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The Great Mother from Asia Minor to Rome

The 7 Most Badass Last Stands in the History of Battle "Let me not then die ingloriously and without a struggle, but let me first do some great thing that shall be told among men hereafter." - Hector of Troy, Iliad XXII, Lines 304-5 Throughout the course of history, certain individuals have stood out as being completely fucking awesome. Whether it's cleaving monsters' faces in half with a chainsaw bayonet in Horde Mode, defending a makeshift fortress from a sea of brain-devouring zombies or manning a machine gun nest against an unstoppable sea of charging soldiers; people have always been fascinated with badass stories of one man, by himself, taking on a endless waves of assailants, refusing to back down in the face of insurmountable odds, dying with his fingers still clutching his weapons and leaving behind a smoldering, heaping pile of severed limbs, carnage and dead enemies. These are badass one-man last stands. Agis III of Sparta, 331 BC Agis wasn't above petty vandalism to make his point. Further Reading: Livius.org JStor.org Diodorus.

Archaeologists Excavate a Lost Kingdom Buried Beneath Volcanic Ash Like Pompeii, evidence shows a human settlement frozen in time by volcanic pyroclastic flows. In 1980, people began to take notice when workers from a commercial logging company began dredging up pottery fragments and bones in an area near the little village of Pancasila on the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. Other locals began finding coins, brassware and charred timber in the same region, all buried beneath a thick layer of volcanic deposits. Acting on the discovery of these finds in 2004, Volcanologist Haraldur Sigurdsson of the University of Rhode Island began investigating the jungle-shrouded area by using Ground Penetrating Radar. Sigurdsson's discovery touched off a series of formal excavations beginning in 2006 and continuing to this day under the direction of Dr M. One victim who was discovered during the 2009 excavations. The investigaive team will be returning to the site again in 2012. Excavating carbonized building beams (Photograph: Made Wita)

OH MY VOLCANO!!! INFORMATION CLEARING HOUSE. NEWS, COMMENTARY & INSIGHT Top 25 Most Ancient Historical Photographs For times immemorial, people have tried to reproduce their surroundings into pictures of their own. They have used techniques of paintings, carving and sculpturing and for years images have been projected onto surfaces. Photography is the result of combining several technical discoveries. 1. Source: (Link) Earliest known, surviving heliographic engraving in existence, made by Nicéphore Niépce in 1825 by the heliography process. 2. Source: (Link) The first permanent photograph (later accidentally destroyed) was an image produced in 1822 by the French inventor Joseph Nicéphore Niépce. 3. Source: (Link) Boulevard du Temple, taken by Louis Daguerre in late 1838, was the first-ever photograph of a person. 4. Source: (Link) Robert Cornelius, self-portrait, Oct. or Nov. 1839, approximate quarter plate daguerreotype which is a procedure invented in 1839 using silver on a copper plate. 5. Source: (Link) 6. Source: (Link) 7. Source: Unknown 8. 9. Source: (Link) 10. Source: (Link) 11. Source: (Link) 12.

Minoan Culture and its Women RWAAG Home, Minoan Culture--> Minoan Culture Advertisement: Minoan Snake Goddess Sculpture and Jewelry - Herakleion Museum, Crete, 1600BC. Shop in a catalog of almost everything Buy Greek items on Amazon.com Advertiser Specials, Discounts, Sales, and Savings If you click above and follow the links to a purchase then this site receives a commission for its support. The Minoan culture was an ancient culture that survived on the island of Crete of what is now Greece for almost 2000 years until about 1450 BCE For about 3000 years until the early part of the Twentieth Century this culture was entirely unknown. An image on a pot of a labrus image by which Evans was able to connect to the Minoan Culture to ancient writing found by him on Crete. There are a number of powerful reasons for studying the Minoan culture and its women including its obvious influence. The Romans and later European cultures knew nothing of a culture on Crete that predated the ancient Greeks. Minoan Clothing

Atheists More Motivated by Compassion than the Faithful Atheists and agnostics are more driven by compassion to help others than are highly religious people, a new study finds. That doesn't mean highly religious people don't give, according to the research to be published in the July 2012 issue of the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. But compassion seems to drive religious people's charitable feelings less than it other groups. "Overall, we find that for less religious people, the strength of their emotional connection to another person is critical to whether they will help that person or not," study co-author and University of California, Berkeley social psychologist Robb Willer said in a statement. "I was interested to find that this experience – an atheist being strongly influenced by his emotions to show generosity to strangers – was replicated in three large, systematic studies," Saslow said in a statement. "The compassion-inducing video had a big effect on their generosity," Willer said.

Top 10 Civilizations That Mysteriously Disappeared Throughout our history, most civilizations have either met a slow demise or were wiped out by natural disasters or invasion. But there are a few societies whose disappearance has scholars truly stumped: 10. The Olmec One of the first Mesoamerican societies, the Olmec inhabited the tropical lowlands of south-central Mexico. The first signs of the Olmec are around 1400 BC in the city of San Lorenzo, the main Olmec settlement which was supported by two other centers, Tenochtitlan and Potrero Nuevo. Where did they go? Around 400 BC the eastern half of the Olmec’s lands was depopulated- possibly due to environmental changes. 9. The Nabateans were a Semitic culture that inhabited parts of Jordan, Canaan and Arabia from around the sixth century BC. During the fourth century AD, the Nabateans abandoned Petra and no one really knows why. 8. The Aksumite Empire began in the first century AD in what is now Ethiopia and is believed to be the home of the Queen of Sheba. 7.The Mycenaeans 6. 4. 1.

Erectile dysfunction in the Middle Ages – historian examines medieval impotence cases Like today, the problem of male impotence in the Middle Ages was often serious, and had important consequences for marriages and families. A recent article deals with the issue, explaining how it showed up in court cases in 14th century York. ‘Privates on Parade: Impotence Cases as Evidence for Medieval Gender’, by Frederick Pederson, a senior lecturer at the University of Aberdeen, analyses two cases where wives attempted to annul their marriages because they claimed their husbands were impotent. These cases were adjudicated in ecclesiastical courts, also known as consistory courts, where decisions were based on canon law. Pederson notes that in the English cases the court would call upon a number of ‘honest women’ to perform a physical examination of the alleged erectile dysfunction. that the member of the said John is like an empty intestine of mottled skin and it does not have any flesh in it, nor veins in the skin, and the middle of its front is totally black.

LOL Theists Polish archaeologists in Sudan claim 'unique' human settlement discovery PR dla Zagranicy Nick Hodge 20.02.2013 14:32 Polish archaeologists working in Sudan have found remains of human settlements that appear to date back as far as 70,000 years. Photo: archeosudan.org If confirmed, the discovery in the Affad Basin of northern Sudan will challenge existing theories that our distant ancestors only began building permanent residences on leaving Africa and settling in Europe and Asia. “The Middle Palaeolithic discoveries in Affad are absolutely unique,” enthused Dr Marta Osypinska, one of the members of the team, in an interview with the Polish Press Agency (PAP). “Last season, we came across a few traces of a light wooden construction. The team will be cooperating at the site in the Nile Valley with academics from Oxford University, in a bid to further unravel the geological history of the area. More information on the project, which is funded by Poland's National Science Centre, can be found at web site archeosudan.org.

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