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Are We Wringing the Creativity Out of Kids?

Are We Wringing the Creativity Out of Kids?
Do you think you’re creative?” Ask this question of a group of second-graders, and about 95 percent of them will answer “Yes.” Three years later, when the kids are in fifth grade, that proportion will drop to 50 percent—and by the time they’re seniors in high school, it’s down to 5 percent. Author Jonah Lehrer recently discussed the implications of these sobering statistics for education in his new book, Imagine: How Creativity Works. In a talk and question-and-answer session he participated in at the Commonwealth Club in Palo Alto, California, last month, Lehrer talked about why children lose their playful sense of creativity as they get older, and how we can help them hang on to it. Lehrer began by quoting Picasso: “Every child is born an artist. “Right now we are grooming our kids to think in a very particular way, which assumes that the right way to be thinking is to be attentive, to stare straight ahead.” Related

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/05/are-we-wringing-the-creativity-out-of-kids/

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Knowledge sharing with Slinkset widgets A few months back I wrote an article about creating your broadcast network to feed information to your PLN. In the article I included a section on a tool called Slinkset which I used to create my Technogogy news portal, which I use to share information and links to informative articles about education, technology and ELT. Recently, I have discovered a new feature of Slinkset that automatically creates a widget that other blog or website managers can add to their site to aggregate and share the content of your portal. I think this is a great feature and one that can really extend the reach of the information you are sharing beyond your immediate network. The widget is very easy to install. You just need to direct web managers or bloggers to the relevant link on your portal.

Co-Creative Processes in Education: The Small Things That Make a Big Difference Posted by core jr | 10 Mar 2014 | Comments (0) This is the third article in an ongoing series about working with kids by Copenhagen-based architect/designer/educator Moa Dickmark. Her last article was on the Future of Learning Environments. There are a few things that one should think about when it comes to working on a project using co-creative processes.

How Teachers Can Become Fluent in Classroom Technology During one of our last leadership team meetings this past school year, we reflected on our use of digital portfolios to house student work. We had a lot to celebrate: We had found a digital tool to capture student learning, Evernote, a cloud-based note-taking app. No one felt much pressure to be the best at using technology.

Creativity on the Run: 18 Apps that Support the Creative Process "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." - Albert Einstein We do not need to teach creativity, but rather inspire its daily practice. Somewhere along the way, we simply forgot to honor this innate gift and how to access its power. Our role as educators is to encourage learning experiences that increase the ability to recognize and listen to our inner voice. Let us begin by shifting emphasis from finding the right answer to creating school cultures that encourage risk-taking and embrace ambiguity. Johnson - Creating a Writing Course Utilizing Class and Student The Internet TESL Journal Andrew Johnsonchompjp [at] mac.comRitsumeikan University (Tokyo, Japan) Weblogs, or blogs for short, were created as a tool for people to create online journals without the need of any programming experience or knowledge. Although not originally intended for use in EFL classes, blogs have immense potential as an extremely valuable tool for the teaching of second language writing. By utilizing free blogging services on the Internet, teachers are capable of creating and storing online supplemental materials for students, post class notes for student review, and give general feedback to the class as a whole and individually.

What to do when Genius Hour fails… A teacher I work with asked me last week, “How do we deal with those students who aren’t doing anything with Genius Hour? I feel like I’ve helped and helped…but they don’t seem to care at all.” Maybe you’ve had this same experience with a student (or group of students) while running a Genius Hour or 20% Project in your class. Maybe it is something that worries you about starting this type of learning project where students get to choose their learning path, and delve into their interests and passions.

Education World: What Five-Year-Olds Can Do with Computers By Susan Brooks What can five-year-olds do with a computer? A lot, says school technology facilitator Susan Brooks. On the Edge of Chaos: Where Creativity Flourishes Getty If it’s true, in Sir Ken Robinson’s words, that “Creativity is not an option, it’s an absolute necessity,” then it’s that much more imperative to find ways to bring creativity to learning. But first, we have to understand what conditions foster true creativity. One definition that scientists have agreed upon for creativity is the ability to create something that’s both novel as compared to what came before, and has value. “It’s this intersection of novelty and value, a combination of those two features that’s particularly important,” Dr. Blog » Blogging Our students just finished a second round of Student Led Conferences (SLC) this school year (one in Semester 1 and another in Semester 2). SLCs are a formal opportunity for students to present to their parents about the state of their learning. The students’ advisor (a teacher responsible for a specific group of students during the school year) serves as a facilitator to prompt and guide the students if needed, but is a silent presence as the students share their learning with their parents. SLCs are not a time to talk about grades, student behavior, but about learning habits, process, improvements and goals.

Fuel Creativity in the Classroom with Divergent Thinking Recently, I showed a group of students in my high school art class a film called Ma Vie En Rose (My Life in Pink), about a seven-year-old boy named Ludovic who identifies as female. Ludovic has an active imagination, but is bullied by both adults and other kids who are unnerved by his desire to wear dresses and play with dolls. The film challenged my students to broaden their understanding of gender and identity and led to a discussion about ways in which our imaginations are limited when we are forced to be who we are not. It also reminded me of other examples in which character is forced to choose an identity, such as the movie Divergent, based on the popular trilogy of novels by Veronica Roth. In Divergent, a dystopian future society has been divided into five factions based on perceived virtues. Young people are forced to choose a faction as a rite of passage to becoming an adult.

Teacher's Guide to International Collaboration on the Internet The Teacher's Guide to International Collaboration was developed to help teachers use the Internet to "reach out" globally. These materials were prepared as part of the Department of Education's International Education Initiative. This guide is designed for online access. On every page, teachers will find many projects and suggestions to begin or expand classroom projects that reach across the globe. In every section of this on-line guide, we have also provided links to elementary, middle and high school projects and links to organizations that are involved in international education via the Internet.

10 Ways to Teach Innovation Getty By Thom Markham One overriding challenge is now coming to the fore in public consciousness: We need to reinvent just about everything. Whether scientific advances, technology breakthroughs, new political and economic structures, environmental solutions, or an updated code of ethics for 21st century life, everything is in flux—and everything demands innovative, out of the box thinking. The burden of reinvention, of course, falls on today’s generation of students.

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