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Hemp - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - (Build 20100401064631)

Hemp - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - (Build 20100401064631)
Other variants of the herb Cannabis sativa are widely used as a drug, commonly known as marijuana. These variants are typically low growing and have higher content of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The legality of Cannabis varies widely from country to country, and from state to state in the United States. Uses[edit] Hemp grown for milk animal fodder In modern times hemp is used for industrial purposes including paper, textiles, clothing, biodegradable plastics, construction (as with Hempcrete and insulation), body products, health food and bio-fuel. Food[edit] Hemp seeds Hemp seeds can be eaten raw, ground into a meal, sprouted, made into hemp milk (akin to soy milk), prepared as tea,[5] and used in baking. Market share[edit] Within the UK, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has treated hemp as purely a non-food crop. Nutrition[edit] Japanese hemp seed seasoningSwiss hemp beer uses blossoms Storage[edit] Fiber[edit] Hemp stem showing fibers. Building material[edit] Related:  wikipedia 2

Maize - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - (Build 20100401064631 Maize (/ˈmeɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), known in some English-speaking countries as corn, is a large grain plant domesticated by indigenous peoples in Mesoamerica in prehistoric times. The leafy stalk produces ears which contain the grain, which are seeds called kernels. Maize kernels are often used in cooking as a starch. History A maize heap at the harvest site, India Most historians believe corn was domesticated in the Tehuacan Valley of Mexico.[1] The Olmec and Mayans cultivated it in numerous varieties throughout Mesoamerica, cooked, ground or processed through nixtamalization. Maize is the most widely grown grain crop throughout the Americas,[3] with 332 million metric tons grown annually in the United States alone. Words for maize Many small male flowers make up the male inflorescence, called the tassel. In places outside North America, Australia, and New Zealand, corn often refers to maize in culinary contexts. Structure and physiology

Tchotchke Tchotchke (/ˈtʃɒtʃkə/ CHOCH-ka)[1][2][3][4][5] is a small bauble or miscellaneous item. Depending on context, the term has a connotation of worthlessness or disposability as well as tackiness,[6][7] and has long been used by Jewish-Americans and in the regional speech of New York City and elsewhere. The word may also refer to free promotional items dispensed at trade shows, conventions, and similar large events. Also, stores that sell cheap souvenirs in tourist areas like Times Square, Venice Beach, and Waikiki Beach in Hawaii are sometimes called "tchotchke shops". Leo Rosten, author of The Joys of Yiddish, gives an alternate sense of tchotchke as meaning a desirable young girl, a "pretty young thing". In some friend circles, the word Tchotchke, often shortened to "tchotch," may be used as a term of endearment given from one friend to another. Etymology and spelling[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] Tchotchke etymology on WorldWideWords.org

Author: ET council seeded Homo sapiens as intelligent beings with 12-strand DNA Adam's Calendar - 280,000 year-old site of Annunaki intervention in human society, including DNA degradation (Michael Tellinger) by Alfred Lambremont Webre, JD, MEd In an exclusive interview of author Patricia Cori by Alfred Lambremont Webre released May 4, 2011, Ms. Cori states that a consortium of advanced intelligent upper-dimensional extraterrestrial and inter-dimensional civilizations originally developed Homo sapiens as an intelligent being with12-strand DNA, and a species that was to have been a guardian of the 3rd dimension of time-space in our dimensional ecology on Earth. View ExopoliticsTV interview with author Patricia Cori on Homo sapiens as ET consortium creation Readers can view the exclusive ExopoliticsTV interview with Patricia Cori in the video embedded in the article above or at the URL below. ET development of Homo sapiens twelve-stranded DNA Human Genome Project: Genetic code of ET life forms in human DNA Ms. According to Ms. According to Ms.

Panicum virgatum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - (Build 201 Panicum virgatum, commonly known as switchgrass, is a perennial warm season bunchgrass native to North America, where it occurs naturally from 55°N latitude in Canada southwards into the United States and Mexico. Switchgrass is one of the dominant species of the central North American tallgrass prairie and can be found in remnant prairies, in native grass pastures, and naturalized along roadsides. It is used primarily for soil conservation, forage production, game cover, as an ornamental grass, and more recently as a biomass crop for ethanol and butanol, in phytoremediation projects, fiber, electricity, and heat production and for biosequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Other common names for switchgrass include tall panic grass, Wobsqua grass, blackbent, tall prairiegrass, wild redtop, thatchgrass, and Virginia switchgrass. Description[edit] Habitat[edit] Distribution[edit] Switchgrass is a versatile and adaptable plant. Establishment and management[edit] Uses[edit] Bioenergy[edit]

Alchemy The Emerald Tablet, a key text of Western Alchemy, in a 17th-century edition Alchemy is an influential philosophical tradition whose practitioners have, from antiquity, claimed it to be the precursor to profound powers. The defining objectives of alchemy are varied, but historically have typically included one or more of the following goals: the creation of the fabled philosopher's stone; the ability to transform base metals into the noble metals (gold or silver); and development of an elixir of life, which would confer youth and longevity. Overview[edit] Alchemy is the art of liberating parts of the Cosmos from temporal existence and achieving perfection which, for metals is gold, and for man, longevity, then immortality and, finally, redemption. Modern discussions of alchemy are generally split into an examination of its exoteric practical applications and its esoteric aspects. Relation to the science of chemistry[edit] Scientific apparatus in the alchemist's workshop, 1580 Q.

The 48 Laws of Power Background[edit] Greene initially formulated some of the ideas in The 48 Laws of Power while working as a writer in Hollywood and concluding that today's power elite shared similar traits with powerful figures throughout history.[5] In 1995, Greene worked as a writer at Fabrica, an art and media school, and met a book packager named Joost Elffers.[4][8] Greene pitched a book about power to Elffers and six months later, Elffers requested that Greene write a treatment.[4] Although Greene was unhappy in his current job, he was comfortable and saw the time needed to write a proper book proposal as too risky.[10] However, at the time Greene was rereading his favorite biography about Julius Caesar and took inspiration from Caesar's decision to cross the Rubicon River and fight Pompey, thus inciting the Great Roman Civil War.[10] Greene would follow Caesar's example and write the treatment, which later became The 48 Laws of Power.[10] He would note this as the turning point of his life.[10]

Populus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - (Build 201004010646 Populus is a genus of 25–35 species of deciduous flowering plants in the family Salicaceae, native to most of the Northern Hemisphere. English names variously applied to different species include poplar /ˈpɒp.lər/, aspen, and cottonwood. Description[edit] The genus has a large genetic diversity, and can grow from anywhere between 15–50 m (49–164 ft) tall, with trunks of up to 2.5 m (8 ft 2 in) diameter. Male catkins of Populus × canadensis Ecology[edit] Poplars of the cottonwood section are often wetlands or riparian trees. Poplars and aspens are important food plants for the larvae of a large number of Lepidoptera species - see List of Lepidoptera that feed on poplars. Classification[edit] Group of four poplars on a hill through the seasons, April, September, October, February (Germany) Selected species[edit] Populus section Populus – aspens and White Poplar. Populus section Tacamahaca – balsam poplars. Cultivation[edit] A fastigiate Black Poplar cultivar of the Plantierensis Group, in Hungary

File:Hartjesdag.jpg Amazing! Scientists: Our DNA is Mutating As We Speak! We Are Developing 12 Strands! A microscopic image of human chromosomes. Little Alfie Clamp has an 'extra arm' on one of his, in what is believed to be a world first.His condition left Alfie unable to see until he was three months old and his muscles were so weak he could not roll over on his own. He still suffers serious digestive problems and needs a cocktail of drugs every day to help his body absorb vital nutrients. He also suffers fits which sparked by high temperatures and metabolic problems stop him from eating or drinking. Since he was born, Alfie has been rushed to hospital six times - including twice just last month - when he stopped breathing. His parents even believed he was dying twice and were stunned when Alfie made a full recovery after spending time in hospital. Mr Clamp said: 'The doctors told us there is nothing we could have done to prevent it. II. by Patricia Resch The content has been removed at the request of Patricia Resch. III. Occasional diarrhoea. Dizziness Ringing in the ears IV. Inner peace.

Miscanthus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - (Build 201004010 Miscanthus is a genus of about 15 species of perennial grasses native to subtropical and tropical regions of Africa and southern Asia, with one species (M. sinensis) extending north into temperate eastern Asia. Selected species Uses[edit] M. giganteus[edit] The rapid growth, low mineral content, and high biomass yield of Miscanthus make it a favorite choice as a biofuel.[3] Miscanthus can be used as input for ethanol production, often outperforming corn and other alternatives in terms of biomass and gallons of ethanol produced. M. sinensis[edit] Winter miscanthus, an ornamental grass, growing in Southern Ontario, Canada M. sinensis is cultivated as an ornamental plant. References[edit] External links[edit] UK's National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and MaterialsMiscanthus x giganteus - as an energy crop - Miscanthus Research at the University of Illinois[1] - New Energy Farms - Miscanthus developers and suppliers

File:Diadème de limpératrice Eugénie (musée du Louvre) (7166066743).jpg Project Avalon

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