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MIT Creates Amazing UI From Levitating Orbs

MIT Creates Amazing UI From Levitating Orbs
Anyone else see The Avengers? Just like in Iron Man 1 and 2, Tony Stark has the coolest interactive 3-D displays. He can pull a digital wire frame out of a set of blueprints or wrap an exoskeleton around his arm. Those moments aren’t just sci-fi fun; they’re full of visionary ideas to explore and manipulate objects in 3-D space. Except for one thing: How would Stark feel all of these objects to move them around? Jinha Lee, from the Tangible Media Group of the MIT Media Lab, in collaboration with Rehmi Post and Hiroshi Ishii, has been playing with the idea of manipulating real floating objects in 3-D space to create a truly tactile user interface. It’s essentially a small field in which gravity doesn’t overcome an object. “There is something fundamental behind motivations to liberate physical matter from gravity and enable control. Interviewing Lee, I realized he’s one-part scientist, one-part philosopher. As of now, the concept has been proven, and Lee is already focusing on scale. Related:  Creativity and Innovation

Google Drive vs Google+ Photos vs Picasa Web | shahidhussain.com After the launch of Google Drive, I was excited to use it as a photo backup & sharing service. Unfortunately, the features for what I consider a good photo viewer are spread out over different Google products (Drive, Google+ photos, Picasa Web.) I want to back up my photos online This is easiest in Drive – drop your photos into the Drive folder, and you’re done. You can’t do it on Google+. Yes, you can upload photos (including the neat Instant Upload function from your phone) but it won’t be an archive, because photos over 2048 pixels get resized from the original. You can’t do it easily on Picasa Web. Let me qualify that last statement. I want to be able to view them online and on mobile in a decent interface All three products have different photo viewers. Google+ photos Picasa Google Drive Google+ has the best viewer – there’s a grid of photos on the web and the Google+ mobile app, and a useful fan / zoom animation. I want to be able to share photos easily Google Drive sharing Google+ sharing

Creators - Dedicated to inspiring designers, inventors & the creative spirit in all of us. August 22, 2013 Artist’s Work Paints a Beautiful Picture Animations Tyrus Wong, a 102-year-old artist’s work influenced the visual direction of Bambi in 1941. An exhibition at the Walt Disney Family Museum in San Francisco will be held to celebrate Wong’s work. According to the Disney Museum site, the drawings felt different from what is commonly known for Disney animation and this is what caught Walt Disney’s eye. Copyright Davison 2013 Sources: August 20, 2013 Hope “Floats” for those with Carpal Tunnel Product Innovation This levitating wireless computer mouse was invented by Vadim Kibardin of Kibardin Design, in order to help prevent and treat the contemporary disease, carpal tunnel syndrome. The levitating mouse consists of a mouse pad base and a floating mouse with a magnet ring. Source: August 15, 2013 Pin It

Is this the future of Project Glass? – Cell Phones & Mobile Device Technology News & Updates Wearable technology, and computing equipment that acts more like another limb then a gadget, has gotten a lot of attention recently thanks to Google . Project Glass made a big splash not too long ago at Google’s annual developer conference when they showed several users falling on to the Moscone West in San Francisco. Google’s pretty bent on showing us the sharing possibilities with Project Glass, but it feels like in time that technology could become a ubiquitous part of our lives. Fortunately for those of us who lack a hyperactive imagination, a short film popped up recently that can help fill in the blanks. I love the world that was created in this film, and how it was all made possible by wearable tech. Instead of a television, there’s just an empty wall that the contact lenses fill in with whatever you want to watch. I reached the end of the short film and, despite the frightening turn the technology took, would gladly sign up to have that tech.

How Do You Create A Culture Of Innovation? This is the third part in a series by Scott Anthony, author of The Little Black Book Of Innovation. It sounds so seductive: a “culture of innovation.” The three words immediately conjure up images of innovation savants like 3M, Pixar, Apple, and Google--the sorts of places where innovation isn’t an unnatural act, but part of the very fabric of a company. While culture is a complicated cocktail, four ingredients propel an organization forward: the right people, appropriate rewards and incentives, a common language, and leadership role-modeling. The Innovator’s DNA Has Four Components If you ask most people what makes a great innovator, the most common response is innate gifts from parents or a higher power. At the core is what the professors call “associational thinking.” Questioning: Asking probing questions that impose or remove constraints. Most organizations have people who follow these behaviors--even if they aren’t immediately obvious to senior leadership. Then it dawned on me.

Researchers Glean Deep UI Lessons From A Haptic Steering Wheel We’re not supposed to text while driving. That makes sense--it diverts your eyes and mental attention elsewhere. But what about your average turn-by-turn GPS screen? It’s sort of the same idea, no? So especially for seniors on the road, how do we design effective tools to not only get from point A to point B, but to get them there more safely? Professor SeungJun Kim from Carnegie Mellon’s Human Computer Interaction Institute is playing with new ideas to improve the driving performance of the elderly. (The wheel is of particular note: It was built in a partnership of AT&T. I’ve had a chance to read through the paper, and the findings are fascinating. What he found can probably be applied to products and UIs of all types: 1. Plus, this gem from the article is particularly fun: 71% of elder drivers thought the auditory modality was the most useful and 59% thought the visual modality was the most annoying. It would be interesting if Kim ran this same study 30 years from now. [Hat tip: Core77]

Chameleon - A Better Home Screen for your Android Tablet by Gabor Vida - Teknision While this campaign has been very successful due to everyone's support, due to unforseen problems with our Amazon Payments account we cannot accept any new pledges and all existing pledges will be cancelled. We have spoken with Kickstarter, who have told us the best way to resolve the situation is to close the current project, and create a new Chameleon backing page, where you can re-pledge to receive your Chameleon App. We are grateful for all your support and have upgraded all rewards $5 and above with 5 Bonus Chameleon backgrounds. People who have existing credit card authorizations from this project will be cancelled when this project is closed - and thus no charges will be applied to your credit card. We appreciate your patience, we are very excited to deliver world class software to everyone! We are aiming to have the Kickstarter page live early next week, we will be sure to share it with everyone. Looking for a better Home Screen for your Android Tablet? Device Type Android Tablet

dentsu: paint sound sculptures oct 06, 2010 dentsu: paint sound sculptures the creative studio dentsu, teamed up with photographer linden gledhill to create this series of paint sculptures using sound vibrations. the series was part of a campaign for canon’s pixma ink printer brand. the photographs and videos begin by wrapping a membrane around a small speaker. ink drops were placed on this membrane and the speaker was turned on. once it began to vibrate the ink begins to jump up and down. high-speed video cameras and still cameras were used to capture this including circling around the sculptures to see them from all angles. experimenting with different sounds and frequencies created the various pieces. nate archer I designboom Robotic Quintet Composes And Plays Its Own Music Sound Machines 2.0 is Festo's latest effort to create robotic musicians. The German engineering firm Festo has developed a self-playing robotic string quintet that will listen to a piece of music and generate new musical compositions in various musical styles effortlessly. Dubbed Sound Machines 2.0, the acoustic ensemble is made up of two violins, a viola, a cello, and a double bass, each consisting of a single string that is modulated by an electric actuator for pitch, a pneumatic cylinder that acts as a hammer to vibrate the string, and a 40 watt speaker. A new composition is generated in a two-stage process. Here’s an example of what the robots can produce: Festo is better known for projects from its Bionic Learning Network, which include amazing animal-inspired robots, such as SmartBird, the elephant trunk-inspired Bionic Handling Assistant and Robotino, AirPenguin and AquaPenguin, AirJelly and AquaJelly, AquaRay and Airacuda (these are just too cool not to mention). [Media: Festo]

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