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Ska

Ska
Etymology[edit] There are different theories about the origins of the word ska. Ernest Ranglin claimed that the term was coined by musicians to refer to the "skat! History[edit] Byron Lee & the Dragonaires performed ska with Prince Buster, Eric "Monty" Morris, and Jimmy Cliff at the 1964 New York World's Fair. 2 Tone[edit] Third wave [edit] Third wave ska originated in the 1980s and became commercially successful in the 1990s. United States[edit] The mid-1990s saw a considerable rise in ska music's underground popularity, marked by the formation of many ska-based record labels, booking organizations and indie zines. By the late 1990s, mainstream interest in third wave ska bands waned as other music genres gained momentum.[35] Moon Ska Records folded in 2000, but Moon Ska Europe, a licensed affiliate based in Europe, continued operating in the 2000s and was later relaunched as Moon Ska World. United Kingdom[edit] Germany, Australia, Japan and South America[edit] Related:  Youth subculture in Jamaika, UK and continental Europe 60's-80's

Punk rock Punk rock (or simply punk) is a rock music genre that developed between 1974 and 1976 in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in garage rock and other forms of what is now known as protopunk music, punk rock bands eschewed perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. Punk bands typically use short or fast-paced songs, with hard-edged melodies and singing styles, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Characteristics Philosophy Technical accessibility and a DIY spirit are prized in punk rock. The issue of authenticity is important in the punk subculture—the pejorative term "poseur" is applied to those who associate with punk and adopt its stylistic attributes but are deemed not to share or understand the underlying values and philosophy. Musical and lyrical elements Johnny Rotten and Steve Jones of the Sex Pistols Visual and other elements British punks, circa 1986 Pre-history Garage rock and British Beat Protopunk Etymology Australia Oi!

2 Tone 2 Tone (or Two Tone) is a music genre created in England in the late 1970s by fusing elements of ska, punk rock, rocksteady, reggae and new wave. Within the history of ska, 2 Tone is classified as its second wave, and is the precursor of the third wave ska scene of the 1980s and 1990s.[1] History[edit] The term was coined by The Specials' keyboard player Jerry Dammers, who — with the assistance of Horace Panter and graphic designer John "Teflon" Sims — created the iconic Walt Jabsco logo (a man in a black suit, white shirt, black tie, pork pie hat, white socks and black loafers) to represent the 2 Tone genre. The logo was based on an early album cover photo of Peter Tosh, and included an added black-and-white check pattern.[3][4][5] Most of the bands considered to be part of the 2 Tone genre were signed to 2 Tone Records at some point. Museum[edit] Gallery[edit] Coventry Music Wall of Fame inductees, December 2011 Further reading[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Oi! Oi! is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s.[1] The music and its associated subculture had the goal of bringing together punks, skinheads and other working-class youth. [2][3] History[edit] The prevalent ideology of the original Oi! The white power skinhead movement had developed its own music genre called Rock Against Communism (RAC), which had musical and aesthetic similarities to Oi! played an important symbolic role in the politicization of the skinhead subculture. Garry Bushell, a music journalist who promoted the Oi! The mainstream media increased its claims that Oi! In the aftermath of that riot, many Oi! See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] oioimusic.com Weekly updated site with interviews and reviewsEurope Punk - Music for social change, not profit.Oi!

Rocksteady Rocksteady is a music genre that originated in Jamaica around 1966.[1] A successor to ska and a precursor to reggae, rocksteady was performed by Jamaican vocal harmony groups such as The Gaylads, The Maytals, The Heptones and The Paragons. The term rocksteady comes from a dance style that was mentioned in the Alton Ellis song "Rock Steady". Dances performed to rocksteady were less energetic than the earlier ska dances. The first international rocksteady hit was "Hold Me Tight" (1968) by the American soul singer Johnny Nash; it reached number one in Canada.[2] Characteristics[edit] Rocksteady uses some of the musical elements of rhythm and blues (R&B), jazz, ska, African and Latin American drumming, and other genres. The fact that chording instruments (instruments that play chords) in ska, rocksteady, and reggae often play so infrequently in the bar and play repeated rhythmic patterns led Jamaican musicians to explore simple modal chord progressions such as I - VII or I - IV. Lyrics[edit]

Reel Big Fish - I Dare You To Break My Heart History of the punk subculture The history of the punk subculture involves the history of punk rock, ideology, fashion, visual art, literature, dance, and film. Since emerging in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia in the mid-1970s, the punk subculture has spread around the globe and evolved into a number of different forms. The history of punk plays important part in the history of subcultures in the 20th century. Two UK punks in the 1980s Antecedents and influences[edit] Several precursors to the punk subculture had varying degrees of influence on that culture. Art and philosophy[edit] A number of philosophical and artistic movements were influences on and precursors to the punk movement. A Sex Pistols poster Literature and film[edit] Various writers, books, and literary movements were important to the formation of the punk subculture. Music[edit] Punk rock has a variety of origins. Earlier subcultures[edit] Origins[edit] Patti Smith in 1978 New York City[edit] London[edit]

Ska punk History[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ "Ska Revival". Allmusic. The Clash The Clash's politicised lyrics, musical experimentation, promotion of DIY ethics and rebellious attitude had a far-reaching influence on rock, alternative rock in particular.[2] They became widely referred to as "The Only Band That Matters", originally a promotional slogan introduced by the group's record label, CBS. In January 2003, the band—including original drummer Terry Chimes—were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked the Clash number 28 on their list of the 100 greatest artists of all time.[3] History[edit] Origins: 1974–76[edit] The act was still searching for a lead singer. "so I went out in the crowd which was fairly sparse. On 30 May, Rhodes and Levene met surreptitiously with Strummer after a 101'ers gig. Early gigs and the growing scene: 1976[edit] With Rhodes insisting that the band not perform live again until they were much tighter, the Clash rehearsed intensely over the following month. Punk outbreak and UK fame: 1977–79[edit]

Reggae Reggae is a music genre that originated in Jamaica in the late 1960s. While sometimes used in a broad sense to refer to most types of popular Jamaican dance music, the term reggae more properly denotes a particular music style that was strongly influenced by traditional mento and calypso music, as well as American jazz and rhythm and blues, and evolved out of the earlier genres ska and rocksteady. Stylistically, reggae incorporates some of the musical elements of rhythm and blues, jazz, mento, calypso, African, and Latin American music, as well as other genres. One of the most easily recognizable elements is offbeat rhythms; staccato chords played by a guitar or piano (or both) on the offbeats of the measure. Reggae has spread to many countries across the world, often incorporating local instruments and fusing with other genres. Etymology[edit] We didn't like the name rock steady, so I tried a different version of 'Fat Man'. There's a word we used to use in Jamaica called 'streggae'.

Neo soul Neo soul is a term coined by music industry entrepreneur Kedar Massenburg during the late 1990s to market and describe a style of music that emerged from soul and contemporary R&B.[1] Heavily based in soul music, neo soul is distinguished by a less conventional sound than its contemporary R&B counterpart,[1][2] with incorporated elements ranging from jazz, funk, and hip hop to pop, fusion, and African music. It has been noted by music writers for its traditional R&B influences, conscious-driven lyrics, and strong female presence. Etymology[edit] "By definition, neo-soul is a paradox. In a 2010 article for PopMatters, music writer Tyler Lewis elaborated on the term in retrospect, stating: "The term 'neo-soul' has been the subject of intense debate ever since Kedar Massenburg coined it as a way to market Erykah Badu's Baduizm 13 years ago. Characteristics[edit] History[edit] 1980s–early 1990s: Origins[edit] Mid–late 1990s: Mainstream breakthrough[edit] 2000s: Apex and mainstream decline[edit]

Sex Pistols The Sex Pistols were an English punk rock band that formed in London in 1975. They were responsible for initiating the punk movement in the United Kingdom and inspiring many later punk and alternative rock musicians. Although their original career lasted just two-and-a-half years and produced only four singles and one studio album, Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols, they are regarded as one of the most influential acts in the history of popular music.[1][2] In January 1978, at the end of a turbulent tour of the United States, Rotten left the Sex Pistols and announced its break-up. History[edit] Origins and early days[edit] The group had been rehearsing regularly, overseen by McLaren's friend Bernard Rhodes, and had performed publicly for the first time. John Lydon joins the band[edit] Early Seventies Britain was a very depressing place. Nick Kent—a writer for the New Musical Express (NME)—used to jam occasionally with the band, but left upon Lydon's recruitment.

Big D and the Kids Table Skinhead Eventually, political affiliations grew in significance for the skinhead subculture, and now the political spectrum within the subculture spans from far right to far left, although many skinheads describe themselves as apolitical. Contemporary skinhead fashions range from clean-cut 1960s mod-influenced styles to less-strict punk- and hardcore-influenced styles.[2] History[edit] Mods of lesser means made do with practical clothing styles that suited their lifestyle and employment circumstances: work boots or army boots, straight-leg jeans or Sta-Prest trousers, button-down shirts, and braces (called suspenders in North America). In addition to retaining many mod influences, early skinheads were very interested in Jamaican rude boy styles and culture, especially the music: ska, rocksteady, and early reggae (before the tempo slowed down and lyrics became focused on topics like black nationalism and the Rastafari movement).[1][10][11] Style[edit] A current day skinhead. Female skinheads. [edit]

Reggae Bob Marley and the Wailers, 1980 Reggae is a kind of music from Jamaica. Most music from Jamaica can be called reggae. It started in the late 1960s. The music has regular chops on the back beat (off-beat). Reggae music is often used by Rastafarian groups. Famous instruments in reggae music are drums, guitar, saxophone, trumpet and trombone. Reggae was started in 1960 but became famous in the 1970s. Reggae songs often have lots of backing singers. Rapper Snoop Dogg released an album of reggae music in 2013.[1] Reggae is related to ska.

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