background preloader

Sass vs. LESS

Sass vs. LESS
"Which CSS preprocessor language should I choose?" is a hot topic lately. I've been asked in person several times and an online debate has been popping up every few days it seems. It's nice that the conversation has largely turned from whether or not preprocessing is a good idea to which one language is best. Let's do this thing. Really short answer: Sass Slightly longer answer: Sass is better on a whole bunch of different fronts, but if you are already happy in LESS, that's cool, at least you are doing yourself a favor by preprocessing. Much longer answer: Read on. The Much Longer Answer The Learning Curve with Ruby and Command Line and Whatever The only learning curve is the syntax. Winner: Nobody Helping with CSS3 With either language, you can write your own mixins to help with vendor prefixes. In Sass, you can use Compass, and Compass will keep itself updated, and thus the prefix situation is handled for you. In LESS, there are also some mixin libraries battling to be the best. See that?

http://css-tricks.com/sass-vs-less/

Related:  HTML / CSS / JS

Can’t Get Into Preprocessors? Try Zen Coding A ton of discussion lately has been given to preprocessors. These incredibly useful tools make coding easier, faster and more maintainable, but they’re certainly not for everyone. Whether or not you’ve jumped on the preprocessor bandwagon, you should give a fresh look to an old favorite that helps you dramatically cut your coding time without reinventing your workflow with compilers and other complications: Zen Coding. With Zen Coding, you can type a little and output a lot, just like with a preprocessor like Jade or Haml, only it expands instantly into the vanilla HTML that you love. For those that are new to the concept, I’ll walk you through how Zen Coding works and show you some of my favorite tricks, then end with a brief tutorial on getting Zen Coding up and running in Sublime Text 2. Zen Coding vs.

An introduction to meta viewport and @viewport By Andreas Bovens Introduction Support for the viewport meta tag in Opera’s mobile products has been around for quite some time, and from Opera Mobile 11 onward, we have made our viewport implementation more robust, added support for new mechanisms to deal with different screen densities, and included an implementation of our own CSS @viewport rule proposal.

Initializr: With Great Templates Comes Great Responsivity! Today I’m proud to announce that a “Responsive template” is now available on Initializr! It will help you dealing with all the various devices used to display your site. Mobiles, tablets, netbooks, laptops, desktop monitors, HUGE desktop monitors… Making your site work correctly on all these devices is a real nightmare. Well guess what? This nightmare is… absolutely not over! A Look at HTML5 Canvas Interactivity The HTML5 canvas element allows for developers to implement interactivity and drawing which was previously undoable without the use of a third party program such as flash. In this article we’re going to be tackling the problem of interactivity, and how to accomplish it using HTML5′s canvas tag. You could expand upon this information to make a basic HTML5 game. Games were something which until quite recently couldn’t be accomplished with just HTML and Javascript. With the canvas tag it’s become much more realistic to create a game or some sort of interactive idea with HTML5 rather than Flash which was what was traditionally considered to be the only practical way. To begin, lets take a look at keyboard input in canvas.

Sass Basics Before you can use Sass, you need to set it up on your project. If you want to just browse here, go ahead, but we recommend you go install Sass first. Go here if you want to learn how to get everything setup. How to create sliding feedback form using jQuery In this tutorial we are going to learn how to create fancy looking feedback form which slides from the right/left side of your web page. I am sure there are many plugins available for CMS like Joomla, WordPress but it’s always a good idea to code something of your own. Certainly, you require this code when you are developing everything at your own and not using any kind of CMS. So let’s see how it actually works! Watch Live Demo | Download Source Code

CSS: centering things See also the index of all tips. Centering lines of text The most common and (therefore) easiest type of centering is that of lines of text in a paragraph or in a heading. CSS has the property 'text-align' for that: Javascript expressions and operators - MDN reference This chapter documents all the JavaScript language operators, expressions and keywords. Expressions and operators by category For an alphabetical listing see the sidebar on the left. Primary expressions Basic keywords and general expressions in JavaScript.

Extreme programming Planning and feedback loops in extreme programming. Extreme programming (XP) is a software development methodology which is intended to improve software quality and responsiveness to changing customer requirements. As a type of agile software development,[1][2][3] it advocates frequent "releases" in short development cycles, which is intended to improve productivity and introduce checkpoints at which new customer requirements can be adopted. Critics have noted several potential drawbacks,[5] including problems with unstable requirements, no documented compromises of user conflicts, and a lack of an overall design specification or document. Quick Tip: CSS 100% Height I don’t know about you, but I always get frustrated trying to figure out how to get my layout to stretch vertically to 100% of the page. I have a div that I want to stretch, but it just doesn’t stretch. Now why wouldn’t it do that? Today I will share the solution with you.

New research shows smartphone growth is global Last October, we launched Our Mobile Planet, a resource enabling anyone to visualize the ways smartphones are transforming how people connect with information, each other and the places around them. Today, we're releasing new 2012 research data, and the findings are clear—smartphone adoption has gone global. Today, Australia, U.K., Sweden, Norway, Saudi Arabia and UAE each have more than 50 percent of their population on smartphones. An additional seven countries—U.S., New Zealand, Denmark, Ireland, Netherlands, Spain and Switzerland—now have greater than 40 percent smartphone penetration.

Related:  SASS/LESS