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Australian Geographic – the best images and stories about Australia - Journal, Society, Outdoor magazine, Education - geography, photography, wildlife, adventure and science - Australian Geographic

Australian Geographic – the best images and stories about Australia - Journal, Society, Outdoor magazine, Education - geography, photography, wildlife, adventure and science - Australian Geographic

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/

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Dental activities for students: Quizzes & lesson graphics - Tooth identification Animated-Teeth.com offers a number of quizzes (with pre-test study pages) that teachers and instructors can use as part of a classroom activity or online lesson aimed at educating students about dental health topics. Subjects include tooth identification and dental, oral and facial anatomy. The skill level required for each activity varies widely. Some of our most basic quizzes are designed for young children who are first learning about teeth, dentistry and the dentist's office (don't forget that February is Children's Dental Health Month).

Cyclone Yasi Category five Cyclone Yasi crossed the far north Queensland coast near Mission Beach, between Cairns and Townsville, in the early hours of the morning on February 3, 2011, bringing peak wind gusts estimated at 285 kilometres per hour. Gallery: Cyclone Yasi The massive storm destroyed homes, shredded crops and smashed marinas and island resorts as it roared ashore. Because it was such a large, strong storm, Yasi maintained considerable intensity as it tracked inland into the state's north-west, finally weakening to a tropical low near Mount Isa more than 20 hours after it crossed the coast. While the towns of Cardwell, Tully, Mission Beach, Innisfail and many surrounding townships were badly damaged, the far north's major cities, Cairns and Townsville, escaped relatively unscathed. Although Yasi was one of the most powerful cyclones to have affected Queenslanders since records commenced, only one cyclone-related death was recorded.

Coral sea paradise faces ruin from mining Tropical delight ... children enjoy the beauty of the reef in front of their village on Raja Ampat. ONE of Australia's richest men, Clive Palmer, is buying nickel laterite ore for his Yabulu refinery from an Indonesian company that is defying a ban and mining in Raja Ampat, the world's most ecologically diverse marine environment. An investigation by the Herald has discovered that as well as threatening the environment that is home to 75 per cent of the world's coral species, the supplier undercompensates landowners, has allegedly paid bribes for its licences and created deep rifts in the traditional communities of Raja Ampat. Conservationists and activists have fought hard to have Raja Ampat, in West Papua province, protected but the mine on the island of Manuran where Queensland Nickel gets its nickel, PT Anugerah Surya Pratama, remains open. And its sister company continues to work at another disputed concession on the island of Kawe, despite a court order to desist. Advertisement

Life - Plants TopicBox Random! Seen these before? Animal and landscape sound effect…Foundation Stage / Animals / Hits: 6,800 Tudor BritainHistory / Tudors / Hits: 6,228 CT Scans of 3 MummiesHistory / Ancient Egyptians / Hits: 3,588 Words to parts of body and face…Foundation Stage / About Me / Hits: 3,335 2004: Thousands die in Asian tsunami 2004: Thousands die in Asian tsunami Massive sea surges triggered by an earthquake under the Indian Ocean have killed over 10,000 people in southern Asia, with many more feared dead. An 8.9 magnitude earthquake under the sea near Aceh, north Indonesia, at 0759 local time (0059 GMT) generated the biggest tsunami the world has seen for at least 40 years.

Australian Exceptionalism “Australian Exceptionalism”…. let that phrase roll off your tongue. Now stop laughing for a moment if you can! There’s something about that phrase that just doesn’t sit right with us. Arctic Plants As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Partners - For your unwavering support and evangelism.

Tsunami Frequently Asked Questions What is a tsunami? The name Tsunami, from the Japanese words tsu meaning harbour and nami meaning wave, is now used internationally to describe a series of waves travelling across the ocean. These waves have extremely long wavelengths, up to hundreds of kilometres between wave crests in the deep ocean. In the past, tsunamis have been referred to as 'tidal waves' or 'seismic sea waves'. The term 'tidal wave' is misleading. Even though a tsunami's impact upon a coastline is dependent on the tidal level at the time a tsunami strikes, tsunamis are unrelated to the tides.

Metgasco hits back at council bans METGASCO has hit back at Lismore City Council's decision to impose a moratorium on all coal seam gas activities on council controlled land. Metgasco chief executive Peter Henderson said yesterday that he was "most disappointed" with the council's reaction to proposed "low-risk" seismic testing. "We agree with the council's own internal advice (that) it does not have the authority to reject or prevent work which has been approved by State Government," Mr Henderson said. "We made the approach to council as a matter of respect and to ensure that it was informed of our operations. We did not receive the respectful, considered and professional response we expected ... Lismore council might wish to question if it is spending ratepayers' money in a responsible manner and acting in the best interests of the community.

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