background preloader

Tom Wujec on 3 ways the brain creates meaning

Tom Wujec on 3 ways the brain creates meaning

http://www.ted.com/talks/tom_wujec_on_3_ways_the_brain_creates_meaning.html

Related:  Psychologie humaineMind and Brain

Where Do Bad Moods Come From? What causes bad moods? Why do we sometimes slip into angry fits and melancholy torpors? In general, happy moods have easy explanations – we know why we’re elated. But a bad mood often seems to arrive out of the blue, a gloomy weather pattern that settles in from everywhere all at once. Body of Thought: How Trivial Sensations Can Influence Reasoning, Social Judgment and Perception Why do we look up to those we respect, stoop to the level of those we disdain and think warmly about those we love? Why do we hide dirty secrets or wash our hands of worries? Why do we ponder weighty subjects and feel a load lift after we have made a decision? Why do we look back on the past and forward to the future?

Creativity and IQ, Part I: What Is Divergent Thinking? How Is It Helped by Sleep, Humor and Alcohol? 16Share Synopsis In this two part blog post, we’ll look at the creative process and how your IQ level is critical in this process. A creative advert for condoms. What makes it creative? How Did Evolution Shape Human Behavior? Wonderfest 2010: How Did Evolution Shape Human Behavior? News In November, Stanford University and UC Berkeley were home to the 12th Annual Bay Area Festival of Science, aptly named Wonderfest . Two Leakey Foundation Grantees, Henry Gilbert , Assistant Professor of Anthropology at CSU East Bay and David DeGusta , former Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Stanford , were featured speakers.

Why has synesthesia survived evolution? Public release date: 22-Nov-2011 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Bryan Ghoshbghosh@plos.org 44-122-344-2837Public Library of Science In the 19th century, Francis Galton noted that certain people who were otherwise normal "saw" every number or letter tinged with a particular color, even though it was written in black ink. In Brain, Competing Thoughts Come in Waves and Rhythms Generation Next Blog ← Grown-up fun or girls behaving badly? • Meltdown or tantrum-what’s the difference? → Despite significant advances in brain imaging and cognitive science, neuroscientists continue to search for how the brain develops and retains perceptions and memories. Emerging evidence suggests that a group of neurons can represent each unique piece of information, but no one knows just what these ensembles look like, or how they form.

Is it Time for You to Earn or to Learn? This is part of my Startup Advice series I often have career discussions with entrepreneurs – both young and more mature – whether they should join company “X” or not. I usually pull the old trick of answering a question with a question. My reply is usually, “is it time for you to earn or to learn?” Let’s face it. Why It Pays to Taste Words and Hear Colors While most of us see sights and hear sounds, some people also hear colors and taste words, a mysterious phenomenon called synesthesia, which occurs when stimulating one of the five senses triggers experiences in an unrelated sense. Now researchers suggest this unusual trait can provide numerous mental benefits, potentially explaining why evolution has kept it around. Scientists first discovered synesthesia in the 19th century, noting that certain people saw every number or letter tinged with a particular color, even though they were written in black ink. This condition, known as grapheme-color synesthesia, is the most common of the more than 60 known variants of synesthesia.

A Little Weird? Prone to Depression? Blame Your Creative Brain Whenever you want to do something extraordinary, risky, or scary in your life (something that you know in your heart that you need to do, but it would really be more convenient to ignore it and just not do it), it’s essential to surround yourself with inspiring, encouraging, like-minded people. If they’re leaders in their own right who to a certain degree have done what you long to do, even better. I first met Gwyneth Leech last summer at my nephew’s first birthday party in Brooklyn (she’s my sister’s husband’s cousin). We were chatting idly until the moment she mentioned that she, a lifelong artist, had “accidentally” started creating art on used coffee cups, drawing to pass time in PTA meetings. Synesthesia's blended senses If you ask Emma Anders about the number five, she'll tell you that it's red. She'll also tell you that five is a mischievous, self-centered brat — like a kid throwing a temper tantrum at a party. "Two is yellow, three is purple, four is an intense sky blue," says the 21-year old student at UC San Diego. "An eight is very noble and kind of held together, almost like a parent figure to five.

Training the brain to overcome the effect of aging on the human eye : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group - StumbleUpon We have developed a structured perceptual learning treatment method for improving visual functions in presbyopia4, 12. Subjects were trained on contrast detection of Gabor targets under backward masking conditions, posing temporal constraints on the visual processing. The training covered a range of spatial frequencies and orientations that were modified in accordance with the performance improvement. Life's Messy. Train Your Brain to Adapt. What's the Big Idea? Margaret Moore is the founder and co-director of the Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital. Paul Hammerness, MD, is a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Together, they hope to get at the physical and psychological roots of chaos.

Related:  Visual ThinkingImproving CommunicationAmplify 2015