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OER Handbook for Educators 1.0

OER Handbook for Educators 1.0
In this handbook Welcome to the world of Open Educational Resources (OER). This handbook is designed to help educators find, use, develop and share OER to enhance their effectiveness online and in the classroom. Although no prior knowledge of OER[1] is required, some experience using a computer and browsing the Internet will be helpful. For example, it is preferable that you have experience using a word processor (e.g. Open Office[2] or Microsoft Word) and basic media production software, such as an image editor (e.g. The handbook works best when there is some sort of OER you would like to create or make available to others, but it is also useful for the curious reader. There are several ways to use this handbook, including: You are not expected to be an instructional designer or media production expert to use this book. What this handbook does not cover OER is a broad topic and it would be difficult, if not impossible, to cover it comprehensively. Notes Introduction Find OER Compose OER Related:  OER

University of Michigan | Open.Michigan A Basic Guide to Open Educational Resources (OER) Description This Guide comprises three sections. The first – a summary of the key issues – is presented in the form of a set of ‘Frequently Asked Questions’. Its purpose is to provide readers with a quick and user-friendly introduction to Open Educational Resources (OER) and some of the key issues to think about when exploring how to use OER most effectively. The second section is a more comprehensive analysis of these issues, presented in the form of a traditional research paper. For those who have a deeper interest in OER, this section will assist with making the case for OER more substantively. The third section is a set of appendices, containing more detailed information about specific areas of relevance to OER. Prepared by Neil Butcherfor the Commonwealth of Learning & UNESCOEdited by Asha Kanwar (COL) and Stamenka Uvalić-Trumbić (UNESCO) A higher-resolution print version is also available from COL. Reader Comments

Teachers Guide to The 21st Century Learning Model : Connected Learning In the last Digital and Learning Conference that took place in San Francisco, researchers and scholars cited an ever-widening gap between what they considered in-school learning and out-of-school learning. The abyss between the two types of learning is growing wider and wider as more and more students are having free unlimited access to all kinds of information online. For them school curricula are boring as they teach things that are not immediately related to their everyday lives. This is why disengagement, short attention span, and lack of motivation are among the most alarmingly challenging issues confronting every teacher today. Researchers in Digital Media and Learning Conference stressed upon the fact that for learning to be effective, it definitely needs to be " interest-driven and reinforced in the different contexts of kids lives by parents, educators, and knowledgeable peers." The Essence of Connected Learning from DML Research Hub on Vimeo. Features of Connected Learning

80 Resources for Open Education Developers Many Open Education Resources (OER) have been introduced by governments, universities, and individuals within the past few years. OERs provide teaching and learning materials that are freely available and offered online for anyone to use. Whether you’re an instructor, student, or self-learner, you have access to full courses, modules, syllabi, lectures, assignments, quizzes, activities, games, simulations, and tools to create these components. While some OERs include OpenCourseWare (OCW) or other educational materials, they may also offer the means to alter those courses through editing, adding to those courses through publication, and the ability to shape the tools that share those resources. Additionally, they may maintain forums or other platforms where individuals can collaborate on building educational tools and documentation and the reach for those materials. This list is not all-inclusive, as resources that offer limited collaboration were excluded.

OER Commons /chapter: About-This-Book / Open Education Handbook 2014 "Open Education" is a topic which has become increasingly popular in a variety of contexts. This handbook has been written to provide a useful point of reference for readers with a range of different roles and interests who are interested in learning more about the concept of Open Education and to help them deal with a variety of practical situations. As a "living" online document, we hope that it will continue to evolve, reflecting cutting edge research and innovation in this area and helping educational communities to come to an improved understanding of the value of open. When the process of writing this book first started, the original intention was only to cover open data use in education. We have been guided by the idea that the handbook will continue to grow and evolve through involvment with the learning communities it is intended to support. During the course of writing the handbook many organisations and individuals related to The Open Education Working Group have contributed.

Home Overview Management Learning & Teaching Technical Legal JISC/HE Academy UKOER Programme UKOER tweets Going further... Recent changes to the infoKit Cookie statement Last Cookiweek David Kernohan, a JISC Programme Manager, commented in a Guardian article last week that Open Educational Resources are a radical idea that has now become mainstream. To try and condense some of the vast amount that has been learnt about the benefits of OER releases in the past 10 years, the Higher Education Academy and JISC have developed an InfoKit. (David Kernohan) As David mentions, one section that was missing up until now is a section giving an overview of Open Educational Resources for Senior Managers. · OER infoKit >>> Senior Management Overview >>> Menu If you're a Senior Manager - or even if you're not - we'd love some feedback!

OpenContentToolkit - Links to Open Content Sources This page lists organisation hosting open content and curated links to sources of open content to make them easy to find, access and use. Some of the links are likely to be referenced elsewhere in the toolkit, one one or more resources or examples. The purpose of this section is not to provide a detailed commentary on the resources, but some basic contextual information. Lane Hartwell - CC BY-SA 3.0Wikimedia Commons Is the repository that stores the media and date that is used across the Wikimedia projects, links to high quality content and 'Picture of the Day"Flickr Commons Flickr Commons host photographic collections from major cultural institutions, with 'no known copyright restrictions'.Internet Archive A vast portal to text, image, audio, video and web resources.Project Gutenberg46,000 free ebooks or online, many illustrated.Comic Book Plusa historically significant archive, of well known and not so well known comic characters - free and legal to use. Thomas Shahan.

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