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World’s largest sustainable city developed in China

World’s largest sustainable city developed in China
The world's largest sustainable city, extending about 30 square kilometers, with urban living conditions has been developed in South Asian country of China. Rising from wastelands in China, the globe's biggest eco-city of Tianjin is located 150 kilometres (93 miles) southeast from Beijing that means less than an hour on the new high-speed train line. The city, designed to be around half the size of Manhattan Island in the United States, is slated to be enriched by the hottest energy-saving technologies. Designed by Surbana Urban Planning Group, the city is planned to have an advanced light rail transit system and varied eco-landscapes ranging from a sun-powered solarscape to a greenery-clad earthscape for its estimated 350,000 residents. A sustainable city or eco-city is a preplanned city to produce their own energy, food and water in a way that does not cause detriment to the world in forms such as waste, water pollution or damage to the air.

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Awesome DIY Reuse Ideas The mantra reduce, reuse, recycle has been an effective phrase for years now, and companies like Terracycle have been successful following the model of reuse and reduction. Operating under founder Tom Szaky’s belief that “there is no such thing as trash,” Terracycle has found innovative ways to reuse everything from computers to drink pouches. With a creative eye and a bit of elbow grease, the endless possibilities that reuse offers can easily make their way into your home. Finding a new purpose for items you already have not only reduces your overall environmental impact, but it also gives you a way to become a frugal and funky visionary. Each piece that you revamp from a thrift store or from your home has the potential to become a unique work of art filled with sentimental value.

Old Red Goes Green: Recycled Wall Brick Built to Save Water It might look like your typical old red clay house-building brick on one side, but turn it over and there is a shift that hints at a deeper design change – one that is eco-friendly but also expressive in a way that most walls or brick are not. Designed by Jin-young Yoon to be made from recycled plastic and decomposed leaves, this brick is green from the ground up (so to speak). More than just its composite materials, however, built-in grooves are designed to funnel water for gardening or even long-term underground storage. In a world where water is becoming the next hot-button resource destined to become scarce, it seems like a good time to start thinking about our most basic building materials and structures (such as bricks and walls) and see how they might shift to accommodate an ever-growing need for homes to have access to nature’s most vital resource.

Building The Bionic City: The Ultimate Smart City EmailShare 109EmailShare ‘Ocean City’ concept by Arup Biomimetics in Australia // Source: Albert Einstein once said, “The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education.” Leonardo da Vinci exemplifies the pertinence of Einstein’s comment, for as an illegitimate child da Vinci was exempt from receiving a formal education and thus self-taught; learning much of what he knew from his personal observations of the natural world. The archetypal Renaissance man, while primarily renown as a painter, da Vinci was the forerunner of modern of science and the most prolific inventor the world has ever seen. We will never know how much more advanced our society would be today had the greater majority of da Vinci’s prolific body of scientific observations and inventions been preserved and distributed for the benefit of humankind.

The World’s First Vertical Forest: An I’d like to introduce you to the world’s first Bosco Verticale (Italian for Vertical Forest), which is being built right now in Milan. According to Christopher Woodward, a writer for the Financial Times, it’s “the most exciting new tower in the world.” This vertical forest will span across two towers that have fabulous balconies designed to house these trees. The pictures below are an image of how it’s projected to look, although I wonder if once the project is completed if it will take a decade for the trees to grow to that height. Wood, Stone & Glass Home Brings the Outside Indoors Many architects talk of responding to the site and integrating their buildings with the surrounding natural environment, but few execute that intention with the compelling completeness shown in this house design. Moreover, the decisions that shaped this unique home were driven as much by sustainability and energy savings as they were by aesthetics and formal considerations. The glass roof that spans the main structure allows natural lighting deep into the Base Valley House while providing a way for breezes crossing the site to pass through and cool the structure. Bedrooms carved out of the ground below are kept out of the sun and cooled year round by the surrounding earth. Encased in wire mesh, stone retaining walls continue seamlessly from outdoors through the inside of the house, providing structural support to hold back surrounding dirt.

What our civilization needs is a billion-year plan Artist’s concept of a Kardashev Type 2 civilization (credit: Chris Cold) Lt Col Garretson — one of the USAF’s most farsighted and original thinkers — has been at the forefront of USAF strategy on the long-term future in projects such as Blue Horizons (on KurzweilAI — see video), Energy Horizons, Space Solar Power, the AF Futures Game, the USAF Strategic Environmental Assessment, and the USAF RPA Flight Plan. Now in this exclusive to KurzweilAI, he pushes the boundary of long-term thinking about humanity’s survival out to the edge … and beyond. — Ed. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Air Force or the U.S. government.

Earth Home Plans and Designs - the Basics Building a basic, minimalist earth home is not a difficult task, at least not for somebody who is prepared for this type of eco-friendly dwelling. Nevertheless, sometimes it is more beneficial to ask for help from someone who has some experience in planning, designing and eventually supervising the construction of an earth home. Below is a list of some basic rules and that should be adhered to if one wants to succeed at building an earth home. How to plan and build a basic earth home? Finding the right kind of soil is the first requirement.

Sky Garden House - Architecture Linked - Architect &Architectural Social... - StumbleUpon I think one of the reasons that many are skeptical about environmental design is because they think its terribly complex and costly. It does take a bit more effort on the front end, but it's definitely not rocket science. This architecture by Guz Architects is a wonderfully developed minimalistic design with a curvilinear flare that really brings out the organic coverings. I'm most impressed with how design facilitates the needs of the plants and shrubs located throughout the house. See more at Guz Architects Off-Grid Sustainable Housing : Timeless Earth Solutions All housing and community spaces will be built as beautiful, clean, ‘living’, functional, efficient, sustainable and regenerative Several aspects of living successfully in community are addressed to provide workable options for our members: Zoning: In order to maintain a sense of freedom while maintaining a respect for the space and privacy of other members, zoning by use will be employed. Although community involvement, participation and celebration is encouraged, so is respect for members’ desire for quiet, focus, contemplation, meditation and rest. Thus, separate zoning will be provided for the following.

Low-cost Blooming Bamboo home built to withstand floods The Blooming Bamboo home, by Vietnamese architectural firm H&P Architects (Photo: Doan Thanh Ha) Image Gallery (30 images) Vietnamese architectural firm H&P Architects has produced a new prototype dwelling constructed from bamboo. Outdoor-Lover’s Paradise: Perfect Modern Open-Plan House You should have no trouble seeing the forest through the trees while standing anywhere inside or outside this stunning home. The residence is less of a house and more of an all-in-one exterior experience, flowing with green roofs, outdoor patios, expansive decks and a seamless clear-sided swimming pool (though one could wish it were deep enough to dive into from the rooftop above). A central green courtyard brings life to even the innermost spaces of the dwelling, with plants overhanging from its walls above and trees sprouting up from the divided grass-or-gravel ground below. It might not be surprising but: these same designers have a history planning resorts and multi-family vacation destinations, experience which has clearly informed this single-family house. A series of rough-cut rectangular stone pillars serve to establish a border fence that is at once semi-transparent and secure, with slots that allow for limit views between each vertical post.

Global Village Construction Set Definition[edit] The Global Village Construction Set (GVCS) is a modular, DIY, low-cost, high-performance platform that enables fabrication of the 50 different Industrial Machines that it takes to build a small, sustainable civilization with modern comforts. The name, GVCS, has been coined for the first time in 2008 - at a lecture at the University of Missouri, Columbia - see UM Presentation. Media[edit] Key Features[edit] GVCS Machines[edit] 101 PERMACULTURE DESIGNS, downloadable imgur album hugelkultur basics hugelkultur basics sheet mulching basics