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Back to Basics, DIY Soda Can Stove

Back to Basics, DIY Soda Can Stove
A small portable way to cook your meals while you are out backpacking and do not want to carry something heavy, using a soda can stove will allow you to boil water, cook your meal, or rehydrate your meal while on the go or in an emergency situation. There are many different types of can stoves out there, here is one version. For this version the directions were taken fromthesodacanstove.com. After looking thru many different sites and youtube and ehow, this site had the best directions, that anyone who has never made a Soda Can Stove could follow, and a lot of the other sites left you wanting more information, which we could find here. Read our comparisons of can stoves. What is denatured alcohol How do I use my Stove Lighting stove How do I use the simmer ring How do I make a pot support for my soda can stove Materials List Step 1: Create Burner Holes Poke holes along the bottom edge of one of the cans with the hammer and nail. Step 2: Create Main Opening Step 3: Cut Out Stove Top

http://www.iwillgetready.com/back-to-basics-diy-soda-can-stove/

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