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Fruit & Veg planner

Fruit & Veg planner

Adventures in Field Botany / Illustrated-Glossary Leaf Morphology: Phyllode/ Cladode: modifyed stems that act as leaves. Ensiform: leaves sharp edges, taper into a slender point (fern) Stellate: hairs come up like fingers. Looks like cluster of hair. Peltate: "petiole joins to the center" in leaves. Glossary of Terms: WHORLED - more than two (2) opposite leaves. OPPOSITE - leaf nodes are on opposite sides of twig. ALTERNATE - leaf nodes alternate in pattern along branch. DECUSSATE - Arranged on a stem in opposite pairs at right angles to those above or below, resulting in vertical rows of leaves. PALMATE - consisting of leaflets or lobes radiating from the base of the leaf. CAPSULE - a hollow dry fruit with 3+ locules (chambers) Dehiscent = splits open to release the seed. Indehiscent: remaining closed, do not split open at maturity. Capsule Types- Dehiscent: Capsule breaks to release fruit Indehiscent: This is a drupe, no hard capsule that is made to split open A walnut is a drupe fruit. OVATE (ovoid) OBOVATE (obovoid) ELLIPTICAL Root Index

How To Battle Pests And Insects Naturally With Hot Pepper and Garlic Spray (Recipes Included) | The Farm - Old World Garden Farms It’s the question we get more than any other this time of year : “What can I use in the garden to naturally control insects like beetles, aphids, and more?” If you’re like us, the last thing you want to do is to start spraying all types of chemicals and concoctions onto the very food you are trying to grow in order to eat healthier. The good news is you don’t have to. In many cases – with proper crop rotation and watering techniques – you can keep pest problems to a minimum without ever spraying a single drop of anything on them other than water. (See Our 4 Part Series On Garden Set-up And Maintenance) But as we all know too well – sometimes that just isn’t enough…and when your plants begin to show significant damage from marauding pests – there are ways to control them safely with natural ingredient remedies. Don’t Jump The Gun – Before You Do Anything – Make Sure You Actually Need To Spray… Remember that there are just as many good insects (if not more) than bad at work in your garden.

Companion Planting Chart, Map and Guide | Companion Gardening Map & Chart Companion planting means putting plants together in the garden that like each other, or help each other out. Companion planting can have a real impact on the health and yield of your plants. Organic gardeners strive to achieve a balance in their gardens so that they don't require chemicals for pest or disease control. Companion planting can play a significant role in assisting with pest control. Some combinations work because of scents they use to repel insects, others work because they attract good bugs. When planning your garden, take some time to think about the layout of your garden to incorporate some of the companion planting ideas. Companion Planting Garden Map Types of Companion Planting There are a number of systems and ideas using companion planting. Another system using companion planting is the forest garden, where companion plants are intermingled to create an actual ecosystem, emulating the interaction of up to seven levels of plants in a forest or woodland.

10 Natural Remedies For The Most Common Complaints Herbs have been used for centuries by many cultures to help alleviate common complaints, but nowadays we are much quicker to rush to the medicine cabinet than our herb gardens. It’s time to go back to basics and see how much nature can heal you, naturally! You can learn about all of these remedies in video form below! Rosemary Coughing? Mint Upset Stomach? Oregano Menstrual Cramps? Curry Powder Achy joints? Dill Upset G.I. Parsley Bloated? Cayenne Congested? Basil Feeling Down? Cilantro/Corriander Feeling Tired? Ginger Having Nausea? There you have it, nature’s medicine cabinet. Stay healthy! SOURCES: (1) (2) Free 10 Day Screening: Oct 20th - 30th! The Sacred Science follows eight people from around the world, with varying physical and psychological illnesses, as they embark on a one-month healing journey into the heart of the Amazon jungle. Check out the film for FREE!

Natural Pools or Swimming Ponds Natural Pools or Natural Swimming Ponds (NSPs) Let nature clean the water... Chemical-free water garden and swimming pool. The plant portion, or regeneration zone, is separated from the swimming area by the wall seen a few inches below the water’s surface. www.naturalswimmingpools.com The pools have skimmers and pumps that circulate the water through the regeneration zone and back into the swimming area. The aquatic plants filter out contaminants and use nutrients from the water as food which helps prevent algae. There are many options as to design. A gradual slope contains the plants, gravel and loamy sand, a wall keeps them separate from the swimming area. Vacuum but twice a year and tend to the plants as needed. The regeneration zone can be along the perimeter of a natural pool or a pond unto itself but connected to the swimming area. www.gartenart.co.uk Plants steel the nutrients away from algae. www.gartenart.co.uk Half regeneration area, half swimming pool. www.living-pool.eu Builders:

How To: Turn Logs into a Natural Raised Garden Bed! » Curbly | DIY Design Community So... let's say you just finished up an epic weekend of tree pruning and yard clearing, or just happen to have a pile of sticks and logs hanging around. If you're a resourceful Curblier, you know there's something to be done with all that yard waste besides tossing it or turning it into a giant bonfire. But what? We have the answer below! After clearing his yard for a garden makeover, Instructables user "Jamieicecream" had two dilemmas: 1) What to do with all that yard waste? and 2) How to build a raised garden bed with no money? Jamie offers an in-depth walk through of the whole process, start to finish, over on Instructables so head over there to see how it's done. Tagged : Inspiration, thrift, garden, outdoor, repurpose, recycling, Reuse, branch, logs, tree, wood, stump, How-To, natural, rustic, Affordable, budget-friendly, DIY

How to Build Your Own Terrarium Do you have a green thumb but an extremely limited living space? How about building your own DIY terrarium? All you need is a clear glass or plastic container, a few of your favorite plants and some cheap gardening supplies to start your own self-contained and self-sustained miniature garden. The best part about making your own terrarium is that the sky is the limit for how it can look. You can grow plants in old pickle jars, fish bowls, apothecary jars, antique vases and more. You can make your plant arrangements minimalist or organically cluttered, and use as many or as little ornaments as you wish. Click on image to enlarge.

How to Turn a Pallet into a Garden Good news and bad news. I had planned to film a short video showing you how to make a pallet garden, but the weather didn’t cooperate. I was stapling the landscape fabric onto the pallet when it started drizzling and got really windy. So keep reading my pallet loving friends, instructions on how to make your own pallet garden are just a few lines away… Find a Pallet The first thing you need to do is–obviously–find a pallet. Don’t just take the first pallet you find. Collect Your Supplies For this project, you’ll need the pallet you found, 2 large bags of potting soil, 16 six packs of annual flowers (one six pack per opening on the face of the pallet, and two six packs per opening on the top of the completed pallet garden), a small roll of landscape fabric, a staple gun, staples, and sand paper. Get Your Pallet into Shape Once you’ve dragged your pallet home, give it a once over. Let the Stapling Begin! Lay the pallet face down. Now for the sides. Now for the Fun Part–Planting!

Planting A Pineapple Did y’all know that you can take this and turn it into… This? And that this will eventually produce… This? Yes, I’m talking about turning your average, ordinary grocery store pineapple into a tropical showpiece within your home. A plant that is not only impressive but will WOW! Planting a Pineapple 1. 2. 3. In 24 months (sounds better than two years) it will look like this. You will have an actual, large, utterly delicious pineapple in 24-36 months. The thought of growing my own pineapple always makes me smile and giggle just a little bit. Now what am I supposed to do with all of this leftover pineapple? I see something sweet coming soon. While you’re waiting for me to make something yummy with the leftovers, go ahead and plant a pineapple. Be adventurous plant a pineapple. Hugs, Tickled Red *Please bear in mind that I am not a hortoculturist. Tagged as: Gardening, Pineapple, Tropical Fruit

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