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Ta-Nehisi Coates - Authors

Ta-Nehisi Coates - Authors
On Monday, 66-year old Joan Tarshis accused Bill Cosby of raping her. Tarshis says the attack took place in 1969, when she was 19 and working as comedy writer: ... [H]e told me that he wanted to work on a monologue together, and I had an idea for something about an earthquake that had just happened. It was my first earthquake. I had some funny lines, and he said, Sure, let's work on that. Tarshis is the fifth woman to publicly accuse Bill Cosby of raping her. Perhaps it is not fair for a journalist to consider, or even publicize, anonymous allegations of criminal activity. Most of these allegations came after Constand sued Cosby in civil court. A defense of Cosby requires that one believe that several women have decided to publicly accuse one of the most powerful men in recent Hollywood history of a crime they have no hope of seeing prosecuted, and for which they are seeking no damages. I spent parts of 2006 and 2007 following Bill Cosby around the country. It was not enough.

http://www.theatlantic.com/ta-nehisi-coates/

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A Guide to Statistics on Historical Trends in Income Inequality The broad facts of income inequality over the past six decades are easily summarized: The years from the end of World War II into the 1970s were ones of substantial economic growth and broadly shared prosperity. Incomes grew rapidly and at roughly the same rate up and down the income ladder, roughly doubling in inflation-adjusted terms between the late 1940s and early 1970s. The income gap between those high up the income ladder and those on the middle and lower rungs — while substantial — did not change much during this period.

International Relations as Depicted by Cats gelly-matos asked: Have you guys heard of the Turkish government blaming election outages on a cat? And the subsequent twitter and meme storm that has erupted? I’m afraid I can’t comment other than to deny all responsibility and/or foreknowledge. Slavery Made America - Ta-Nehisi Coates Frederick Douglass (Library of Congress) About five years ago, I began a deep dive into the Civil War, most of it chronicled here. That dive culminated in an essay in our commemorative Civil War issue, much like my deep dive on housing and "colorless" policy culminated in The Case for Reparations. The earlier piece built toward the later one.

Most minimum wage workers are adults who work for large corporations May 10, 2013 One of the major arguments that comes up whenever there’s some talk about raising the minimum wage is “What about small businesses!” and “What about teenagers! Who is going to hire teenagers if they have to pay them anything close to a living wage?” It’s easy to assume that most minimum wage workers are teenagers working for some extra pocket change so they can get a dress for prom, go to the movies or buy some Adderall off that kid in third-period history. Are you a liberal imperialist? - by Stephen M. Walt Are you a liberal imperialist? Liberal imperialists are like kinder, gentler neoconservatives: Like neocons, they believe it’s America’s responsibility to right political and humanitarian wrongs around the world, and they’re comfortable with the idea of the United States deciding who will run countries such as Libya, Syria, or Afghanistan. Unlike neocons, liberal imperialists embrace and support international institutions (like the United Nations), and they are driven more by concern for human rights than they are by blind nationalism or protecting the U.S.

The Case for Reparations: A Narrative Bibliography - Ta-Nehisi Coates Library of Congress/Wikimedia Commons As I've said before, the idea of reparations precedes this month's cover of The Atlantic, and the work around it—among scholars, activists, and writers—has been ongoing, even if the interest of the broader world is fickle. Following up on the autopsy of an idea, I thought I'd give some larger sense of how something like this came to be. My hope is to give people who are interested some entrée into further reading, and also to credit the antecedents to my own thinking.

Open Content Program (The Getty) The Getty makes available, without charge, all available digital images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the public domain to be used for any purpose. No permission is required. For additional information please see the related press releases, as well as overviews of each phase of the program on The Getty Iris. Why Open Content? The Getty adopted the Open Content Program because we recognized the need to share images of works of art for free and without restriction, so that all those who create or appreciate art—scholars, artists, art lovers, and entrepreneurs—will have greater access to high-quality digital images for their studies and projects.

386 - My Kingdom for a Beer? Heineken's "Eurotopia" Freddy Heineken (1923-2002), the Dutch tycoon who made his beer into a global brand, also was a dedicated Europhile. Towards the end of his life, he proposed reshuffling Europe’s national borders to strengthen the supranational project whose stated goal is an “ever closer union”. Heineken collaborated with two historians to produce a booklet entitled “The United States of Europe, A Eurotopia?” The idea was timely, for two reasons. Eastern Europe was experiencing a period of turmoil, following the collapse of communism. The resulting wave of nationalism led to the re-emergence of several nation-states (i.e. the Baltics) and the break-up of several others (Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia).

Home Is Where the Hatred Is - Ta-Nehisi Coates A family in its one-room flat in Chicago, date unknown. (AP) In "The Case for Reparations," I tried to move the lens away from the enslaved and focus on their descendants. Narratively, I thought it made a much more compelling read and I it got us past the "but they're all long-dead" argument.

Psychology Research Databases Online collection of video available for the study of counseling, social work, psychotherapy, psychology, and psychiatric counseling. Includes three volumes. Volume 1: More than 400 hours of training videos, reenactments, and footage of actual therapy sessions conducted by renowned counselors, psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers. Contains videos from 1985-2010. Game of Thrones as Theory Commentary by foreign policy analysts on the first season of HBO's Game of Thrones stressed its supposed underlying theme of political realism. Thus one writer claimed that the TV show and the George R.R. Martin novels on which it is based "clearly demonstrate the power of might over right," and another agreed: "In this kind of harsh relative gains world, realpolitik should be the expected pattern of behavior."

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