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Fifteen Writing Exercises

Fifteen Writing Exercises
Writing exercises are a great way to increase your writing skills and generate new ideas. They give you perspective and help you break free from old patterns and crutches. To grow as a writer, you need to sometimes write without the expectation of publication or worry about who will read your work. Don’t fear imperfection. That is what practice is for. Pick ten people you know and write a one-sentence description for each of them.

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free writing exercises 1 -20 Exercises 1- 20 Exercises 21- 40 Exercses 41 - 60 Exercises 61-80 Exercises 81-100 Exercises 101 - 120 Exercises 121 - 140 Exercises 141 - 160 Exercises 161 - 180 Exercises 181 - 200 Exercises 201 - 240 For writing exercises for kids, click here. For teens, begin here. Exercise #1 Creative writing prompts Here are some creative writing prompts we've developed that you may find useful. We'll be adding to these periodically, so check back often. These have been compiled by many people, please feel free to contact us if you think of any. We'll be happy to add them. Creative Writing Prompts: Story Starters

Creative Writing Prompts for Sci-Fi & Fantasy Lovers Posted by Melissa Donovan on April 5, 2013 · Fantastical creative writing prompts. In the world of creative writing, we’ve only begun tapping the possibilities in speculative fiction, a genre that includes science fiction, fantasy, paranormal, supernatural, horror, and superhero stories, as well as anything that ventures beyond known reality. Speculative fiction is an under-recognized genre: Academia and literary elitists traditionally haven’t given it much credence, although it has been gaining acclaim in recent years. But the genre’s fans are rabid.

How to Structure A Story: The Eight-Point Arc By Ali Hale - 3 minute read One of my favourite “how to write” books is Nigel Watts’ Writing A Novel and Getting Published. My battered, torn and heavily-pencil-marked copy is a testament to how useful I’ve found it over the years. Although the cover appears to be on the verge of falling off altogether, I’ve risked opening the book once more to bring you Watts’ very useful “Eight-Point Story Arc” – a fool-proof, fail-safe and time-honoured way to structure a story. (Even if you’re a short story writer or flash fiction writer rather than a novelist, this structure still applies, so don’t be put off by the title of Watts’ book.) The eight points which Watts lists are, in order:

Creative Writing Prompts Write a scene that includes a character speaking a different language, speaking in a thick accent, or otherwise speaking in a way that is unintelligibe to the other characters. (Note: You don't necessarily need to know the language the character is speaking—be creative with it!) Describe a character's reaction to something without explaining what it is.

Journal Writing Prompts Looking for some free journal writing prompts? A situation might have arisen compelling you to record a piece of your history; to retell some of your family stories, your traditions, and highlight some of your quirky and unusual family members. What do you write about? Maybe you have considered writing your personal autobiography and need some ideas to get you started. Creative Writing Exercises for Craft No matter what stage you're at with your writing, it's always beneficial to work on craft and technique. These creative writing exercises target common problems and weaknesses. Switch Point of View Both first person and third person have their strengths and weaknesses; what works for one story may not work for another. This creative writing exercise will help you observe the effect of writing in the point of view that's less familiar to you. A Day Without Modifiers

3 Steps to Writing a Novel with Unforgettable Characters Character development is one of the first essential steps of writing a novel and it involves creating the people who will carry out your story. There will most likely be a variety of characters needed for your story, but none as important as your lead character – your protagonist. A well-developed protagonist has much to do with the success of writing a novel. When writing a novel, the protagonist should be someone that your readers feel is a “real person” that they come to love (or at least like a whole lot), can relate to in many ways, and will care about and think about long after they’ve turned the final page on your novel.

365 Pictures Daily Photo Prompts Generated for Your Creative Inspiration! Writing Prompts : 365 : 365 Creative Picture Prompts, Prompt-a-Day Generator One picture and text prompt per day to inspire your creative life. Visit again tomorrow for Journal Writing Prompt Personalized Journals | Journal Writing Tips | How to Blog - ScribeTime.net Journaling, Journal writing tips, blogging tips, and personalized journal gift shop. You are here: Home / Journaling / Writing Prompts – All About Me Dragon Writing Prompts As of today, that’s how many posts there are at Dragon Writing Prompts :-) I had vague thoughts of a prompt inspired by 1000 as I saw the number approaching. Well, no great original ideas popped into my head. No not-great original ones, either. ;-) So, since a picture’s worth 1000 words, I browsed through the writing area of Worth1000.com for a picture prompt.

How to Write a Flat Character Arc, Pt. 1: The First Act Next to the positive change arc, the flat character arc is the most popular storyline. Also called the “testing arc,” the flat arc is about a character who does not change. He already has the Truth figured out in the beginning of the story, and he uses that Truth to help him overcome various external tests. The flat-arc protagonist will be confronted with tremendous opposition. He will at times be shaken.

Writing Hacks, Part 1: Starting By Scott Berkun, Aug. 28 2006 (#54) Writing is easy, it’s quality that’s hard. Any idiot who knows 5 words can write a sentence (e.g. “Dufus big much Scott is”). It might be without grammar, broken, or inaccurate but it is still writing. This means when people can’t start they’re likely imagining the polished precision of the finished work.

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