background preloader

17 Apart: How to Grow Green Onions Indefinitely

17 Apart: How to Grow Green Onions Indefinitely
I'm officially dubbing this the week of Scallions and Pinterest. Mary and I separately came across 2 trending ideas for using and growing green onions on the highly addictive bookmarking site, Pinterest, last week — we couldn't wait to try them. When I came home over the weekend with a bunch of scallions, Mary exclaimed, "did you see this scallion/ginger sauce I pinned — you should totally make that!" Little did she know I had pinned it hours before her, which is virtually light years in terms of Pinterest discoveries. I had been planning to make this ginger scallion sauce from Lottie + Doof since I first set eyes on it. Find my own variation on the recipe newly published on E.A.T. — this is one I'd definitely recommend trying. It's a great little accompaniment that could be used in so many ways. So, back to scallions and Pinterest. All I can say is... it works! This is it guys — place a bunch of scallions with their roots in a glass full of water, then place in a sunny window. P.S.

http://www.17apart.com/2012/02/how-to-grow-green-onions-indefinitely.html

Related:  Green and FrugalGardeningGardeningsustainable agriculturetuinieren

17 Apart: Growing Celery Indoors: Never Buy Celery Again Remember when we tested and shared how to grow onions indefinitely last week? Well, at the same time, we've been testing out another little indoor gardening project first gleaned from Pinterest that we're excited to share the successes of today — regrowing celery from it's base. We've figured out how to literally re-grow organic celery from the base of the bunch we bought from the store a couple weeks ago. I swear, we must have been living under a rock all these years or just not be that resourceful when it comes to food, but we're having more fun learning all these new little tips and tricks as we dive deeper into trying to grow more of our own food. Fall Garden Review Today’s blog entry is one of a four-post series that highlights my garden favorites over the past year — one post per season. I hope you’ll come back and see more stories from the past winter, spring, and summer, many of which I’ve never shared before, here or elsewhere. Little Bo Peep seems to shiver in the cooler morning air of fall, but there is still time for this tromboncino squash to mature. September 23rd, 2012 Prologue Big numbers can be hard to understand.

5 Steps to Storing Potatoes for Winter I have an unheated corner in my basement that is perfect for storing potatoes for winter. This corner stays dark, cool, and performs like a root cellar. I have added a good-sized shelving area where I store the food preserved during the growing season. The shelves are filling up with baskets of onions, garlic, and canned tomato sauce, jelly, salsa, beans, carrots, grape juice, pickles, and applesauce. I can’t help but feel a sense of pride and accomplishment as I look over the jars and baskets of homegrown bounty. Not only because we have this food to feed us but I also feel good knowing exactly where my food comes from and that it was grown with no chemicals. Update: Our Sweet Potatoes & More Some of you have been asking for updates on our houseplant projects — today we’re bringing you a progress report on our sweet potatoes! Last we checked in, they were hanging out all happy in their coffee sack bag planters, but not really showing any major growth (pictured above). After letting them sit and do their thing for about a month, the vines have really begun to take off: We’re at the point now where we’re considering filling more dirt into the bag to cover the lower portion of the vine and just roll the sides of the bags up as we add dirt.

50 Resources To Help You Become More Self-Sufficient We live in an interdependent world. Although at one time all of humankind lived independently and self-sufficiently, group cooperation allowed for more efficient use of resources when hunting and gathering, raising young, making clothing and tools, and building shelters. Banding together ensured our long-term survival; dividing labor into specialized tasks has helped sculpt today’s modern, globalized society. Because of specialization, we enjoy a high quality of life. 12 companion plants to grow alongside your tomatoes © MrBrownThumb Companion planting is part science and folklore. Grouping friendly plants together in the garden is suppose to help enhance growth, flavor and protect plants from pests. As an urban gardener with a small garden, my interest in companion planting is mostly centered on maximizing space.

Winter Gardening Tips: Best Winter Crops and Cold-Hardy Varieties When we think of eating homegrown food during the cold season, we often think of staples such as potatoes squirreled away in the root cellar, or of vegetables such as winter squash stashed in a cool, dry place. But many gardeners are discovering the joys of harvesting fresh produce all winter long, which allows for feasts of cold-hardy crops that are just-picked and just right for the time of year. According to Jodi Lew-Smith of High Mowing Seeds in Wolcott, Vt., the seed-buying season used to be January, February and March. “Now there’s also a surge in June, July, August and into September for fall-planted crops,” she says. Eating from the garden is just too pleasant to give up simply because the temperature — and the snow — may have fallen.

The Ultimate Raised Bed - Make a Keyhole Garden Raised bed gardening is my favorite way to garden. I love the ease of set up, harvesting is a snap and, if you set your beds up right, there is little weeding to be done. Making a keyhole garden uses all these concepts and more! Raised beds are nothing new. The idea is to elevate the garden to maximize drainage, improve the soil, and enhance access. Keyhole gardens are a riff on that idea, with one addition: a center compost area that works as a self-fertilizing element for the plants. Encourage Prosperity, Alleviate Famine and Heal the Environment with Hemp By Carolanne Wright Guest Writer for Wake Up World Hemp. Just the word conjures images of the Drug Enforcement Administration and political battles.

Related: