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Back to Basics, DIY Soda Can Stove

Back to Basics, DIY Soda Can Stove
A small portable way to cook your meals while you are out backpacking and do not want to carry something heavy, using a soda can stove will allow you to boil water, cook your meal, or rehydrate your meal while on the go or in an emergency situation. There are many different types of can stoves out there, here is one version. For this version the directions were taken fromthesodacanstove.com. After looking thru many different sites and youtube and ehow, this site had the best directions, that anyone who has never made a Soda Can Stove could follow, and a lot of the other sites left you wanting more information, which we could find here. Read our comparisons of can stoves. What is denatured alcohol How do I use my Stove Lighting stove How do I use the simmer ring How do I make a pot support for my soda can stove Materials List Step 1: Create Burner Holes Poke holes along the bottom edge of one of the cans with the hammer and nail. Step 2: Create Main Opening Step 3: Cut Out Stove Top Related:  Survivalismnatural home made products/remidies

Making Fire with a Bow Drill The components of the bow drill consist of the spindle, the hearthboard, bow and the bearing block. Downward pressure is applied by pushing down on the bearing block and rotation on the spindle is generated by the bow. In the right hand photo above, notice that the string closest to the left hand holding the bow is underneath the other half of the string. The left thumb is used to push down on the string to separate the string as the spindle is rotating. This keeps the string from abrading each other. Place a leaf underneath the notch to catch the char dust. Use a consistent sawing motion to create some char build-up in the notch. Transfer the glowing ember from the leaf to the the tinder bundle. Continue blowing until the tinder bundle bursts into flames. The spindle was California Buckeye. E-mail your comments to "Dino Labiste" at KahikoArts@yahoo.comE-mail questions answered about fire-by-friction. PrimitiveWays Home Page © PrimitiveWays 2013

100 Items to Disappear First 100 Items to Disappear First 1. Generators (Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy...target of thieves; maintenance etc.) 2. Water Filters/Purifiers 3. From a Sarajevo War Survivor: Experiencing horrible things that can happen in a war - death of parents and friends, hunger and malnutrition, endless freezing cold, fear, sniper attacks. 1. Wilderness Survival: Free info covering all aspects of survival. Small farms Small family farms are the backbone of a community, a nation, and of society as a whole. A landscape of family farms is settled, balanced and stable, and generally sustainable. It's the natural shape of society on the land. Such communities aggregate into strong and secure nations. But it's difficult to find a government that thinks that way, now or ever: the history of small farms presents a fantastic picture of neglect and abuse. Maybe the family farming landscape just doesn't offer enough opportunity for the rich and powerful, and the greedy. Compare Rome before the Punic Wars, built on a bedrock of independent yeoman farmers, with Rome after the wars, the small farms swallowed by big estates owned by nobles and worked by slaves, a mighty empire with cancer at its heart, inevitably to fall. The cancer at the heart of today's mighty industrial empire is the ruin that this woefully unbalanced landscape is wreaking upon both the natural and the social environment. Update, May 2008

Setting Up A Food Storage Pantry I strongly suggest you find a place in your home or on your property somewhere — either in a basement, spare bedroom, closet, junk room, under the stairway, heated garage, out building or root cellar — and turn it into your own home grocery store and pharmacy. Somehow, get shelves in there: Build them, have them built or buy them pre-built. The room needs to be well insulated so it doesn’t freeze in the winter or overheat in the summer. My pantry is located in the utility room next to my kitchen. I had about 2 feet of wasted space between the door and the wall, so I had two sets of rolling shelves built to fit in the space. They pull out and can be loaded from the back so the cans roll down and get rotated before their expiration date. My freezer is also located in this room, and I keep it stocked with the meats and frozen vegetables. I call my pantry “my home grocery store.” My Dehydrating, Sprouting And Baking Center I also sprinkle Italian herbs on slices of tomatoes and dry them.

Bug Out Bag – The 7 Types of Gear You Must Have to Survive Bug Out Bag For someone new to being a Survivalist building your first Bug Out Bag can seem like a big task. Everybody you read about has been tweaking theirs for months or even years and has a pile of gear built up. A Bug Out Bag, also called a BOB, I.N.C.H Bag (I’m Never Coming Home Bag),Get Out of Dodge Bag (GOOD Bag), or 72 Hour Bag is usually designed to get you out of an emergency situation and allow you to survive self-contained for up to 3 days. Here are the 7 basic types of gear you will need for your Bug Out Bag: 1. It should go without saying that water is a survival basic for any situation. 1 Liter per day per person is really the bare minimum. To expand your capability or survive longer than a couple of days you will need a water purification system. 2. Backpack Meals For a 3 Day Bug Out Bag Backpack Meals and Energy Bars can be sufficient. 3. Your Bug Out Bag clothes should be similar to what you would pack for a weekend backpacking trip. 4. They Don’t have a ground tarp… 5.

14 natural items for your alternative first aid kit Cloves. Photo by Elenadan Find out which multitasking natural remedies merit a spot in your backpack. IF YOU’VE COME TO trust in herbal and alternative medicine at home, it can be a hard decision to go back to Pepto-Bismol and Dayquil when you’re getting ready to go abroad. With these 14 items it’s easy to keep up that alternative health kick you’ve been on, even when you’re 5000 miles from home. 1. This is top of the list because it’s just so damn useful. Echinacea. 2. A powerful antibacterial, antibiotic, and antiparasitical potion. 3. Few things can kill a travel buzz like bad menstrual cramps. 4. All-Heal, Self- Heal and Heal-All are all common names of a plant which has many uses: antibiotic, antiseptic, astringent. Ginger root. 5. Stomach troubles are one of the most common issues among travelers. 6. Arnica is commonly found in two forms, either as a gel( look for Boiron brand) or in homeopathic pellets. 7. Native to Australia, the tea tree plant produces a powerful astringent oil.

Four Homemade Cleaners This was easier than I thought it would be. One of Betsy’s goals for the year was to ditch some of our standard cleaners that we use around the house and make them! Honestly, I was a bit skeptical about this project mainly because I wasn’t sure that homemade cleaners would really get the job done. And my lovely wife is a bit of a neat freak so there’s no way she would use something that didn’t perform well. So a couple of weekends ago she went out and bought a few staple ingredients and some empty spray bottles and we spent a few minutes mixing up four different homemade cleaners that have since replaced 90% of the cleaners we use around the house. For the last few weeks we’ve been using them now and I’ve been so impressed by how well they are working, I thought I’d share them all with you in case any of you are interested in ditching the chemicals. The Cost of Cleaning. Basic stuff. Really Clean Cleaning. The Basics. - Homemade: How to Make 100′s of Everyday Products Mixing the Solutions.

Homemade MREs For quite a while now, I've wanted to make up my own "MREs" for my Get Home Bag (GHB). I was recently out scouting some properties, and realized that my GHB only had some packs of tuna and some candy in them. I had broken my own Cardinal Rule - If you use it, replace it immediately. So, I went about making up some MRE packages. Now, these are not true MREs, in that their shelf life is less than half of the 5 years of a commercial MRE, but I figured they were WAY less expensive (remember this later on in the post...). I assembled my "ingredients" based on "Best By" date, calories and protein content. The idea was to put long-life food together and vacuum seal it in a FoodSaver bag. For my first MRE, here's what I included - Since the peanuts were loose, I wanted to separate them in the pouch. I then filled that with the peanuts and sealed it. I then filled the bag with the rest of the goodies, and vacuum sealed the whole thing - Here are the stats - Here's the result - Times have changed!

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