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Australian Geographic – the best images and stories about Australia - Journal, Society, Outdoor magazine, Education - geography, photography, wildlife, adventure and science - Australian Geographic

Australian Geographic – the best images and stories about Australia - Journal, Society, Outdoor magazine, Education - geography, photography, wildlife, adventure and science - Australian Geographic
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Dental activities for students: Quizzes & lesson graphics - Tooth identification | Dental, oral and facial anatomy. Animated-Teeth.com offers a number of quizzes (with pre-test study pages) that teachers and instructors can use as part of a classroom activity or online lesson aimed at educating students about dental health topics. Subjects include tooth identification and dental, oral and facial anatomy. The skill level required for each activity varies widely. Some of our most basic quizzes are designed for young children who are first learning about teeth, dentistry and the dentist's office (don't forget that February is Children's Dental Health Month). Other quizzes, such as those that involve anatomy lessons, require a much higher skill level to complete. I) Dental quizzes / Lesson graphics - arranged by subject. A) The dental office / At-home dental care. 1) The Dentist's Office Quiz. - Basic level. A quiz that teaches a child about the tools and equipment found in a dentist's office. 2) The Dental Check-Up Quiz. - Basic level. 3) The Cavity Prevention Quiz. - Basic level. D) Dental and tooth anatomy.

Cyclone Yasi Category five Cyclone Yasi crossed the far north Queensland coast near Mission Beach, between Cairns and Townsville, in the early hours of the morning on February 3, 2011, bringing peak wind gusts estimated at 285 kilometres per hour. Gallery: Cyclone Yasi The massive storm destroyed homes, shredded crops and smashed marinas and island resorts as it roared ashore. Because it was such a large, strong storm, Yasi maintained considerable intensity as it tracked inland into the state's north-west, finally weakening to a tropical low near Mount Isa more than 20 hours after it crossed the coast. While the towns of Cardwell, Tully, Mission Beach, Innisfail and many surrounding townships were badly damaged, the far north's major cities, Cairns and Townsville, escaped relatively unscathed. Although Yasi was one of the most powerful cyclones to have affected Queenslanders since records commenced, only one cyclone-related death was recorded. Key facts Key links Preparations Further reading: Damage Response

Coral sea paradise faces ruin from mining Tropical delight ... children enjoy the beauty of the reef in front of their village on Raja Ampat. ONE of Australia's richest men, Clive Palmer, is buying nickel laterite ore for his Yabulu refinery from an Indonesian company that is defying a ban and mining in Raja Ampat, the world's most ecologically diverse marine environment. An investigation by the Herald has discovered that as well as threatening the environment that is home to 75 per cent of the world's coral species, the supplier undercompensates landowners, has allegedly paid bribes for its licences and created deep rifts in the traditional communities of Raja Ampat. Conservationists and activists have fought hard to have Raja Ampat, in West Papua province, protected but the mine on the island of Manuran where Queensland Nickel gets its nickel, PT Anugerah Surya Pratama, remains open. And its sister company continues to work at another disputed concession on the island of Kawe, despite a court order to desist. Advertisement

Web 2.0 Science Tools By Laura Turner The following web2.0 sites would be useful for science educators at the high school and middle school level. Some would also be appropriate for higher elementary grade levels. Web 2.0 can also be described as the second round of new technology development and adoption. EcoKids This award-winning EcoKids web site is an interactive environmental web site for children, their families, and educators in Canada and around the world. Experience Math and Science with Gizmos (3-12) www.explorelearning.com This site features 450 interactive simulations for math and science. Exploratorium www.exploratorium.edu This site was one of the first science museums to build a site on the World Wide Web. Google Google SketchUp Create, modify, and share 3-d models! Explore with Google Google Earth for Educators St. Cosmic Zoom. (5-12) Celestia

Photojournal: NASA's Image Access Home Page UK Safari - A site for anyone interested in the wildlife of Britain BBC ON THIS DAY | 26 | 2004: Thousands die in Asian tsunami 2004: Thousands die in Asian tsunami Massive sea surges triggered by an earthquake under the Indian Ocean have killed over 10,000 people in southern Asia, with many more feared dead. An 8.9 magnitude earthquake under the sea near Aceh, north Indonesia, at 0759 local time (0059 GMT) generated the biggest tsunami the world has seen for at least 40 years. The wall of water fanned out across the Indian Ocean at high speed and slammed into coastal areas with little or no warning. Officials in Indonesia, Sri Lanka and India have all reported death tolls in the thousands and the figures are expected to rise sharply over the next few days. Indonesia is thought to be the worst-hit country in the region, with 4,185 confirmed dead. In Sri Lanka, over 3,500 people have died and one million more have been made homeless. Hundreds of fisherman are missing off the southern Indian coast and witnesses have reported scores of bodies being washed up on beaches.

Australian Exceptionalism | Pollytics “Australian Exceptionalism”…. let that phrase roll off your tongue. Now stop laughing for a moment if you can! There’s something about that phrase that just doesn’t sit right with us. We’re not only unaccustomed to thinking about ourselves that way, but for many it’s a concept that is one part distasteful to three parts utterly ridiculous – try mentioning it in polite company sometime. Bring a helmet. We’ll often laugh at the cognitive dissonance displayed by our American cousins when they start banging on about American Exceptionalism – waxing lyrical about the assumed ascendancy of their national exploits while they’re forced to take out a second mortgage to pay for a run of the mill medical procedure. But in truth, we both share that common ignorance – we share a common state of denial about the hard realities of our own accomplishments compared to those of the rest of the world. So let us take a hard look at our economic reality. And for direct comparison: Getting the picture?

Beyond 2012: Why the World Didn't End Beyond 2012: Why the World Didn't End If you're reading this story, it means the world didn't end on Dec. 21, 2012. Despite reports of an ancient Maya prophecy, a mysterious planet on a collision course with Earth, or a reverse in Earth's rotation, we're still here. The Mayan connection "was a misconception from the very beginning," says Dr. John Carlson, director of the Center for Archaeoastronomy. Video: Why The World Didn't End Yesterday For years leading up to the supposed apocalypse, NASA scientists worked to dispel the myths and answer questions on a host of 2012 topics: Question (Q): Are there any threats to the Earth in 2012? Answer (A):The world will not end in 2012. Q: What is the origin of the prediction that the world will end in 2012? A: The story started with claims that Nibiru, a supposed planet discovered by the Sumerians, is headed toward Earth. Q: Does the Mayan calendar end in December 2012? Video: NASA Scientist David Morrison Debunks the Myths A: Absolutely not.

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