background preloader

Digital Storytelling Kit - Thank you!

Digital Storytelling Kit - Thank you!
The resources in this kit will help you implement the exciting process of digital storytelling with your students. Right- or ctrl-click to download each file below or download a single PDF on the right. Articles Sample Digital Stories Bookmark this page to use to set expectations for student work. Lesson Plans If you have any questions, please let us know. —The Tech4Learning Team

http://www.tech4learning.com/frames/dskit-thank-you

Related:  Digital storytellingDST resourcesDigital Storytelling

English Language Learners and the Power of Personal Stories We’ve asked Larry Ferlazzo, a prolific blogger and Twitter user who has written a recent book called “English Language Learners: Teaching Strategies That Work,” to do a guest post for us today. More than five million children in the United States enter school each year speaking a language other than English. That amount is expected to grow to 25% by the year 2025. It’s not surprising, then, that we hear from readers regularly that the more we can offer for this group, the better.

DigitalStorytelling4Kids [licensed for non-commercial use only] / Sandbox Welcome to the Sandbox The Sandbox area is where you can test several of the digital storytelling tools we didn't cover in the sessions. First, visit the suggested tools and choose one or a few to play with. Then add your creation to the Posterous page by sending an email to digitalstorytellingEVO2013@posterous.com with your creation. Don't forget to tag and add a Title to your Posterous post ((tag: sandbox)). You can add a Title and tags by including these in the Subject Line of your email.

9 Web 2.0 Sites to Publish Student Work Written by Mark Brumley Publish and Share Student Work Publishing educational technology enhanced content online, in eye-catching formats, is easier than ever. And, students love to publish their projects online and share with their family and friends. Use these easy-to-use web 2.0 sites to publish, share and celebrate student work. Two Publishing Categories

The Future Of Storytelling Is About To Get Wild Guest author Kim Gaskins is the director of content development and lead writer for Latitude, an international research consultancy. Many of us go about our lives constantly surrounded by screens, immersed in various "stories": movies, TV shows, books, plot-driven video games, news articles, advertising, and more. Whether we realize it or not, we're creating new behaviors, routines, mindsets, and expectations around what we watch, read or play—which in turn presents new challenges and opportunities for creators and marketers. In other words, while the fundamentals of good storytelling remain the same, technology is changing how stories can be told. But what does that mean exactly?

Digital storytelling: A tutorial in 10 easy steps “Thankful,” a digital story by Sarah Schmidt. How to create a polished, powerful digital story for yourself or your nonprofit Target audience: Nonprofits, social change organizations, educators, foundations, individuals. StoryKeepers - iPad StoryTelling APPS StoryTelling continues to gain popularity as an educational experience creating MORE "sticking power" for concepts a la brain science as well as developing essential communication skills for a media-rich world vying for attention. StoryTelling stimulates deep thinking, creativity and basic literacies; it also enhances and enriches the learning experience for student voices.Storytelling is an art form that uses a story ARC regardless of digital tools used while modernizing the traditional oral storytelling. It is so much more than "tell about" or "explain something" - it NOT a fact-based unfolding with a beginning, middle and end!

The Art Of Storytelling » Tell A Story Get inspired by featured artwork from the Delaware Art Museum and write a story through the interactive Tell a Story activity. Look through the images below for a brief introduction on how this activity works, or click on the link below to begin telling your story. Launch the Tell a Story Activity How Digital Technology "Broke" Narrative and What it Means for Our Students I must confess that I don't read nearly as many books as I used to BC (Before Computers) and BK (Before Kids), but I have been stealing precious moments to savor the ideas and perspectives in Present Shock, the new book by Douglas Rushkoff. Rushkoff is a media theorist who writes about society and our ongoing relationship with technology. (He has also guest blogged for Edutopia). In Present Shock – a play on Alvin Toffler's Future Shock -- he turns his lens to the human experience in a world that's always on, always connected, always in the now, now, now. The result is contemplative guidebook for making sense of and responding more intelligently to the new world where digital technology and big data are overwhelming us, breaking down our cultural narratives, changing our relationship to time, and tricking our internal biological mechanisms into thinking that unreal things are real.

Kurt Vonnegut on the Shapes of Stories and Good News vs. Bad News “The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” This season has been ripe with Kurt Vonnegut releases, from the highly anticipated collection of his letters to his first and last works introduced by his daughter, shedding new light on the beloved author both as a complex character and a masterful storyteller. All the recent excitement reminded me of an old favorite, in which Vonnegut maps out the shapes of stories, with equal parts irreverence and perceptive insight, along the “G-I axis” of Good Fortune and Ill Fortune and the “B-E axis” of Beginning and Entropy. The below footage is an excerpt from a longer talk, the transcript of which was published in its entirety in Vonnegut’s almost-memoir A Man Without a Country (public library) under a section titled “Here is a lesson in creative writing,” featuring Vonnegut’s hand-drawn diagrams.

Visual storytelling: 14 tools for journalists Credit: Image by TapiF on Flickr. Some rights reserved Over the past year here at Journalism.co.uk we have reported on a number of new tools and platforms which have been launched or updated, which offer journalists different ways of telling stories visually.

Related: