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100 Ideas That Changed Graphic Design

100 Ideas That Changed Graphic Design
by Maria Popova From visual puns to the grid, or what Edward Tufte has to do with the invention of the fine print. Design history books abound, but they tend to be organized by chronology and focused on concrete -isms. From publisher Laurence King, who brought us the epic Saul Bass monograph, and the prolific design writer Steven Heller with design critic Veronique Vienne comes 100 Ideas that Changed Graphic Design — a thoughtfully curated inventory of abstract concepts that defined and shaped the art and craft of graphic design, each illustrated with exemplary images and historical context. Idea # 16: METAPHORIC LETTERING Trying to Look Good Limits My Life (2004), part of Stefan Sagmeister’s typographic project '20 Things I Have Learned in My Life So Far.' Idea # 83: PSYCHEDELIA Gebrauchsgraphik (1968). Idea # 31: RED WITH BLACK Heller and Vienne write in the introduction: Idea # 19: VISUAL PUNS Idea # 17: PASTICHE Idea # 80: TEEN MAGAZINES Idea # 35: EXPRESSION OF SPEED Idea # 25: MANIFESTOS

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/05/08/100-ideas-that-changed-graphic-design/

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Fail Safe: Debbie Millman’s Advice on Courage and the Creative Life By Maria Popova The seasonal trope of the commencement address is upon us as wisdom on life is being dispensed from graduation podiums around the world. After Greil Marcus’s meditation on the essence of art and Neil Gaiman’s counsel on the creative life, here comes a heartening speech by artist, strategist, and interviewer extraordinaire Debbie Millman, delivered to the graduating class at San Jose State University. The talk is based on an essay titled “Fail Safe” from her fantastic 2009 anthology Look Both Ways: Illustrated Essays on the Intersection of Life and Design (public library) and which has previously appeared on Literary Jukebox. The essay, which explores such existential skills as living with uncertainty, embracing the unfamiliar, allowing for not knowing, and cultivating what John Keats has famously termed “negative capability,” is reproduced below with the artist’s permission. If you imagine less, less will be what you undoubtedly deserve.

40 Must Follow Design Blogs On Twitter Twitter is just simply a great tool in order to network with other design blogs within the design community. This article contains a run down of 40 must follow design blogs which are on twitter with a brief description about each blog. Following bloggers on twitter is great in order to learn more about about that specific design blog and, to keep up to data or simply just to network with other great people who know a lot about design.

Geek deemed word of the year by the Collins online dictionary Once a slur reserved for eggheads and an insult aimed at lovers of computer programming, geek has been deemed the word of the year by the Collins online dictionary. Less brazen than selfie – which topped the Oxford Dictionaries poll last month – geek was chosen as a reminder of how an insult can be transformed into a badge of honour, according to Collins. In September the dictionary changed the main definition of geek from someone preoccupied with computing to "a person who is very knowledgeable and enthusiastic about a specific subject'', adding geekery, geek chic and geekdom to the fold.

What Makes Iconic Design: Lessons from the Visual History of the London Underground Logo by Maria Popova Celebrating 150 years of elegant balance between tradition and innovation. The London Underground is renowned around the world for its iconic map, which has sprouted a number of creative derivatives and parodies, and its formidable legacy of graphic design. A Kid’s Guide to Graphic Design by Iconic Designer Chip Kidd by Maria Popova “Graphic design needs your willing mental participation, even if it’s subconscious.” “It doesn’t occur to most people that everything is designed — that every building and everything they touch in the world is designed,” the late and great Bill Moggridge, designer of the world’s first laptop, famously reminded us.

How McLuhan, Agel, and Fiore Created a New Visual Vernacular for the Information Age by Maria Popova The rise of the experimental paperback and how ‘typophotography’ paved the information superhighway. One faithful day in 1965, the most monumental and legendary typo in media history took place: someone switched a letter in the title of what soon became an era-defining book by legendary media theorist Marshall McLuhan*, best known for coining the catchphrase “the medium is the message.”

From Jack Kerouac to Ayn Rand: Iconic Writers on Symbolism, 1963 by Maria Popova A Rorschach Test with a spine, or what the art of fluid writing has to do with salt. In 1963 — long before Twitter, email, and even the Internet itself as we know it — a 16-year-old high school student by the name of Bruce McAllister set out to settle a dispute with his English teacher over whether symbolism existed as a conscious device authors employed in writing. So he devised a four-question mimeographed survey to probe the issue and mailed it to 150 of the era’s most notable writers, much like librarian Marguerite Hart did in the lovely Letters to the Children of Troy project. To McAllister’s surprise, he got 75 responses, ranging from the passionate to the reprimanding to the deeply philosophical.

10 great quotes about design A look at the Target Design Café at TED2014, with the North Shore Mountains in the background. Photo: Bret Hartman For years now, Target has invited designers like Isaac Mizrahi (watch his TED Talk), Diane von Furstenberg (check out her TED playlist) and, most recently, abstract pattern-master Peter Pilotto to dream up collections. What’s Our Vision for the Future of Learning? The following is an excerpt from Open: How We’ll Live, Work, and Learn in the Future written by British learning Futurist David Price. By David Price For 150 years, formal education has adopted an ‘inside-out’ mindset – schools and colleges have usually been organised around the needs of the educators, not the learners. In areas such as research, this is nothing to be embarrassed about.

Psychology TED Talks Welcome to YouTube! The location filter shows you popular videos from the selected country or region on lists like Most Viewed and in search results.To change your location filter, please use the links in the footer at the bottom of the page. Click "OK" to accept this setting, or click "Cancel" to set your location filter to "Worldwide". How Technology Wires the Learning Brain Kids between the ages of 8 and 18 spend 11.5 hours a day using technology — whether that’s computers, television, mobile phones, or video games – and usually more than one at a time. That’s a big chunk of their 15 or 16 waking hours. But does that spell doom for the next generation? Not necessarily, according to Dr. Gary Small, a neuroscientist and professor at UCLA, who spoke at the Learning & the Brain Conference last week. “Young people are born into technology, and they’re used to using it 24/7,” Small said.

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