since the band's inception, lead vocalist Dicky Barrett, bassist Joe Gittleman, tenor saxophonist Tim "Johnny Vegas" Burton and dancer ("Bosstone") Ben Carr have remained constant members. The line-up also includes drummer Joe Sirois, saxophonist Kevin Lenear, guitarist Lawrence Katz and trombonist Chris Rhodes. The Bosstones are often credited as one of the progenitors of the genre of ska punk and the creators of its sub-genre ska-core, a form of music which mixes elements of ska with punk rock and hardcore.

Reggae Reggae is a music genre that originated in Jamaica in the late 1960s. While sometimes used in a broad sense to refer to most types of popular Jamaican dance music, the term reggae more properly denotes a particular music style that was strongly influenced by traditional mento and calypso music, as well as American jazz and rhythm and blues, and evolved out of the earlier genres ska and rocksteady. Stylistically, reggae incorporates some of the musical elements of rhythm and blues, jazz, mento, calypso, African, and Latin American music, as well as other genres.

Leela James Leela James (born June 2, 1983 in Los Angeles, California)[1][2] is an American R&B and soul singer-songwriter. James cites singers James Brown, Roberta Flack, Marvin Gaye, Donny Hathaway, Gladys Knight, Mavis Staples, and Stevie Wonder as her influences. Her deep, rich, gritty vocals have drawn comparisons to Aretha Franklin, Chaka Khan, and Tina Turner.[1]

History of the punk subculture The history of the punk subculture involves the history of punk rock, ideology, fashion, visual art, literature, dance, and film. Since emerging in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia in the mid-1970s, the punk subculture has spread around the globe and evolved into a number of different forms. The history of punk plays important part in the history of subcultures in the 20th century. Two UK punks in the 1980s Antecedents and influences[edit]

Sublime (band) Eric Wilson and Bud Gaugh were childhood friends, having grown up in the same Long Beach neighborhood. Eric's father Billy Wilson taught Gaugh how to read music and play the drums. Gaugh and Wilson together with future Sublime manager Michael Happoldt formed a three-piece punk band called The Juice Bros during their high school years. About this time, Bradley Nowell, who had recently dropped out of University of California, Santa Cruz, joined the band. Nowell helped introduce Gaugh and Wilson to reggae and ska, who at the time listened exclusively to punk rock.[6]

Reggae Bob Marley and the Wailers, 1980 Reggae is a kind of music from Jamaica. Most music from Jamaica can be called reggae. It started in the late 1960s. Anthony Hamilton (musician) Hamilton was first introduced to mainstream audiences with his singing of the chorus of Nappy Roots 2002 single "Po' Folks" which earned a Grammy Award nomination for "Best Rap/Sung Collaboration" in 2003.[3] "Po' Folks" is the second single from the multi-platinum Watermelon, Chicken & Gritz album.[4] Hamilton followed up with three collaborations on Nappy Roots next Atlantic Records release Wooden Leather with "Sick & Tired", "Push On", "Organic" and then one feature on The Humdinger on the single "Down N' Out".[5][6] Nappy Roots and Anthony Hamilton also have a song together called "Bluegrass Stain'd" with Mark Ronson that was released through Elektra Records. Hamilton was featured on Jadakiss' 2004 hit "Why" (which was also nominated for "Best Rap/Song Collaboration", in 2005) and two of 2Pac's remixed songs. Hamilton also contributed to 2002's "Thugz Mansion" (7" remix) and 2006's "Dear Mama" (Frank Nitty Remix).

The Clash The Clash's politicised lyrics, musical experimentation, promotion of DIY ethics and rebellious attitude had a far-reaching influence on rock, alternative rock in particular.[2] They became widely referred to as "The Only Band That Matters", originally a promotional slogan introduced by the group's record label, CBS. In January 2003, the band—including original drummer Terry Chimes—were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked the Clash number 28 on their list of the 100 greatest artists of all time.[3] Nu metal Nu metal (also known as nü-metal[1] or aggro-metal[2][3]) is a subgenre of heavy metal which combines metal music[2][4][5] with genres such as hip hop and grunge.[2][6][7] It is classed as part of alternative metal.[2] Predecessors[edit] Characteristics[edit] Bands associated with nu metal have derived influence from a variety of diverse styles, including electronic music, funk, glam metal, gothic rock, hardcore punk, hip hop, New Wave music, industrial metal, jazz, post-punk, symphonic rock and synthpop.[2][4][6][21][22] Nu metal also derives influences from multiple sub-genres of heavy metal including rap metal, funk metal, alternative metal and thrash metal.[2][4][6] Nu metal is also sometimes noted for participation of women in the genre in contrast to some other metal genres,[26] including bands such as Coal Chamber,[27] Otep[28] and the all-female band Kittie.[29] History[edit]

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