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THE COUNT-UP TO 2052: AN OVERARCHING FRAMEWORK FOR ACTION.

THE COUNT-UP TO 2052: AN OVERARCHING FRAMEWORK FOR ACTION.
After the publication of the Korean, Chinese and Japanese language editions of “2052 – A Global Forecast for the Next Forty Years”, the author, Club of Rome Member Jorgen Randers, gave talks in China, Korea and Japan in June 2013. There was an overwhelming media response in Asia. Inter alia, Jorgen Randers appeared on the Japanese Television program “Prime News 21″ (Fuji Television) on June 12th, 2013. To view the videos of the launch of the Report to the Club of Rome “2052-A Global Forecast for the Next Forty Years” in Rotterdam of May 7th 2012, please click here. The Italian edition of the “2052″ Report to the Club of Rome, written by Jorgen Randers, “2052. You can find more information on the Italian edition, which was published with Edizioni Ambiente, and a possibility to order here. Click here for a summary of the extensive media coverage of the launch event in Rome (in Italian). You can find more information on the Japanese version and a possibility to order here. Bankrupting Nature

An interview with Jorgen Randers: ’2052′ – “It’s the story of humanity not rising to the occasion” But I decided that for my own sake it would be interesting at least to know what will happen in sufficient detail for me to believe in it so that I could then decide whether I need to continue worrying for the future, and that was the very clear ambition 18 months ago, and now the book exists and it gives me in many ways great peace of mind because I believe in the forecast I have given there and in many ways it makes life much simpler I think, for a person who has been worrying about unsustainability for such a long time. For people who haven’t read the book yet, can you tell us about 2052? What’s it going to be like? It’s a book that describes, as detailed as I can, what will happen from now until 2052, so it’s a story about world developments over the next 40 years. At a very aggregate level what the forecast says is that humanity will try very hard to achieve economic growth, income growth over the next 40 years. I think you already see the simplest examples of those evolving.

The Global Economy Is A Giant Ponzi Scheme Essential for any healthy economy is the people to power it. And Europe, North America, Oceania — they’re all losing fuel. What will this mean for superpowers, national borders, and for xenophobia? Across once-tolerant Europe, political parties of the right are rising on a tide of bigotry. Geert Wilders of the Netherlands is the best-known example, but from Greece to Norway, from Austria to the UK, voters are flocking to far-right parties of prejudice. In America the political/racial divide has widened over the past decade or so. It’s happening in other places, too. Even in Australia, often cited as the most successful multicultural society in the world, issues of race, ethnicity and religion are increasingly prominent in political discourse. The question is, why? In a word, the answer is demographics. As we wrote in part one of this feature, half the world, including almost all the developed world, now is reproducing at below replacement level. But what happens if that all stops?

101 Signals: Want to Know Business? These Are the Only People You Need to Follow | Wired Business Business These are our favorite sources of news covering the world of business and finance. From macro­economics to microlending, these folks are all money when it comes to delivering high-value information. If you’re drowning in noise, let WIRED’s 101 Signals be your lifeline. These are the core nutrients of a good data diet. Download the OPML file to import our signals into your preferred news reader, or automatically add them to Digg Reader. If you want to see where technology is headed tomorrow, follow the collective pool of money that powers it today. Dave Birch is one of the few people tracking the global economy’s shift to digital payments in a way that’s neither DMV-dull nor Bitcoin-bananas. When Bernanke talks, the smart money listens to Bill McBride. Yeah, email is a nasty old fire hose of forwards, fallacies, and who the f@#! Along with his business partner Marc Andreessen, Ben Horowitz has been building megabucks companies since the ’90s. Illustration: Nishant Choksi

101 Signals: The 18 People Who Will Tell You Everything You Need to Know About Design | Wired Design Design To paraphrase Steve Jobs, design isn’t just what it looks like. It’s how it works. These sources break down the way design works–what’s coming up, what’s going down, and what you need to pay attention to. If you’re drowning in noise, let WIRED’s 101 Signals be your lifeline. Download the OPML file to import our signals into your preferred news reader, or automatically add them to Digg Reader. MoMA architecture and design curator Antonelli sees design as a critical lens on the way we live. Arcangel, a conceptual artist who works in videogames and Internet trivia, is what happens when Marcel Duchamp grows up with a Game Boy. Geoff Manaugh’s strange stew of architectural history, urban planning insight, and sci-fi philosophizing is unmatched reading for understanding the cities we live in. This is still where industrial designers go to hash out big challenges in actually shipping products. Brilliant interaction design from all corners of the web. Illustration: Nishant Choksi

101 Signals: You Only Need to Listen to 16 People to Know What's Up in the Tech World | Gadget Lab Consumer Technology When you want to know whether or not to buy that phone, install that software update, or join yet another social network, these are the feeds you need to follow. From gadgets to the operating systems that power them, these sources will keep you in the know. If you’re drowning in noise, let WIRED’s 101 signals be your lifeline. These are the core nutrients of a good data diet. Download the OPML file to import our signals into your preferred news reader, or automatically add them to Digg Reader. Medium’s recommended reading page is low in frequency yet high in influence, featuring insight from folks like MetaFilter founder Matt Haughey, Twitter cofounder Ev Williams, and former YouTube product guy Hunter Walk. Mary Jo Foley gets more Microsoft scoops than the Redmond Cold Stone Creamery, predicting the future with uncanny accuracy—from the return of the Start button to the end of the Zune. John Gruber’s writing and podcasts set the tone for Apple coverage.

101 Signals: The Only Government and Security Experts You Need to Follow to Stay on Top of the News | Threat Level Government & Security From domestic political campaigns to military campaigns in faraway lands to the attacks going on inside your computer right now, these reporters and researchers can be counted on to give you the news that matters about the state of law and security. If you’re drowning in noise, let WIRED’s 101 Signals be your lifeline. Download the OPML file to import our signals into your preferred news reader, or automatically add them to Digg Reader. Data privacy advocate Appelbaum was Julian Assange’s right-hand man and interviewed Edward Snowden. Coates’ trenchant, heartfelt essays on politics and pop culture offer a perspective found nowhere else and often turn debates on their head. A kind of proto-­WikiLeaks, this radical transparency site has dug up overhead photos of secret NSA facilities and documents from the FBI’s crackdown on Anonymous. Did you know that US Customs agents have kicked around the idea of adding non­lethal weaponry to their domestic Predator drones?

101 Signals: The 22 Thinkers, Websites, Explorers, and Feeds That Will Keep You in on All the Science News - Wired Science Science Junk science is everywhere, and today’s research is often discredited tomorrow. This mix of academics, writers, and thinkers will help guide you through the day-to-day discoveries about the world we live in. If you’re drowning in noise, let WIRED’s 101 Signals be your lifeline. These are the core nutrients of a good data diet *As long as you’re already getting your recommended daily allowance of WIRED’s blogs, Tumblrs, and feeds, of course. Download the OPML file to import our signals into your preferred news reader, or automatically add them to Digg Reader. Phil Plait covers more than astronomy—his skeptical, humanistic take on how science is practiced is keystone analysis. This Canadian is one of the ace-est of ace reporters covering new infectious diseases as they emerge. The British particle physicist is a tireless advocate of science, with multiple TV shows and radio programs to his credit, as well as several chart-topping rock songs in the UK. Illustration: Nishant Choksi

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